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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
Carroll schools will continue to start the academic year before Labor Day, if the proposed calendar for 1999-2000 is adopted by the school board.Students will return to school Aug. 23 -- two weeks before the traditional end-of-summer holiday -- and finish the year June 2, according to the calendar presented at Wednesday's board meeting.Parents have criticized the early opening, saying it interferes with vacation plans and that students are uncomfortable in schools without air conditioning.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Johns Hopkins isn't the only area Division III program with an untarnished record in 2014. Stevenson is 4-0 overall and 3-0 in the Middle Atlantic Conference and earned votes in the latest American Football Coaches Association poll. It's the first time the program has won its first four games of the season, and the team has already matched single-season records in overall victories and league wins set last year. Considering that the Mustangs were 8-22 overall and 6-20 in the conference, the current run might be shocking to some, but not to coach Ed Hottle.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1997
Edith Gentry insists she changes nothing for the sake of change.That's for sure.Freshly graduated from college in 1947, she started the Cedarcroft School in North Baltimore with money borrowed from her accountant father. A half-century later at 72, she's still the headmistress, and little has changed at the preschool for children 3 to 6.The 70 youngsters and their nine teachers still gather at 9: 15 a.m. for opening exercises heavily flavored with patriotism. Gentry sits at the piano, accompanying the children in "America" and "Three Cheers for the Red, White and Blue" as a color guard of tots circles the room bearing American, Maryland and school flags.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
A post-Labor Day start for Maryland public schools is a very good idea ( "Late start a non-starter," Sept. 2). It is also the recommendation of a state task force appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and which included public school teachers, parents of students in public elementary, middle and high schools as well as members of the General Assembly. Much like members of a jury, task force members gave full consideration to the positions of supporters and opponents of this concept.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
A proposal to open schools before Labor Day this fall brought just two critics to a public hearing Thursday on the 1992-1993 school calendar.The speakers who objected to starting school before Labor Daysaid the early start would interfere with summer vacations and couldlimit summer job opportunities for students whose employers require commitments through Labor Day.Starting school before Labor Day will increase absenteeism, predicted Stephanie Brown, who...
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1998
In response to parents' concerns, the Carroll Board of Education yesterday scrapped a proposed calendar for next school year and drafted a blueprint calling for schools to start one week before Labor Day instead of two.Other suggested calendar changes for the 1999-2000 academic year include the elimination of late start and early dismissal days and shifting the placement of unused snow days, which are typically used as extra vacation days.Under the plan agreed to by the board, schools could start next year Aug. 30 and finish June 9.The board did not vote on a new calendar, but directed staff to study the changes before its next meeting Jan. 13.Board members were supposed to vote yesterday on a proposed 1999-2000 calendar -- with the first day of school Aug. 23 and the last day June 2. But during the residents' participation portion of the meeting, several parents strongly criticized that schedule.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | August 18, 1999
When parents help their children prepare for school, they are opening doors to a new, exciting world, and building the foundation for a lifetime of learning. Here are a few suggestions to initiate now:Getting ready* Begin to develop a daily routine for school by gradually setting earlier bed and wake-up times.* Set aside time each day for quiet reading or writing activities, and gradually shorten the TV and video game time.* Visit your child's school for a brief walk-through the week before school opens.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | September 1, 1992
Q: My 9-year-old is beginning to worry about starting school. I can tell because he is quieter and seems to be thinking a lot. He doesn't talk about school much; he says it's a long way off. I'm surprised that he's worried because he seemed to have such a good time in fourth grade and he'll be going to fifth grade in the same school. What shall I do?A: As children get older, they begin to keep track of the calendar just as adults do. It's impossible for them to ignore the approach of the school year.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1998
In response to parents' concerns, the Carroll Board of Education scrapped yesterday a proposed calendar for next school year and drafted a blueprint calling for schools to start one week before Labor Day instead of two.Other suggested calendar changes for the 1999-2000 academic year include the elimination of late-start and early dismissal days and shifting the placement of unused snow days, which are typically used as extra vacation days.Under the plan agreed to by the board, schools could start Aug. 30 and finish June 9, 2000.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1998
In response to parents' concerns, the Carroll Board of Education yesterday scrapped a proposed calendar for next school year and drafted a blueprint calling for schools to start one week before Labor Day instead of two.Other suggested calendar changes for the 1999-2000 academic year include the elimination of late start and early dismissal days and shifting the placement of unused snow days, which are typically used as extra vacation days.Under the plan agreed to by the board, schools could start next year Aug. 30 and finish June 9.The board did not vote on a new calendar but directed staff to study the changes before its next meeting Jan. 13. The board may not take an official vote on the calendar until its February meeting.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Hannah Sheats raises goats, makes clothes and bakes items with the 4-H to show at the Maryland State Fair. But the 11-year-old Parkton girl hasn't been to the State Fairgrounds in Timonium as much as she'd like since Baltimore County public schools opened Wednesday. Hannah, who attends Hereford Middle School, thinks she'd be learning more at the fair. "At school, in the first couple of weeks you don't do anything. It's kind of pointless," she said. "With 4-H, you always learn something new. You never stop.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
