Advertisement
HomeCollectionsState Auditor
IN THE NEWS

State Auditor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Carroll County public schools should strengthen financial controls and network security, seek all valid Medicaid-related reimbursements, review some of their contractor arrangements and re-evaluate their food service operations, according to a report released by the state Office of Legislative Audits. Those measures could save the county as much as $4 million a year, said the report released last week. "These are recommendations," said Bruce A. Myers, legislative auditor. "We have no enforcement power, but we can advise.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
The head of the state Senate committee that is leading an inquiry into what went wrong with Maryland's health exchange is planning to turn the probe over to state auditors — who would not release a report until summer at the earliest. Sen. Thomas M. Middleton, who chairs the Finance Committee, said this week that the panel is unlikely to hold further hearings on the matter this legislative session. His "tentative" plan is to give the mountain of documents that his committee requested from health officials to legislative auditors, who already were scheduled to do a financial review of the exchange this summer.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 12, 2006
Warren Louis Therien, a retired state auditor and World War II veteran, died of complications from an infection Dec. 5 at Carroll Hospital Center. The longtime Westminster resident was 84. Mr. Therien was born in Bellingham, Mass., and was raised in Woonsocket, R.I. During Prohibition, his father, a bootlegger, ran liquor from Canada into New England. "He often went with his father on bootleg runs, sitting on cases covered with blankets because having a child in the car meant the police were less likely to pull the car over to search," said a daughter, Dorothy G. Scanlan of Westminster.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The Maryland Tax Court has frequently failed to rule on residential property assessment cases as promptly as the law requires, according to a state audit made public Thursday. The court, which hears appeals in cases involving state and local taxes, must hear and decide residential property assessment cases within 90 days. But 41 percent of the cases heard between July 2010 and mid-February took longer - as much as a year past the 90-day point, the Office of Legislative Audits said.
NEWS
December 12, 1993
It's decision time for a special legislative task force looking into abuses of Maryland's contract-award system. Members are split over what to do about the problems that have arisen. But there's no doubt major changes are in order.The group's primary decision deals with oversight. At the moment, Maryland's contracting system is a hodge-podge involving numerous agencies. No one is in overall command. In fact, state officials cannot even say with certainty how many contracts are handed out by Maryland each year.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | June 14, 1991
The Cold War between the Schaefer administration and the legislative auditors who are supposed to keep tabs on it has turned hot again.This time around, Secretary of Licensing and Regulation William A. Fogle Jr. has charged that a state auditor misrepresented himself when he inquired about reviewing the department's personnel records.But William S. Ratchford 2nd, head of the General Assembly's Department of Fiscal Services, said the flap is the result of a minor misunderstanding and is being used to make it difficult for his auditors to do their job.Fogle said his staff personnel chief received a telephone call Monday from someone who identified himself as an employee of the state Department of Personnel.
NEWS
September 8, 1994
An obituary of Walter Woernle last Thursday should have described him as a member of the evangelization committee of the Perry Hall Baptist Church.The Sun regrets the errors.@Walter WoernleOwned printing firmWalter Woernle, retired owner of a printing business, died Monday at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center of heart and kidney failure. He was 81 and lived in the Cub Hill area of Baltimore County.The Baltimore native, who retired about 15 years ago as owner of the Holiday Press, graduated from Towson High School.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
A 36-year-old man was arrested yesterday in a Baltimore carryout while posing as a state sales tax auditor, police reported.Michael Thomas Henson, who police said had traveled around the world as a teen-ager by duping people out of their money, was arrested at the Sunshine Carryout at 2 E. Lombard St. by Detective William A. Booker of the checks and fraud unit.Henson was arrested on a warrant charging him with failure to appear in court on theft and drug paraphernalia charges, police said.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | February 26, 1992
A 36-year-old man was arrested yesterday in a downtown carryout shop posing as a state sales tax auditor, city police reported.Michael Thomas Henson, who as a teen-ager, police said, traveled around the world on money he had duped people out of, was arrested at the Sunshine Carryout at 2 East Lombard St. by Det. William A. Booker, of the Checks and Fraud unit.Henson was arrested on a warrant charging him with failing to appear in court on theft and drug paraphernalia charges, police said.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
State auditors are examining how well Maryland's assessments agency has managed the homestead property tax credit, a popular tax break for homeowners that has come under increased scrutiny since The Baltimore Sun revealed that hundreds of city owners were improperly receiving multiple credits. Auditors have been at the Department of Assessments and Taxation for the past two weeks, said its director, Robert E. Young. The goal is to complete a review of the homestead credit program in time for next year's General Assembly session, which starts in January, according to chief auditor Bruce Myers.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
