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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | May 2, 1992
Bethlehem Steel Corp. will pay $3.5 million in fines over the next two years for air pollution violations caused by the now-idled coke ovens at its Sparrows Point plant, state and federal officials announced yesterday.The penalty, the largest ever assessed for pollution violations in Maryland, is to be paid as part of a settlement of lawsuits filed against Bethlehem Steel in the past two years by state and federal environmental agencies.The settlement ends a long-running dispute between the steelmaker and government officials over the coke ovens.
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NEWS
By Brian Dolan | July 14, 2014
Roadways today are in the worst condition they have been since the 1940s. In our world of advanced technology how could this have happened? We know that more people are driving every day. Younger Americans frequently have their own car or access to a family vehicle, and older Americans are living longer and driving more in their later years. Goods moved by truck also far exceed those moved by rail, by boat, by barge or by air because of the flexibility trucks have to deliver to your home or neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Baltimore County's cantankerous councilmen may learn how hard it is to just say no to the federal government.The council's 5-2 vote Monday night to refuse $95,750 in federal money to run the local Ridesharing program may achieve nothing more than putting two county workers out of jobs.That's because the state could hire a consultant to operate the program or run it with the same money, said Liz Kalinowski of the Department of Transportation.Meanwhile, County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III said he would like the council to reconsider the vote, but would not make it a major issue.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Authorities charged 17 alleged members of a West Baltimore cocaine and heroin ring that used distinctive yellow and green packaging for its product, the State's Attorney's Office said Wednesday. Three men were charged in federal court and had their initial appearances before a judge in the afternoon. Of the 14 others, 9 were arrested Wednesday in a series of raids that police said hit multiple places around Baltimore. The drug ring operated in the Gilmor Homes public housing project and the case was developed by the Baltimore police and Drug Enforcement Administration using wiretaps, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 1, 2003
In Maryland State receives $690,000 grant for insurance program ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland received a $690,000 federal grant yesterday to help start a health insurance program for residents who have been turned down for coverage because of chronic sickness. Maryland was the first state to receive money from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for high-risk pools, state and federal officials said. A new Maryland Health Insurance Plan for sick, uninsured residents will open July 1, and 8,000 people covered under a different program that is ending will be transferred into the new initiative, officials said.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
In an effort to keep its state license and a coveted multimillion-dollar state contract, lawyers for PrimeHealth Corp. announced yesterday that its principal owner had resigned from the board of directors and placed his stock in a blind trust.In a letter to state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, PrimeHealth attorney Warren N. Weaver said that Dr. Christian E. Chinwuba, who owns 81 percent of the Prince George's County company, "no longer exercises any degree of control" over the operation of the health maintenance organization.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,and Scott Higham. SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
Nearly a year after state and federal prosecutors launched separate investigations of former state Sen. Larry Young, the U.S. attorney's office has made an unusual proposal to combine the cases and transfer them to a federal grand jury, according to sources close to the investigation.The proposal comes as a state grand jury in Anne Arundel County nears the end of its examination of the West Baltimore Democrat, who was expelled from the Senate in January. The grand jury is expected to vote in the next few weeks on whether to indict Young on bribery and possibly other charges.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
Concerned about the possible misuse of federal drug funds, the FBI has launched its own investigation of the discredited Maryland State Games program, according to sources.In particular, federal investigators are looking to see if any federal drug-grant money was misspent by the State Games program, sources said.The federal investigation comes in the midst of a similar probe of the program by the criminal division of the state attorney general's office.As the State Games scandal unfolded between December and February, the two top officials of the state health department, as well as the leader of the games, lost their jobs.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Stephanie Hanes and Laura Vozzella and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
In the wake of last weekend's shooting death of a Baltimore police officer, Mayor Martin O'Malley questioned yesterday U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio's commitment to prosecuting city gun crimes. O'Malley has long criticized DiBiagio, saying he should try more gun cases in the federal system, where juries tend to be tougher on crime and prisons do not offer parole. The mayor renewed those complaints yesterday when asked at a news conference whether breakdowns in the criminal justice system put officers such as Brian D. Winder at risk.
NEWS
October 1, 2007
Carlos Woods is learning the hard way what it means to be tagged a violent repeat offender by law enforcement in Baltimore. Mr. Woods, 23, has been a target of police and prosecutors since 2001 because of his alleged role in crimes of violence, including murder and attempted murder. He managed to escape any serious jail time, but now he's facing 20 years or more in prison because state and federal prosecutors were creative, timely and relentless in using the law to convict him any way they could.
