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By Kevin Baxter, Tribune Newspapers | June 21, 2010
Ryan Appell stood on an isolated stretch of highway on the outskirts of an old South African mining town dressed like Betsy Ross' worst nightmare. He wore a bandana and a scarf made from a U.S. flag, had a flag tied around his neck and carried another in his hands. "This," he says with a smile, "is me." Apparently, it's a lot of other Americans, too, because the U.S. soccer team's fan base, which once consisted primarily of friends and family members, has swelled into one of the largest contingents at this World Cup. According to FIFA, the world governing body for soccer, only South Africa bought more tickets to this World Cup than the U.S. And while some of the 136,500 tickets sold in the U.S -- more than the number sold in Germany, Italy, France, Mexico and Brazil combined -- were undoubtedly purchased by fans who came here to root for one of the 31 other teams in the tournament, Appell was hardly the only American fan who made the difficult trip halfway around the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
To get your Fourth of July off to a swinging step, I just had to share what must be the coolest version of John Philip Sousa's famous march "Stars and Stripes Forever. " Recorded in 1939, this brilliantly swinging blast from the past is by the big band of Baltimore's own Chick Webb, one of the greatest talents in jazz history. Crank up the volume and set your patriotic toes tappin'.   
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NEWS
By Mark Franek | January 10, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - The appearance of flags in the immediate aftermath of Sept. 11 was a sincere expression of America's best qualities. The Stars and Stripes symbolized our resolve to remove the rubble and galvanized our vigilance for peace and order and our readiness for war. Already we have become more appreciative and committed to what we are trying to protect. Not even Osama bin Laden at his most "pessimistic" could have foreseen this unintended side effect. But (am I the first person to say it?
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Cornell has placed its men's lacrosse team on temporary suspension and canceled all "fall ball" competitions pending an investigation into a hazing incident last Friday, the school said today in a statement. The penalty was due to allegations of "coerced consumption of alcohol by underage freshmen," according to multiple reports. According to LaxPower, the Big Red was scheduled to play the Iroquois Nationals on Sept. 29 in Cortland, N.Y., and in the Capital Lacrosse Classic in Bethesda on Oct. 13; the latter event is a fundraiser for the foundation honoring former Cornell player George Boiardi , who died after being struck in the chest by a lacrosse ball during a 2004 game against Binghamton.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - At the Academy of Music in Philadelphia on May 14, 1897, John Philip Sousa gave what was billed as the premiere of his march "The Stars and Stripes Forever."Actually, the piece had been played several times before that, according to Loras Schissel, Sousa expert at the Library of Congress. Sousa would often test out a piece in smaller cities, Schissel said. Then "he'd wait until he'd get to a larger city and hit the papers and say, 'I'm premiering my piece here.' "In any case, the Philadelphia audience greeted it with what the Philadelphia Post called "unbounded enthusiasm."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Star-Spangled Banner lies like a patient, immobile on an operating table, when the rescue team arrives. Four women dressed in scrubs step across a decontamination mat and, within reach of medical instruments, get to work on the tattered icon. This is history's operating room. They are the surgeons. The conservators, as they are known, wear no jewelry. Their hair does not fall loose. They have no buttons that snag, no zippers that catch. Pens are outlawed, buckles are banned, long nails are taboo.
FEATURES
May 23, 2006
History Living flag About 3,000 students will join together at Fort McHenry, 2400 E. Fort Ave., from 9 a.m. to noon today to form the Liv ing American Flag. The chil dren raise colored squares over their heads to make the 15 stars and stripes flag that flew over Fort McHenry during its battle. Free. Call 410-962-4290.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 20, 2011
Defense officials cut the ribbon Thursday on a $67 million facility to house the military's news and information operations at Fort Meade. The Defense Media Activity, established in 2008, consolidates the former Soldiers Media Center, Naval Media Center, Marine Corps News, Air Force News Service and American Forces Information Service into a single organization. It also includes the Stars and Stripes newspaper and the Defense Information School. Roughly 600 military and civilian employees and contractors moved into the building during the summer, officials said in a release.
