Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStasi
IN THE NEWS

Stasi

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | April 3, 2007
BERLIN -- On a glorious, sunny day in Germany's reunited capital, I found myself in the dimness of the Stasi museum - a two-story concrete building that exhibits the tools that East Germany's secret police used to spy on its citizens. I came to this museum because I was impelled by the German movie The Lives of Others, which just won the Oscar for best foreign film. It offers a chilling and emotionally powerful portrait of Stasi surveillance of a fictional writer and artist couple. Directed by a young West German named Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, the movie is drawing huge crowds here, even though it's been 17 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Houppert and Karen Houppert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2009
I Am My Own Wife is the true (or not) story of a man (or not) who survived the Nazis and resisted the East German Stasi (or didn't) to live as a transvestite for more than 30 years in Berlin, ultimately becoming the darling of the European press after the Berlin Wall came down. Confused? A precision performance by Everyman Theatre's Bruce Nelson actually makes all of this abundantly clear as he plays Berlin's most famous transvestite, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf - and the 34 other characters in playwright Doug Wright's one-person show.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | January 31, 1991
LONDON -- Iraqi agents were trained by the former East German secret police to use chemical and biological weapons against civilian targets and are now positioned to launch a terror campaign in the West, according to a usually reliable television documentary shown in Britain last night.The documentary, compiled after a six-month investigation into Iraq's chemical weapons capabilities, suggested that targets could include water supplies or crowded public areas such as metro stations and airports.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | April 3, 2007
BERLIN -- On a glorious, sunny day in Germany's reunited capital, I found myself in the dimness of the Stasi museum - a two-story concrete building that exhibits the tools that East Germany's secret police used to spy on its citizens. I came to this museum because I was impelled by the German movie The Lives of Others, which just won the Oscar for best foreign film. It offers a chilling and emotionally powerful portrait of Stasi surveillance of a fictional writer and artist couple. Directed by a young West German named Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, the movie is drawing huge crowds here, even though it's been 17 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special Correspondent | February 11, 1992
BERLIN -- History took an ironic twist in a courtroom here yesterday.The defendant was once the second most powerful man in the brutal East German Communist regime that died three years ago. His accusers have been dead even longer. They were Adolf Hitler's henchmen.Brought to the courtroom yesterday was Erich Mielke, the now-frail old man who directed East Germany's dreaded secret police -- the Stasi -- from 1957 to the collapse of the Communist regime in 1989.But the crime he is accused of has nothing to do with the 40 years he ran the Stasi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Houppert and Karen Houppert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2009
I Am My Own Wife is the true (or not) story of a man (or not) who survived the Nazis and resisted the East German Stasi (or didn't) to live as a transvestite for more than 30 years in Berlin, ultimately becoming the darling of the European press after the Berlin Wall came down. Confused? A precision performance by Everyman Theatre's Bruce Nelson actually makes all of this abundantly clear as he plays Berlin's most famous transvestite, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf - and the 34 other characters in playwright Doug Wright's one-person show.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | November 27, 1991
BERLIN -- The then-East German Stasi secret police helped Libya organize the 1988 bombing of a jumbo jet over the Scottish town of Lockerbie, a well-placed Stasi officer says.But it is not believed that the nation's leaders knew anything of this activity.The officer and experts in the field also believe that the Stasi -- East Germany's secret police and intelligence service, which has since been disbanded -- made the attack and other acts of terrorism possible through years of organizational help, training and logistics for Libyan agents.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | February 21, 1995
BERLIN -- Peek inside the great, gray empire of Joachim Gauck and you will find the petty gleanings of 170,000 neighborhood snoops, plus reams of other information gathered during four decades by East Germany's Ministry for State Security, or Stasi.Open this empire to public scrutiny and you will begin to see why, to some people, Mr. Gauck has become the most feared bureaucrat in Germany, as well as a symbol for lingering east-west division.Revelations from the files have been embarrassing prominent Germans and destroying careers for more than three years.
NEWS
October 31, 2003
On October 25, 2003, DAVID WAYNE; beloved son of Eileen Constantine of Ocean City, MD, and her husband John; loving son of the late Joseph Kutchka Sr.; dear brother of Ronald Kutchka, Rosalie Zielinski, Debra Stasi, Elaine Holroy, Kathleen Murray, Pattie Schattner and the late Norman and Joseph Kutchka Jr. A Graveside Service will be held at Oak Lawn Cemetery on Monday, November 3 at 1 P.M.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 15, 1995
BERLIN -- When a television station announced recently that it would broadcast a special program that evening featuring Lutz Bertram, high ratings were all but guaranteed.The station, ORB, is one of the principal news sources in eastern Germany, and the acid-tongued Mr. Bertram is its most popular moderator.But instead of being treated to one of his biting interviews with the famous, fans were stunned by a rambling confession in which he acknowledged having been an informer for the East German secret police in the 1980s.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 9, 2007
The life of the theater gives The Lives of Others its spark, verve and profundity. Even fans of Pan's Labyrinth (like me) may leave thinking this movie deserved its best foreign-language film Oscar. This excitingly thoughtful suspense film takes place in 1984, in an East Germany that plagiarizes Orwell's 1984. The secret police, or Stasi, rule a network of agents and informers that puts the whole state on the wire. It's difficult even for the country's leading playwright, Georg Dreyman (Sebastian Koch)
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 6, 2006
BERLIN -- More than 16 years after the wall fell, West Berlin and East Berlin have melded together enough that a visitor wandering around the city often can't tell which was which. But at a dingy gray building surrounded by concrete walls topped with barbed wire, there is no escaping the creepy feel of communism. This was a prison run by the East German secret police, the Stasi, which has been preserved as a memorial to the crimes of the past. Our guide today is a paternal figure with the learned air of a retired college professor.