NEWS
By E. Albert Reece | December 30, 2012
The spending cuts associated with the impending fiscal cliff - known more technically as sequestration - hold potentially ominous consequences for the U.S. economy, and for Maryland in particular, if the White House and Congress cannot strike a deal soon to avert them. The "sequestration" clause of the Budget Control Act of 2011 triggers an approximately 8 percent across-the-board cut in federal discretionary spending. Although all states in the U.S. are likely to be harmed, perhaps no state will be more adversely affected than Maryland, with its high concentration of bioscience and federal employees.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
A federal judge finalized on Thursday a landmark settlement that will bring nearly $1 billion in aid to Maryland homeowners who were victims of deceptive and illegal foreclosure practices. The settlement, for $25 billion in total, was first reached in February and is the largest ever joint state and federal settlement, according to Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler. Gansler had joined the federal government and 48 other state attorneys general in complaining about the banks' practices.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
The federal nuclear regulator approved Thursday the proposed sale of Constellation Energy Group to Chicago-based Exelon Corp. The decision by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission means the proposed $7.9 billion merger has two remaining regulatory hurdles to clear. The Maryland Public Service Commission is expected to issue a decision Friday, while the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission also needs to rule on the deal, which would create the largest competitive energy company in the United States.
EXPLORE
January 30, 2012
It's that time of year again for Harford County Tax-Aide. Reservations are being take for the program's free state and federal tax preparation services for low and moderate income county residents. Actual preparation of returns begins Wednesday, Feb. 1. Volunteers for the Harford County Tax-Aide Program recently completed a two-week training program on preparing federal and Maryland state tax forms for the 2011 tax year. Those who successfully completed the training are certified by the IRS and the state of Maryland to prepare tax returns free for middle and low income taxpayers, with special attention given to those ages 60 and older.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
Last week's column on a little-known state group that helps consumers with medical disputes generated emails from readers asking if organizations exist that can help them tackle other problems. Many agencies can help wronged consumers. The Federal Communications Commission, for example, mediates phone bill disputes, and the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau wants to hear about problems with credit cards. But before you reach for outside help, take a few steps on your own. First, contact the business directly and try to resolve the problem.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
More than 200 Anne Arundel County residents have used services at the county's newest career center since it began operating less than two months ago, county officials said Wednesday. Kirkland J. Murray, president and CEO of the Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp., said about two-thirds of those job seekers have found employment or been referred to job training programs. The center, Murray said at an open house Wednesday morning, is needed as the county, like communities everywhere, grapples with the recession.
NEWS
By JAMES J. LACK | August 9, 1995
As congressional Republicans move ever more aggressively to return power over social programs to the states, President Clinton and the Democratic minority would like to refocus that debate to the question: Can the states be trusted? It is, after all, the 50 governors and state legislatures who, under the Republican plan, would assume responsibility for allocating billions of dollars in block grants.To understand the controversy, start by listening to the harsh voices at the fringe. The far left argues that state officials, Neanderthals with no appreciation for civil rights or 20th century American history, will -- once off the federal leash -- abolish all welfare programs.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE WASHINGTON | September 8, 1996
WASHINGTON - The flood of men and women into America's jails and prisons continued last year, bringing their total to more than double the inmate count in 1985, the Justice Department has reported.Rapid prison population growth in recent years - reflecting a national wave of tough anti-drug laws - has strained state and federal budgets as corrections officials have raced to find bed space for 841,200 additional people since 1985, or more than 1,618 new beds every week.The Federal Bureau of Prisons operated 26 percent over capacity in 1995, while state prison systems reported operating between 14 percent and 25 percent above capacity, the new Justice Department study showed.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 30, 2009
Marjorie Benedum and her husband, Mel Harris, knew their landlord was facing foreclosure but were reassured when he said they could keep renting the Southwest Baltimore house after his family lost it. Then Harris, who is 79 and retired, came home from church three weeks ago to find a sheriff's notice on the door. Get out in 10 days, it said, or be evicted. "We weren't sure what we were going to do," recalled Benedum, 62. More and more renters have been caught up in the national foreclosure crisis, and lenders taking back those homes nearly always want them gone.
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