Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStarvation
IN THE NEWS

Starvation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 1, 2010
Closing arguments are expected Tuesday in the Baltimore trial of three alleged cult members accused of starving a toddler to death because he didn't pray properly. The defendants, who are representing themselves, rested their cases within minutes Monday without calling any witnesses. They face decades in prison if convicted. All are charged with child abuse resulting in death, which carries a maximum 30-year penalty, for depriving 16-month-old Javon Thompson of food and water.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Waves of refugees arrive daily to Kenya, some having walked weeks through unforgiving desert with virtually no possessions, and yet local relief workers report optimism among the millions threatened by the historic famine and drought spreading through the Horn of Africa. "Everyone looks hungry and wiped out," said Bruce White, a Catholic Relief Services adviser who returned earlier this month from Kenya. "But there is a sense of hope because there is help. I asked one man what he wanted here and he said 'peace.'" Jonathan Ernst, a Baltimore freelance photojournalist, reached the refugee camps in eastern Kenya last week and is reporting to Lutheran World Relief.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 3, 1992
Finding ways to feed Somalia deserves the support of all United Nations members. The United States has properly signed on to this newly approved U.N. mission. Anarchy, feuding and robbery have replaced tyranny in Somalia. This has impeded private relief agencies from feeding the starving. Walking skeletons trek by the hundreds of thousands to Kenya, which cannot feed them. Or they become unwanted boat people in desolate Yemen. The world has looked the other way.That said, the U.N. Security Council resolution marked an intriguing precedent.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
More than 35 horses, cows, bulls and goats rescued in near-starving condition Thursday from a Garrett County farm have been taken to farms in western Howard County. The horses, which were taken to Days End Rescue Farm in Woodbine, are straining the ability of that facility to care for them. Days End took 26 horses, according to Sue Mitchell, development director for the mostly volunteer, 58-acre farm off Frederick Road, and a farm across the street took the cows, bulls and goats temporarily, she said.
NEWS
September 17, 1991
The city school system is distributing video cassettes explaining the reasons some 20 million Africans are suffering from malnourishment and starvation.The cassettes are issued with teachers' lesson guides so they can be used in city and county school classrooms. Distribution of the tapes is tied to the Walk Against Hunger in Africa, scheduled Oct. 26.The walk is sponsored by Baltimore Clergy and Laity Concerned and co-sponsored by Fox 45 WBFF-TV, radio station WXYV-FM V-103 and the Baltimore Times newspaper.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 18, 1992
DAVEL, South Africa -- Koos Duur knelt on a patch of the fertile soil that for years has put the milled white corn known here as pap on the tables of millions of black families in southern Africa. His chapped hand grasped a stalk, which crumbled into dust at his touch."If we can survive this year," the 54-year-old farmer said later, lighting a cigarette, "then I think we will be able to stay in farming. But this year is our crossroads."One of the worst droughts in African history -- even more devastating than the 1984 drought in Ethiopia and Sudan -- has blotted out most of the grain crop across a wide area of southern Africa, from Zambia and Malawi to Zimbabwe and South Africa.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 7, 1992
NEW YORK -- For many of the Somalis closest to starvation, the U.S.-led military intervention might simply be too late.According to relief experts and medical specialists, the famine in Somalia has now gone so far that the worst cases might only be saved with intravenous feeding, which would be impossible to ++ set up on a large enough scale, soon enough, to do much good.After weeks and months of starvation, the experts said, the human body's energy reserves get so low, the immune system becomes so weak, and the fluids become so unbalanced that intervention is often too late.
NEWS
By Kristin Huckshorn and Kristin Huckshorn,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 24, 1992
BARDERA, Somalia -- The main street is quiet.No babies cry.Only a handful of children, all boys, play in the road, using sticks and rocks for toys.Today, when U.S. Marines plan to arrive at this southwestern outpost in Somalia's hardest-hit famine zone, they will find silent testimony that, for many children here, help comes too late."