The state contractor that collects child support payments in Baltimore continues to have trouble meeting the terms of its agreement, according to a report released Wednesday by the Office of Legislative Audits calling for better oversight by the Department of Human Resources. In a follow-up review after blasting the agency last year for not doing enough to collect payments, the auditors said the state had completed or begun to address nearly all issues, but noted that the department had made only "minimal progress" addressing contracting issues in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
State auditors are examining how well Maryland's assessments agency has managed the homestead property tax credit, a popular tax break for homeowners that has come under increased scrutiny since The Baltimore Sun revealed that hundreds of city owners were improperly receiving multiple credits. Auditors have been at the Department of Assessments and Taxation for the past two weeks, said its director, Robert E. Young. The goal is to complete a review of the homestead credit program in time for next year's General Assembly session, which starts in January, according to chief auditor Bruce Myers.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The Maryland State Lottery failed to collect tens of thousands of dollars from manufacturers who did not promptly fix inoperable slot machines, state auditors found in their first review of the agency since the start of the state's slots program in 2010. The audit also found other problems with slots oversight, as well as issues with security protections for the agency's computer networks. Both Bruce Myers, the legislative auditor, and Stephen Martino, the head of the lottery agency, characterized the issues as small problems for a fledgling slots operation that do not translate into any agency wrongdoing.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Carroll County public schools should strengthen financial controls and network security, seek all valid Medicaid-related reimbursements, review some of their contractor arrangements and re-evaluate their food service operations, according to a report released by the state Office of Legislative Audits. Those measures could save the county as much as $4 million a year, said the report released last week. "These are recommendations," said Bruce A. Myers, legislative auditor. "We have no enforcement power, but we can advise.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
The president of Baltimore City Community College says she's "completely perplexed" by a recently released state audit that questions the circumstances around a $200,000 payment to the college. President Carolane Williams said the 2009 payment, from the college's landlord at the Maryland BioPark in West Baltimore, was always intended as a gift to support BCCC's involvement with the facility. The audit, released Wednesday, said the circumstances of the payment were questionable, because the college referred to it in multiple documents as related to BCCC's lease agreement with Wexford Science & Technology.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is not properly securing birth, death and marriage certificates, leaving the vital records vulnerable to criminals, according to a new legislative audit. State and local health departments issued more than 600,000 copies of the records last year, for $7 million in fees. The case of one employee, who is suspected by auditors of misappropriating some fees, is being referred to the attorney general's office. Copies of birth certificates issued at the state and local levels were of particular concern to the auditors because they could aid illegal immigration and flights from justice.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The Maryland State Lottery failed to collect tens of thousands of dollars from manufacturers who did not promptly fix inoperable slot machines, state auditors found in their first review of the agency since the start of the state's slots program in 2010. The audit also found other problems with slots oversight, as well as issues with security protections for the agency's computer networks. Both Bruce Myers, the legislative auditor, and Stephen Martino, the head of the lottery agency, characterized the issues as small problems for a fledgling slots operation that do not translate into any agency wrongdoing.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | July 16, 2010
A state home for developmentally disabled adults improperly kept nearly $80,000 that it should have returned to the state general fund at the end of fiscal year 2009, the Office of Legislative Audits reported Friday. The state Department of Mental Health and Mental Hygiene, which operates the Potomac Center in Hagerstown, has agreed to return the $79,800 to the general fund, according to a letter signed by Secretary John M. Colmers and included in the OLA report. Auditors for OLA, an agency of the Department of Legislative Services, found that the Potomac Center did not have adequate records to substantiate expenditures it had accrued June 30, 2009, the last day of the fiscal year.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | July 16, 2010
A state home for developmentally disabled adults improperly kept nearly $80,000 that it should have returned to the state general fund at the end of fiscal year 2009, the Office of Legislative Audits reported Friday. The state Department of Mental Health and Mental Hygiene, which operates the Potomac Center in Hagerstown, has agreed to return the $79,800 to the general fund, according to a letter signed by Secretary John M. Colmers and included in the OLA report. Auditors for OLA, an agency of the Department of Legislative Services, found that the Potomac Center did not have adequate records to substantiate expenditures it had accrued June 30, 2009, the last day of the fiscal year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.