NEWS
October 31, 2003
On October 25, 2003, DAVID WAYNE; beloved son of Eileen Constantine of Ocean City, MD, and her husband John; loving son of the late Joseph Kutchka Sr.; dear brother of Ronald Kutchka, Rosalie Zielinski, Debra Stasi, Elaine Holroy, Kathleen Murray, Pattie Schattner and the late Norman and Joseph Kutchka Jr. A Graveside Service will be held at Oak Lawn Cemetery on Monday, November 3 at 1 P.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Canfield and By Kevin Canfield,Special to the Sun | March 23, 2003
In the past several days, TV viewers have been hit with a barrage of information about troop preparedness and movement, the range and accuracy of American missiles, the speed and armament of our military aircraft. War is a learning experience for the American public, and in this way it is no different from any number of local disasters and global calamities that force us to comprehend volumes of new information. Be it the recent space shuttle explosion, the brutal realities of 21st-century warfare or something as relatively inconsequential as a computer virus, many of us only learn about technology, science or geography when something goes awry.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond and Elizabeth Pond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 1999
LEIPZIG, Germany -- When Valentine Kosch went out to demonstrate that chilly October evening in Leipzig 10 years ago, she was fully prepared to be shot. If she did not return by 10 p.m., her husband was to assume the worst and take the two girls to their grandmother in Dresden to start a new life.As she said goodbye to her 6-year-old and 3-year-old, perhaps for the last time, Kosch did not tell them all this, of course. She explained to the elder child that she was walking around the city's inner ring with some friends so that teachers would be nicer to their pupils.
TOPIC
By Robert Gerald Livingston | January 3, 1999
WITH THE communist German Democratic Republic falling apart in late 1989 and 1990, the CIA was suddenly presented with an extraordinary opportunity to acquire the operational files of the government's foreign-espionage service. Whether a Russian or an East German sold the files to Americans remains a mystery, but the price for what has come to be known as Operation Rosewood is said to have been $1 million to $1.5 million. The files were shipped to CIA headquarters in Langley, Va.For the money, the agency got an invaluable trove: three separate card files listing most, if probably not all, agents of the Hauptverwaltung Aufklaerung, or HVA, the foreign-espionage division of the Ministry for State Security, otherwise known as the Stasi.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1992
POTSDAM, Germany -- One eastern German politician after another has fallen from grace in the face of revelations from the recently opened files of the Stasi, East Germany's once-dreaded secret police.The implications of the files that prominent revolutionaries were too close to the Stasi have had the same effect that charges of sexual promiscuity appear to have on U.S. politicians.But humiliation here is shared by most East Germans, who believe that westerners have no concept of what was necessary to survive in an authoritarian regime.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
"The File," by Timothy Garton Ash. Random House. 224 pages. (( $23.The Stasi were most sinister in their ordinariness.In East Germany, the police made their presence known. They stopped cars and searched the trains. They walked muzzled, leashed dogs past the tourists. But not the Stasi, the secret police with their vast network of informers. Their terrifying power came from being indistinguishable. Anyone might be a spy - the baker, the bus driver, the next-door neighbor.As it turned out, many were.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
"The File," by Timothy Garton Ash. Random House. 224 pages. (( $23.The Stasi were most sinister in their ordinariness.In East Germany, the police made their presence known. They stopped cars and searched the trains. They walked muzzled, leashed dogs past the tourists. But not the Stasi, the secret police with their vast network of informers. Their terrifying power came from being indistinguishable. Anyone might be a spy - the baker, the bus driver, the next-door neighbor.As it turned out, many were.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | February 21, 1995
BERLIN -- Peek inside the great, gray empire of Joachim Gauck and you will find the petty gleanings of 170,000 neighborhood snoops, plus reams of other information gathered during four decades by East Germany's Ministry for State Security, or Stasi.Open this empire to public scrutiny and you will begin to see why, to some people, Mr. Gauck has become the most feared bureaucrat in Germany, as well as a symbol for lingering east-west division.Revelations from the files have been embarrassing prominent Germans and destroying careers for more than three years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.