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
MACHAZE, Mozambique -- Filimone Ntembapa had only two choices after the rains failed to come this year. He could move his family while they were still strong enough to walk, or he could watch them starve.The 51-year-old tribal chief already had seen many of his people flee the village of Butiro in search of food, and he knew the time had come for him to go too.So last month he packed up his two wives and six children and led them out of Butiro on a dangerous nighttime flight through rebel-held territory to this government-controlled town.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
After a spirited hour of debate that prompted lawmakers to reflect on their ethnic histories, the Maryland Senate gave preliminary approval yesterday to a bill that would require public BTC schools to teach children about the Irish potato famine.The 26-18 vote came after the bill's sponsor, Sen. Perry Sfikas, accused educators of negligence in failing to include any mention of the 1845-1850 mass starvation in school curriculums.The bill, which is opposed by state education officials, is expected to receive final Senate approval and be sent to the House for consideration.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
Closing arguments are expected today in the Baltimore trial of three alleged cult members accused of starving a toddler to death because he didn't pray properly. The defendants, who are representing themselves, rested their cases within minutes Monday without calling any witnesses. They face decades in prison if convicted. All are charged with child abuse resulting in death, which carries a maximum 30-year penalty, for depriving 16-month-old Javon Thompson of food and water.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 2, 2010
A Baltimore jury on Tuesday afternoon convicted three alleged cult members on charges of first-degree child abuse resulting in death and second-degree murder for starving a 16-month-old boy in their city apartment because he did not say "amen" before meals. Prosecutors argued that the defendants showed the "height of maliciousness" in not feeding Javon Thompson as punishment, even if they never intended the boy's death, which happened slowly and painfully over days. "His skin discolored, his eyes sunk in, his lips got chapped," Assistant State's Attorney Patricia McLane told the jury during her closing arguments Tuesday.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 1, 2010
Closing arguments are expected Tuesday in the Baltimore trial of three alleged cult members accused of starving a toddler to death because he didn't pray properly. The defendants, who are representing themselves, rested their cases within minutes Monday without calling any witnesses. They face decades in prison if convicted. All are charged with child abuse resulting in death, which carries a maximum 30-year penalty, for depriving 16-month-old Javon Thompson of food and water.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
A woman who once lived with three people accused of leading a cult testified Thursday that they committed her to a mental hospital to keep her quiet about a toddler's starvation death. Danielle Smith, 26, said she tried to alert neighbors to the boy's death but couldn't because she was not left alone with outsiders. The three defendants - Toni Sloan, who's known in court as Queen Antoinette, 41; her daughter, Trevia Williams, 22; and acquaintance Marcus Cobbs, 23 - have pleaded not guilty to murder charges.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 24, 2010
The accused cult leader known as Queen Antoinette, charged with murder in a toddler's starvation death, once tried to prevent another baby from being fed, according to that child's mother, who testified Tuesday that she was manipulated into giving up her maternal duties. To stay in the religious household run by Queen Antoinette, residents "had to be broken, and you were slightly reprogrammed," said 23-year-old Tiffany Smith. Smith once lived rent-free with several others in the home, which she described as peaceful yet controlling.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 23, 2010
Prosecutors outlined a tale of demons, death and attempted resurrection Monday during opening statements of a child-murder trial that promises to be among the strangest the Baltimore City Circuit Court has ever seen, because of both its substance and its style. The three defendants, all alleged to be cult members, have declined attorneys and are representing themselves against charges they starved a willful baby to death because he wouldn't say "amen" after meals. The trial is expected to involve testimony from the child's mother, who prayed over his body for days in the hopes he would come back to life.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | June 19, 2008
Before leaving the University of Notre Dame for a two-week trip to Ethiopia and Kenya, I was concerned about the rising food prices worldwide. Having grown up in Hong Kong eating rice each day, I was particularly worried by the threefold increase in the price of rice - the staple food for about 3 billion people worldwide. My concern took on a new intensity when I arrived in East Africa and began touring projects supported by Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services. In Africa, the rise in global food prices doesn't mean forgoing a night out on the town or passing up a pair of shoes on sale.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 17, 2010
Queen Antoinette - aka Toni Sloan or Toni Ellsberry - sat at a defense table Tuesday and grimaced every time she heard a statement she didn't like, particularly those containing the words "cult" or "commune." Her actions irked Assistant Public Defender Maureen Rowland, representing one of Antoinette's co-defendants in a bizarre homicide case that involves the alleged starvation death of a toddler. Antoinette's side comments during the motions hearing are "just one small thing that is going to come up over and over and over again," Rowland argued before Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy Doory as she sought a separate trial for her client.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.