OCEAN CITY - Squinting into the August sun at Ocean City's boardwalk Thursday, Comptroller Peter Franchot formally launched his petition drive to require Maryland schools to start after Labor Day. Franchot wants to deliver 10,000 signatures under the banner “Let Summer Be Summer” to Maryland lawmakers in January, when he will kick off lobbying for a new law that would forbid school districts from beginning classes before September. While the petition itself is symbolic, it continues the state comptroller's more than yearlong campaign to push back the first day of school.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baltimore school officials are working to fill hundreds of teacher vacancies in the weeks before the school year starts, according to information presented to the school board Tuesday. With less than one month before the first day of school Aug. 25, the district was actively recruiting teachers to fill 211 vacancies. The high-need areas are in science, math, and special education. The city's number of vacancies far exceeds other area districts. In Baltimore County, which recently held a large job fair, officials reported 32 teacher vacancies, and Anne Arundel currently has 88. City school officials did not respond to inquiries about this year's vacancies.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A task force assigned to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland schools will recommend to Gov. Martin O'Malley that the summer break be extended, a measure that has been embraced by one Eastern Shore school district but opposed by most of the state's superintendents. State officials said that a task force, convened by the Maryland General Assembly last year to study the issue, voted 11-4 this week to recommend that schools open after Labor Day, a move that has been championed by Comptroller Peter Franchot for its economic benefits to local businesses and the state's tourism industry.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Maryland State Superintendent of Schools Lillian Lowery said Tuesday that school districts across the state should be allowed to determine for themselves when to start classes after summer break, whether it's before or after Labor Day. Lowery said districts now have the autonomy to start the school year when they see fit and she doesn't want a statewide initiative mandating a post-Labor Day start for all districts. The superintendent spoke in Anne Arundel County at a meeting of a task force considering starting the school year after Labor Day. The Task Force to Study a Post Labor Day Start Date was created by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly during last year's Annapolis session to study whether the tourism industry would get a boost if public schools start after Labor Day. Greg Shockley, chairman of the Maryland Tourism Development Board, said pushing back the start of school would not only benefit tourism, but also education through tax revenue.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Saturday's 2-1 win in double overtime against George Washington helped the UMBC men's soccer team tie the second-best start in school history - a 9-0-0 record that the 2009 squad posted. The Retrievers, who are ranked No. 11 in the most recent Continental Tire/National Soccer Coaches Association of America Coaches' poll, are also in the midst of an 18-game unbeaten streak (15-0-3) that is the longest since the 2009 team went 19-0-2 in the regular season. Those accolades are nice, but coach Pete Caringi Jr. more is at stake than just a winning streak.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
Dorothy Seward Kratz, a retired city kindergarten teacher who taught in the same Park Heights school - and classroom - for 40 years, died in her sleep Saturday at Country Companion, a Taneytown assisted-living home. The former Randallstown resident was 94. Former pupils said Miss Kratz introduced school to generations of Northwest Baltimore children who learned their ABCs and numbers from her at the old Louisa May Alcott School No. 59 at Reisterstown Road and Keyworth Avenue. Born in Baltimore and raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1926 graduate of Western High School and earned her teaching diploma two years later at what is now Towson University.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
Your recent editorial significantly minimized the need to explore a post-Labor Day start to Maryland's public school calendar ( "One week and counting," Aug. 19). It was disappointing that The Sun would issue such a dismissive opinion without first giving the task force established earlier this year by the General Assembly a chance to comprehensively study this proposal and issue a report. With Maryland's unique natural bounty, our state provides families with countless opportunities to spend the last weeks of August exploring the scenic mountains of Western Maryland, taking advantage of the richness of the Chesapeake Bay or enjoying time together on the beautiful shoreline in Ocean City . While the $74.3 million in direct economic activity that is lost by starting schools in August may not seem significant to some, a couple weeks of lost or diminished revenue can often be "make or break" for many family-owned businesses.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Heubeck | August 27, 2013
The office of Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot recently released a report suggesting that Maryland students start school after Labor Day so that families can take one last summer-fling vacation, thereby giving the state a nearly $75 million economic boost. I haven't crunched any numbers on the topic but, as a parent with school-age children, I believe the report's glowing financial projections fail to take into account several factors that work against this predicted surge in tourism-related dollars.
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