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By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
County Executive Robert R. Neall welcomes the additional aid promised in Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposed state budget. He just doesn't expect to see very much of it.The county would stand to gain an extra $15.5 million next fiscal year, for a total of $197.4 million. But that's just a drop in the bucket compared to the $64.4 million in cuts the county has weathered over the past two years.And better than half of the additional state money, the county executive noted, is earmarked for education.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Calling Severna Park High School "one of the highest-performing, worst facilities I've ever seen in this state," Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot said this week the state will come up with money to help Anne Arundel County Public Schools replace the aging facility — but not the $25 million the county wants this year. Franchot toured the 55-year-old high school with school officials and County Executive Laura Neuman on Monday, and said he came away convinced calls for a replacement are not unfounded.
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NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | February 20, 2008
The Anne Arundel County school board is expected today to ask for $11 million less from the county government, thanks to a an unanticipated boost in state aid. But as the board prepares to vote on -- and is expected to approve largely unchanged -- Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell's $969 million operating budget request, board President Tricia Johnson left the door open to the possibility of reinstating programs "left on the cutting room floor." Some board members have pushed for continuing the expansion of the AVID program, which provides extra tutoring and counseling to students in the "academic middle."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
The Volvo Group is expanding its 1,340-worker Hagerstown plant and plans to add more than 100 jobs there, the company announced Friday. Volvo, which makes heavy-duty engines and transmissions at the facility, anticipates a $30 million expansion. The company is upgrading the plant, centralizing some warehousing efforts and bringing back work - machining and assembly operations for Mack heavy-duty drive axles - that was handled in Hagerstown years ago but had been moved to a third-party supplier in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 2, 1996
AS MAYOR of Leonardtown, I was quite disturbed by your objections (Oct. 11, "Giveaway time in Annapolis?") to state aid for a proposed public golf course being discussed in our town.My first objection is that it is not accurate to say, as you did, that Gov. Parris Glendening ''is encouraging the developer to pursue state aid.'' When Leonardtown officials and the developer, Mark Vogel, met with the governor to brief him on the project, he made no commitments. In his follow up letter to me, the governor did say the project is ''very exciting,'' but he also said, ''I cannot commit to support any state funding for the golf course at this time.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
Harford Community College president Richard Pappas said he needed a $10 tuition increase for the spring semester to help balance a deficit created by state aid cuts.The school's Board of Trustees gave him $13 per credit hour.Board chairman Nicholas L. Gounaris said it was worth the extra $90,000 the higher fee will raise to avoid seven to eight layoffs thatwould have led to cuts in computer laboratory time, library hours and clerical support."We are not fulfilling our obligations if we are standing still or falling backward," he said.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
County Executive Eileen Rehrmann ordered department heads to trim 2 percent from their budgets last week as the first step in coping witha $6.4 million loss in state aid.But she pledged not to use the power granted last week by the General Assembly and governor allowingcounty executives to cut teacher salaries and other school spending."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
Howard County schools should not look for much more than a minimal funding increase in the coming fiscal year because of an expected squeeze on state aid, County Executive Charles I. Ecker said yesterday."
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | December 9, 1990
Anne Arundel would lose more than $3 million in state aid for county police, community college, library and other services under Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposed deficit reduction plan.Schaefer announced his strategy Thursday for cutting an additional $242.6 million from the current state budget, thus eliminating a deficit that has grown to $423 million. Those cuts include $33 million in aid to Baltimore and the 23 counties for police, community colleges, libraries and other programs.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
Harford County likely will lose $3 million to $6 million in state aid over the next six months as a result of spending cutbacks brought on by persistent budget woes, county political leaders say.That prediction cames just a few days after the Schaefer administration unveiled its plan last week to cut $40 million in aid to local governments, including $1.2 million for Harford, to balance the state budget for the fiscal year that ended June 30.Del. Donald C. Fry, D-District 35A, who sits on the House Ways and Means Committee, predicted the state would slash up to $4 million more in aid to the county, on top of the $1.2 million.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
The following letter was sent to Gov. Martin O'Malley. A copy was provided for publication. In looking at the proposed state budget and aid to local governments for FY 2014, and as I begin to craft my budget here in Harford County, I have concerns regarding the state aid projection for our public school system. Based on the projected aid for FY 2014, the state allocation for our public school system will be over $4 million less than the state aid disbursal the previous year. Harford County's reduction is the largest of the state's 24 jurisdictions.