NEWS
November 25, 2008
Stars and Stripes also once symbolized racism I found the rationalization of the actions of Johns Hopkins University officials in the editorial "A civil action" (Nov. 21) a bit disingenuous. Certainly, the flags of the Confederacy were, at a time in our history, connected to racial oppression. But the Stars and Stripes was also, for a while, the banner of a nation that recognized slavery and constitutionally recognized its victims as only three-fifths of a person. Both were part of our history.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 19, 2003
The Defense Information School at Fort Meade dedicated its library yesterday to the memory of Army Staff Sgt. Paul David Savanuck, a military photographer and Baltimore native who died in 1969 while covering the war in Vietnam. The 21,000-volume library houses books, videos and other reference materials for the military journalists and press officers the school trains. Savanuck, 23, had put down his camera to help a wounded soldier on the night of April 18, 1969, when he was killed by enemy fire near Cam Lo in South Vietnam.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
I attended and enjoyed Sunday's fabulous performance by theU.S. Navy's Blue Angels and other crack units of the American military in Baltimore. The weather was perfect, the crowd friendly, and the narration was, for the most part, as on target as the Navy jet. I was astonished, however, when the narrator interjected a gratuitous swipe at the Fourth Estate and non-military citizens in general. To the best of my recollection, the quote I refer to declaimed as follows: "It is the soldier, not the reporter, who stands for and protects our freedom.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 20, 2011
Defense officials cut the ribbon Thursday on a $67 million facility to house the military's news and information operations at Fort Meade. The Defense Media Activity, established in 2008, consolidates the former Soldiers Media Center, Naval Media Center, Marine Corps News, Air Force News Service and American Forces Information Service into a single organization. It also includes the Stars and Stripes newspaper and the Defense Information School. Roughly 600 military and civilian employees and contractors moved into the building during the summer, officials said in a release.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
A good deal of blood was spilled on both sides. … It was one battle from the President Street Depo —- to the Camden Street depot — I can say no more. Baltimorean Catherine N. Smith, April 1861 One week after the bloodless bombardment and gentlemanly surrender of Fort Sumter, the butchery that would become the Civil War began in Baltimore. On April 19, 1861, the first 16 of more than 620,000 Americans who would perish in that conflict fell along the city waterfront as a pro-Southern mob clashed with a regiment of Massachusetts volunteers answering Abraham Lincoln's call to defend the nation's capital.
SPORTS
By Kevin Baxter, Tribune Newspapers | June 21, 2010
Ryan Appell stood on an isolated stretch of highway on the outskirts of an old South African mining town dressed like Betsy Ross' worst nightmare. He wore a bandana and a scarf made from a U.S. flag, had a flag tied around his neck and carried another in his hands. "This," he says with a smile, "is me." Apparently, it's a lot of other Americans, too, because the U.S. soccer team's fan base, which once consisted primarily of friends and family members, has swelled into one of the largest contingents at this World Cup. According to FIFA, the world governing body for soccer, only South Africa bought more tickets to this World Cup than the U.S. And while some of the 136,500 tickets sold in the U.S -- more than the number sold in Germany, Italy, France, Mexico and Brazil combined -- were undoubtedly purchased by fans who came here to root for one of the 31 other teams in the tournament, Appell was hardly the only American fan who made the difficult trip halfway around the world.
NEWS
May 23, 2010
ANNAPOLIS — The Rev. Richardson Libby certainly has an unflagging dedication to history. Thanks to his perseverance, the right version of the Stars and Stripes is hanging inside the State House rotunda. Libby, who lives across the street from the Hammond-Harwood House in Annapolis, discovered that the flag thought to be an accurate reproduction of one made in 1783 was incorrect. The blue field of 13 eight-point stars should have been vertical instead of horizontal. He worked with historians to rectify the situation over a period of several years, and the corrected banner was unveiled on Flag Day 2009.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
Sgt. 1st Class Rosalyn D. Peterkin knows how to handle high-stress work. She has twice been deployed to Iraq. She has earned a reputation at Fort Meade, her home military base, as a top-flight volunteer counselor for at-risk teens. She has raised three kids as a single mother. But ask Peterkin, 36, an instructor at the Defense Information School on the base, about what she does in her limited spare time, and she can barely conceal her emotions. "I don't care what the occasion is, who requested us or if I have to get up at 3 in the morning," says Peterkin, the leader of a tightly knit outfit, the DINFOS Color Guard, whose job is to present Old Glory and four service flags at public events in displays of precision pageantry.
NEWS
May 23, 2010
ANNAPOLIS — The Rev. Richardson Libby certainly has an unflagging dedication to history. Thanks to his perseverance, the right version of the Stars and Stripes is hanging inside the State House rotunda. Libby, who lives across the street from the Hammond-Harwood House in Annapolis, discovered that the flag thought to be an accurate reproduction of one made in 1783 was incorrect. The blue field of 13 eight-point stars should have been vertical instead of horizontal. He worked with historians to rectify the situation over a period of several years, and the corrected banner was unveiled on Flag Day 2009.
NEWS
May 17, 1997
IT CERTAINLY can't be classified as a boom -- not yet, anyway -- but Maryland's economy is showing encouraging signs of leaving its post-recession doldrums far behind.Data from the year's first quarter shows solid gains in a number of important economic categories.Take job growth, for instance. It was up 2.5 percent in the first quarter, nearly 40 percent higher than state revenue estimates.Wages began to pick up, too, especially in higher-paying industries and in higher-paying categories.
NEWS
November 25, 2008
Stars and Stripes also once symbolized racism I found the rationalization of the actions of Johns Hopkins University officials in the editorial "A civil action" (Nov. 21) a bit disingenuous. Certainly, the flags of the Confederacy were, at a time in our history, connected to racial oppression. But the Stars and Stripes was also, for a while, the banner of a nation that recognized slavery and constitutionally recognized its victims as only three-fifths of a person. Both were part of our history.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun Reporter | March 19, 2007
Charles A. Frainie, a writer and World War II veteran, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at his home in Hixson, Tenn. He was 81. Born and raised in Baltimore County's Rodgers Forge neighborhood, Mr. Frainie graduated from Loyola High School in 1943. He enlisted in the Army Air Forces and served as a tail-gunner on a B-24 bomber. In 1944, his plane was shot down over Germany. He escaped to England with the help of French underground forces, said his son Mike Frainie of Reisterstown.
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