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NEWS
July 16, 1997
A headline in some editions of The Sun yesterday improperly identified prosecutors seeking a jail sentence for convicted embezzler Joseph E. Goldberg Sr. The prosecutors were from the state attorney general's office. Also, the crime was investigated by the Insurance Fraud Division of the Maryland Insurance Administration, along with the Criminal Investigation Division of the attorney general's office.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/16/97
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Louis E. Schmidt, a retired state assistant attorney general who was an acting secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died of congestive heart failure Oct. 29 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 87 and lived in Sparks. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pimlico, he was the son of George Schmidt, an architect, and Mary Hemmeter, a homemaker. His father died when he was 1 year old. After the 1929 market crash, his mother lost her home and savings, and he was sent to live with relatives.
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NEWS
May 29, 2003
A nursing assistant has been charged with elder abuse and assault after allegedly striking an 84-year-old resident of Longview Nursing Home in Manchester, the state attorney general's office announced yesterday. Sue Allen Head, 34, of Ortanna, Pa., who was charged May 20, was assigned to care for the woman, who could not communicate and suffered from end-stage dementia and multiple medical problems, the attorney general's office said. On Oct. 31, Head struck the patient with such force that the blow left a mark, and an eyewitness reported hearing the assault from across the room, according to the attorney general's office.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
For the past month, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown has been making news in the 2014 Democratic race for governor. His presumed chief rival, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, has been biding his time. Brown became the first big name Democrat out of the gate when he made his candidacy official May 10. He followed that up quickly with last week's news that Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, previously a prospective rival, has agreed to be his running mate. As Brown and Ulman celebrate their new political partnership Monday in Columbia, the question is what Gansler's next move will be. Does the attorney general have an effective counter to Brown's jack rabbit start and recruitment of a top-tier ticket mate?
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
A fight over who should run Anne Arundel County's drug-asset forfeiture program may be nearing an end, with the state attorney general's office stepping in to help negotiate.Meanwhile, it appears unlikely that the county will force a needy 21-year-old Glen Burnie man who allegedly received a car improperly through that program to surrender the vehicle, county spokeswoman Lisa Ritter said.Two police officers and an assistant county attorney have been accused of breaking the law by working with a nonprofit organization to donate a car to Tavon Johnson, a college student who took custody of his 15-year-old brother after their mother abandoned them.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
The senior member of Carroll's legislative delegation has asked the state attorney general to issue a second opinion on the county commissioners' compensation, revisiting a controversy many considered settled.Republican Del. Donald B. Elliott requested an advisory opinion about a week ago, shortly after the commissioners proposed replacing their $12 per diem -- a bonus they receive each day they show up to work or appear at an official function -- with a monthly allowance.The $675 allowance would have covered car and home office expenses, and would have been in addition to each commissioner's $32,500 part-time salary.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
Maryland voters handily turned down a constitutional convention referendum question. By law, the question has to appear on the ballot every 20 years. Some 60 percent of the state voters were against the question that would have mandated a state constitutional convention.In a separate ballot question, voters also approved a measure bTC which will add language to the constitution allowing state and local officials to serve as members of a military reserve while also working for the state.While arguments have been made that the constitution prohibits such dual service to the government, a handful of state judges and legislators are and have been active members of the Maryland National Guard or federal reserve units.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | May 12, 1993
The Harford County executive and the sheriff exchanged accusations yesterday over the handling of an investigation into the suspicious death of an inmate last year at the Detention Center.Sheriff Robert E. Comes, whose office has been harshly criticized for the way the investigation was conducted, called a 10 a.m. news conference to say that the Maryland attorney general should look into the way state, federal and other county officials have dealt with the case.County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann held her own news conference an hour later to respond: "It's apparent the sheriff is attempting to move the focus away from the Detention Center, while he still seems to have some problems out there."
