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By New York Times | October 10, 1991
Just as state and local governments complete an agonizing round of large-scale layoffs of public employees, many budget directors are predicting that with the economy still faltering and revenue declining, a whole new wave of layoffs may be necessary."
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NEWS
August 18, 2013
A group of do-gooders has picked Maryland as its test case for trying to make state and local government more transparent and participatory using technology, and they've already made some inroads in improving the way state and local laws are published on the web. But the source of this effort may surprise some in this deep blue state: Rep. Darrell Issa, the California Republican who serves as one of President Barack Obama's chief antagonists in Congress....
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NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | December 20, 1993
Washington -- When states and localities start to enforce the Brady Bill next year, some may be firing blanks.The bill, which calls for a five-day waiting period and background check of handgun buyers, has no enforcement mechanism. It does not provide money for state and local governments to carry out its provisions and doesn't say what will happen if they don't.This is not an isolated oversight. It is just the latest example of Washington's propensity to enact laws and regulations that impose various requirements, restrictions and procedures on state and local governments, but do not provide the money to carry them out.For example, the Family Support Act of 1988 requires states to increase efforts to establish paternity and collect child-support payments.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 22, 2013
A proposal to levy storm-water fees on many state-owned properties has cleared the House, setting the stage for shrinking a loophole in the year-old law that requires private landowners pay to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay. Delegates voted unanimously for HB508 , which partially removes an exemption for state lands in the law enacted last year mandating that Baltimore city and Maryland's nine largest counties levy a storm-water cleanup fee...
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | June 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - I've never met a dog catcher and I've never voted for one, either. But I constantly meet people who associate all politicians who are not the president or vice president, members of Congress, governors or mayors with dog catchers. I teach and write about politics, and when I make arguments about state and local politics, I get the dog catcher reference six or seven times out of 10. For example, when I say that citizens need information about political races at the local and state levels more than the federal level, I get this line: "Right.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | February 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The federal government will pay $8.8 million of the estimated $12.2 million needed to reconstruct the storm-ravaged Ocean City beach, leaving state and local governments responsible for the rest, officials said yesterday.The $3.4 million local share of the project to rebuild dunes and beach will come from an existing $8 million state and local beach repair fund, and will not require cash-strapped local governments to scramble for the money.Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Baltimore said they expect to hire a contractor by the end of March to pump sand from offshore to restore 8.5 miles of beach and dune damaged by a Jan. 4 storm.
NEWS
November 2, 2007
A delegation of Iraqi officials met with Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown yesterday as part of a U.S. State Department program to learn more about the relationship between federal, state and local governments, according to a news release. Mamoon S. Rashid Al-Alwani, governor of Anbar province, Abdulsalam A. Mohammed, chairman of the Anbar Provincial Council, and other Iraqi officials traveled to the United States as part of an International Visitor Leadership Program, sponsored by the State Department.
NEWS
February 11, 2008
With friends like this Diplomacy was never his strong suit, but President Bush has finally realized it's a job somebody's got to do. Tucked into his 2009 budget is funding to hire nearly 1,100 diplomats. They should help replenish the depleted ranks of the State Department overseas. Mr. Bush's decision likely had more to do with friendship than fortifying the U.S. diplomatic mission - Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice made several calls on a White House budget appeals committee to plead for expanding the diplomatic corps.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 19, 1993
As the rest of the world becomes more keenly competitive,America's 87,000 state and local governments lag years behind the times in how they motivate, hire, promote and fire their 15.5 million employees.For the safety of our drinking water, education of our children, policing of our communities, public health, highways and much more, we all depend intimately on state and local government workers. Yet the national future could be threatened if states and bTC localities keep postponing dramatic personnel reform.