NEWS
By Charlie Cooper and Sharon Rubinstein | January 31, 2013
When it comes to public school funding, this is a time for appreciation — but not complacency. Gov. Martin O'Malley deserves thanks for trying once more to hold the line on aid to public schools in his proposed budget, and for making a commitment to school construction funding as well. Indeed, the governor has tried to maintain both capital and operating aid to public schools despite the global economic downturn that has seriously eroded state revenues during his Administration.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | January 9, 2013
Morgan State drew within a point with three minutes left, but a technical foul for having six players on the court helped Penn make six of eight free throws in the final minute to beat the visiting Bears, 79-73, in women's basketball Tuesday night. Kathleen Roche made both free throws on the technical foul, and after a scoreless possession by Morgan, Kara Bonenberger made two free throws for a 73-68 lead with 1:31 left. Bianca Jarrett had a game-high 32 points for Morgan State (4-10)
NEWS
May 13, 2012
For the second time in his six years in office, Gov.Martin O'Malleyfinds it necessary to call a special session of the legislature to raise taxes and fees ("Deal set to raise taxes," May 10). Mr. O'Malley says it's necessary to raise the taxes on those making over $100,000 to prevent cuts on education, health programs and state employees and to prevent cuts in state aid to Baltimore City and Prince George's and Montgomery counties. These three subdivisions already receive, through the Thornton funding formula, an unfair share of state aid for schools compared to the other subdivisions based on the revenue they send to the state.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Instead of asking for a higher bottle tax to pay for school repairs, maybe Baltimore MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeshould first ask Gov.Martin O'Malleywhat happened to the millions of dollars he couldn't account for when he was mayor. If she wants to sell the city's historic properties to help fund the budget, she should be asking the governor why he didn't make needed repairs while mayor. She might ask for state aid but since the General Assembly recently passed a "doomsday budget," there probably isn't any money.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Local government and university leaders are struggling to craft spending plans amid uncertainty over the state budget — and how a package of threatened cuts might affect schools, roads, public safety and other basic services. Officials throughout Maryland are pressing lawmakers to return to Annapolis and settle budget business left unfinished when the General Assembly session ended this week. The failure to come to an agreement by Monday's deadline raised the specter of more than $500 million in reductions, much of it in local aid. "Everybody is still in shock," said William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the state university system, which would stand to lose up to $50 million — a reduction that he said could lead to a sharp tuition hike.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2000
A Baltimore judge expressed obvious support yesterday for the city's position that it should get more state school aid, but he likely will not rule until next week on the school board's petition for millions more for its reform efforts. During a three-hour hearing, Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan repeated an argument advanced by lawyers for the city school system that the state budget includes money for many discretionary items, such as $6 million for private school textbooks, but shortchanges city schools, which have a right under the state constitution to adequate funding.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and John A. Morris and Robert Lee and John A. Morris,Staff writers | January 22, 1991
The governor has proposed spending $53.4 million in state money for county capital projects, with approximately 80 percent of that going for courts, prisons and parking facilities.Schools and social programs in the county appeared to get the short end of the budget stick, accounting for only about 6 percent of the proposed grants.Statewide, Gov. William Donald Schaefer's $815.5 million capital budget was reduced by $40 million over last year. Eleven percent of the budget was earmarked for public safety, 26 percent for education.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
State aid to public schools and universities could be slashed, 500 state jobs abolished and local law enforcement grants eliminated under a "doomsday" budget prepared for the Maryland Senate to show the impact of a budget balanced without tax increases. The budget cutting would especially be hard on Baltimore, which would lose almost $75 million in state aid — including $34 million for education and $10 million for law enforcement. The $720 million in cuts are part of what Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller has called a doomsday budget, prepared for the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee as an alternative to Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to raise about $300 million in additional revenue, largely through an increase in the income taxes paid by Marylanders earning $100,000 or more.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blaketold Baltimore lawmakers Friday morning that any shift of the state's teacher pension costs to local governments must take into account the relative wealth of the jurisdiction -- saying the failure to do so is her "biggest disappointment" with Gov.Martin O'Malley's plan for a 50-50 split. The mayor said she would prefer not to see any shift of pension costs from the state, which now pays 100 percent of the tab, to the 23 counties and Baltimore. However, she said she understood that the state faces its own budget challenges and that the change has been coming a long time.
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