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has approved $30,000 for the state ethics commission to hire former state Attorney General Stephen H. Sachs as its lawyer in a case against lobbyist Gerard E. Evans. Evans served time in prison after his July 2000 conviction on federal fraud charges, and the commission wants to bar him from representing clients before the General Assembly. Evans' attorney argues that the commission is trying to retroactively apply a new ethics law to improperly strip him of his license to practice as a lobbyist.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
An influential lawmaker has asked the state attorney general's office to investigate whether there had been any "illegal activities" in the Maryland Department of Transportation's handling of a $43 million contract award for van and cab services for the disabled. Del. Peter Franchot, chairman of the House transportation subcommittee, sent a letter Wednesday to Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. in which he cited evidence that state employees involved in the selection of vendors had improper communications with some of the rival vendors.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
The civil rights chief for the Maryland attorney general's office was accused this week of violating probation in a drunken-driving case. Carl O. Snowden is scheduled for arraignment or similar appearance Jan. 7 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court in that case, according to court records. On probation for three years, he could be ordered jailed for up to 60 days if judge finds that he violated probation. The case has unusual twists. Snowden was initially given probation before judgment on a 2010 charge.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
Morton A. Sacks, a retired trial lawyer and former Maryland assistant attorney general, died of heart disease Aug. 29 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The Linthicum resident, who lived for 40 years in Bolton Hill, was 74. Born in Baltimore and raised in Lochearn, he met his future wife, Marylou Botten, at Milford Mill Junior High School. "We sat next to each other in the eighth grade," she said. The couple went on to graduate from Milford Mill Senior High School in 1956.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
The Maryland medical society and attorney general's office launched a website Saturday aimed at helping doctors file complaints with the state when insurance companies refuse to cover patient care. "Essentially, our goal was to educate our patients and our physicians that there is an avenue for these complaints," said Gene Ransom III, CEO of MedChi, the state medical society. "We thought, 'Let's make it easier.'" The site, called Insurance Watch, is hosted on the Internet by the medical society.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
As state attorneys general across the country consider whether to settle with big banks over shoddy and illegal foreclosure practices, some Marylanders are urging Douglas F. Gansler not to sign on the dotted line. Their efforts are part of a nationwide effort to press for investigations and lawsuits instead. Gansler joined other Democratic attorneys general in Chicago on Monday to discuss proposed settlement terms, while their Republican counterparts talked details in a conference call.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
More than two dozen Maryland home builders have agreed to pay penalties totaling $26,000 to settle allegations that they violated state building laws, Maryland's Attorney General said Tuesday. Ryan Homes, NV Homes, Rachuba Home Builders LLC and Pulte Home Corp. were among 27 builders that reached settlements with the state Consumer Protection Division's Home Builder Registration Unit. State officials said violations included companies operating without being registered and failing to disclose information to the registration unit in applications.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
The civil rights director for the state attorney general's office was convicted Friday of driving while impaired, but the sentence for Carl O. Snowden remained the same as before an illegal disposition was tossed out last month. "An appeal will be filed," Snowden said after leaving the courtroom, where Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth changed the initial outcome for the drunken-driving charge. In November, Snowden, 57, received probation before judgment on a drunken-driving charge from the previous June.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | January 29, 1994
For the first time, the state attorney general's office is seeking an injunction to shut down a Maryland charity and to force its directors to repay donations allegedly used for such expenditures as airfare, electronic equipment, parking tickets and a for-profit business.Three people affiliated with Gopal Charities Food for Life Inc. could be barred from soliciting donations in Maryland for up to two years if an Anne Arundel County circuit judge grants the injunction sought by the state. No hearing date has been set for the case.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Rafael Alvarez and Holly Selby contributed to this report | November 9, 1994
Democratic incumbent J. Joseph Curran Jr. won the slugfest for state attorney general, knocking out aggressive Republican challenger Richard D. Bennett late last night.Meanwhile, the ultimate incumbent, state Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein, rolled to an easy victory. The 81-year-old Democrat won a record 10th term, proving that age and incumbency do not have to be drawbacks.Attorney General Curran won 54 percent of the vote to Mr. Bennett's 46 percent."I'm humbled, gratified, elated and very proud," he told supporters at his Baltimore headquarters.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | April 1, 2010
A House of Delegates committee rejected Wednesday a Republican lawmaker's attempt to impeach Maryland's attorney general over an opinion he issued recently on same-sex marriage. Del. Don H. Dwyer Jr. of Anne Arundel County had asked fellow delegates to initiate the impeachment process for Douglas F. Gansler, a Democrat, who said Maryland should recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states. Dwyer says Gansler's opinion wrongly overturned state policy on such unions. The House Judiciary Committee rejected Dwyer's effort, voting 15-5 that Gansler's conduct did not merit impeachment proceedings.
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