NEWS
By Benjamin L. Cardin | January 30, 2003
AS A former speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates, I was always sympathetic when my Republican colleagues in Congress spoke of the importance of empowering state and local governments to design programs specifically for their communities. But now that Republicans have taken control of Congress and the White House, they no longer seem very interested in the goal of promoting state flexibility. In fact, their new mantra seems to be replacing liberal micromanagement with conservative micromanagement.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
If there is a general theme that runs through The Sun's investigation of speed camera programs on the state and local level in the Baltimore area, it is this: Governments have found ways to follow the letter of the law that maximize the number of citations issued while flouting the spirit of the law that protects the public from erroneous tickets. The law is designed to prevent the camera operator from being paid on a per ticket basis, but Baltimore City, Baltimore County and, to an extent, Howard County found a way around that.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
President Barack Obama on Thursday declared a major disaster in Maryland following the storms and high winds of late June and early July, and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the areas affected. The deadly derecho that ripped through the state June 29 damaged buildings, utility lines and trees, leaving hundreds of thousands in Maryland without power. The disaster declaration covers the storms and winds from June 29 through July 8. Federal funding is now available to the state and local governments and some nonprofits for emergency work and repairs to facilities in Baltimore City and Calvert, Charles, Kent, Montgomery and St. Mary's counties.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 7, 2012
Stopping sprawl needn't amount to a "war on rural Maryland," but pragmatic conservationists realize that rural residents need sustainable jobs if they hope to avoid endless battles over keeping farmland and forests from giving way to tract homes and strip malls. The Eastern Shore Land Conservancy is tackling that challenge Friday with an all-day " rural jobs summit " in Easton.  State and local officials, planners, farmers, business and community leaders have been invited to come discuss ways of preserving rural economies as well as land.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Beginning next year, Marylanders will have online access to some of state lawmakers'  ethics documents, though not as access much as some have pushed for. Under a bill that passed at the end of the session, every lawmaker will have to file forms disclosing both their own and their spouses' outside employment, and those will be posted online. Conflict-of-interest forms that legislators are already required to file with the Joint Ethics Committee also will be posted. But lawmakers' comprehensive annual financial disclosure forms won't be published online.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
At a tidy jail in Frederick County, Sheriff Chuck Jenkins and his deputies have helped federal authorities identify nearly 1,000 illegal immigrants for deportation in the past three years. In a renovated mansion in Prince George's County, Casa de Maryland employees have welcomed tens of thousands of immigrants over the years, regardless of legal status, teaching them English, helping with citizenship paperwork and defending them against policies like the one in Frederick County. Maryland has a split personality about illegal immigrants — a divide illustrated this year by the legislature's passage of a bill to provide college tuition breaks to undocumented state high school graduates only to have it put on hold by a citizen petition.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Even with home prices in the dumps, saving to buy a home may be out of reach for many. But if you work at Johns Hopkins and find a rowhouse in a downtrodden neighborhood nearby, you could qualify for as much as $29,500 to help with the down payment and closing costs. That's money available through city, state and employer programs designed to boost home ownership. And if you don't quite fit that description, you still may be eligible for thousands of dollars to help buy a principal residence.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | March 13, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer appointed a 17-member panel yesterday that he says is the linchpin to controlling residential and commercial sprawl in Maryland's suburbs.The panel will oversee and guide the 23 counties and Baltimore )) City and other municipalities as they revise local land-use regulations to reflect the "seven visions" for growth adopted by nTC the General Assembly last year.Those broad "visions" call on the local governments to channel construction into existing communities, which already have roads and other necessary public works, and away from the state's open and forested spaces.
NEWS
February 2, 1994
First the mayors then the governors -- both in Washington for their mid-winter conventions -- talked crime with President Clinton.They want help but they don't want the financial burden and policy straitjacket that often go with federal government attempts to help state and local governments.They also don't want president and Congress telling them what to do about such things as sentencing. This came up in a discussion between the president and representatives of the National Governors' Association of one of the crime bills now before Congress.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 17, 2009
Dr. Percy V. Williams, a retired educator who was a pioneer in Harford County public school desegregation, died of pneumonia Saturday at Harford Memorial Hospital. The Havre de Grace resident was 95. Born in Perryman, he grew up on a farm his father, Vandellia Williams, bought after land he owned was taken for what is now the Aberdeen Proving Ground. The son of sharecroppers, the elder Williams had few rules and advised his son to "Go to church, do what's right, get an education," according to a 1995 Sun article.
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