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NEWS
By Thomas Oliphant | August 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Trent Lott started it back in March. He got no bandwagon rolling -- the Senate majority leader rarely does -- but the idea of Congress officially condemning President Clinton's behavior, assuming it doesn't include an actual and proved abuse of his office, such as obstruction of justice, has hung around.Even now, it is not gaining ground, but it has gained some attention. It deserves to gain more, as long as various carts are not placed before various horses.In addition to the somewhat increased level of attention for what shorthand is calling a "censure" of Clinton, what I find most interesting is that the topic is being discussed way up the president's chain of command.
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NEWS
By Stanley I. Kutler | October 4, 1998
THERE IS no end in sight to the relentless attacks on President Clinton, particularly from his partisan enemies who have rejected his presidency since 1993.In a recent televised "town meeting," a Provo, Utah, woman told her congressman, a conservative Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, that she cried when George Bush lost to Clinton, and that she always has seen him as unfit.She pleaded for his impeachment or resignation. She ran out of her allotted time.The young woman is legion; she belongs to that one-third of the nation regarding Clinton's presidency as illegitimate.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 10, 1998
If Larry King covered the Clinton scandal in his USA Today column:HEY, CAN somebody puhleeze explain the impeachment process to me? The only guy I know guilty of "high crimes and misdemeanors" is my last agent ...For the best corned beef in New York, try Manny's on 65th St. ...So Ken Starr's report about Clinton's shenanigans finally reached Congress. Hope the Honorables don't keep the prez twisting in the wind like a certain maitre d' at the Bombay Club did to Yours Truly Tuesday night..
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Bob Schwenk is in mid-sentence when a co-worker pops in delivering the latest update on the Starr report."Going to be 20 illustrations coming in the next couple hours," the colleague tells him. A few minutes later, the phone rings. It's a bookbinder. "Hey John," Schwenk says, "more Starr documents coming this morning, around 10: 30ish. Start organizing."In the printing world, they're getting ready for D-Day.Schwenk is in what could best be described as the war room at the Government Printing Office, preparing for what is expected to be the final dump of documents from independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on the Monica Lewinsky affair.
FEATURES
By SARAH PEKKANEN and GINA JONES | September 12, 1998
A 445-page Starr report in 36 boxes and 2 vans. A 73-page White House rebuttal. Allegations of 11 grounds for impeachment, of explicit phone sex on 12 to 15 occasions. Numbers, numbers, numbers. A few more:Number of days until Pocketbook publishes the Ken Starr report in paperback for $5.99: 3.Cost to taxpayers for each of the 18 boxes containing originals of Starr's report: $2.2 million.Cost of President Clinton's legal debt: $4.3 million.Number of Americans who have contributed to Clinton's defense: 17,000.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In the gravest threat yet to President Clinton, independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr sent to Congress yesterday his long-awaited report on the White House sex scandal, outlining evidence of impeachable offenses that could bring down the Clinton presidency.Thirty-six boxes -- containing a 25-page introduction, 280 pages of narrative, 140 pages of grounds for Starr's charges, 2,000 pages of appendixes and reams of grand jury testimony -- were delivered to the House of Representatives at 4 p.m. amid a carnival atmosphere, as tourists gawked, police officers swarmed and television cameras whirred.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The images were as mundane as they were historic: white-shirted Capitol policemen lifting cardboard cartons out of the independent counsel's Chrysler vans and loading them into their own navy Suburbans.That brief businesslike scene, carried out at the foot of the Capitol steps yesterday afternoon, marked the formal transfer of Kenneth W. Starr's case against President Clinton to Congress.With it, America's long-running national psychodrama entered a new and wholly unpredictable phase.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 22, 1998
WE HAVE been taken hostage by independent counsel Kenneth Starr's report.Not just us. The whole world, too.While the global economy sickens and real terrorists rejoice, the House Judiciary Committee homes in on the president's sex life. We could be talking months of hearings in the House of Representatives, more witnesses, an ugly public circus -- before any decision on impeachment. The nation's capital obsessing over tabloid trash.Meanwhile, the White House will remain paralyzed as Asia, Russia and the Latins slip further into economic turmoil.
NEWS
By Stanley I. Kutler | October 4, 1998
THERE IS no end in sight to the relentless attacks on President Clinton, particularly from his partisan enemies who have rejected his presidency since 1993.In a recent televised "town meeting," a Provo, Utah, woman told her congressman, a conservative Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, that she cried when George Bush lost to Clinton, and that she always has seen him as unfit.She pleaded for his impeachment or resignation. She ran out of her allotted time.The young woman is legion; she belongs to that one-third of the nation regarding Clinton's presidency as illegitimate.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Bob Schwenk is in mid-sentence when a co-worker pops in delivering the latest update on the Starr report."Going to be 20 illustrations coming in the next couple hours," the colleague tells him. A few minutes later, the phone rings. It's a bookbinder. "Hey John," Schwenk says, "more Starr documents coming this morning, around 10: 30ish. Start organizing."In the printing world, they're getting ready for D-Day.Schwenk is in what could best be described as the war room at the Government Printing Office, preparing for what is expected to be the final dump of documents from independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on the Monica Lewinsky affair.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 22, 1998
WE HAVE been taken hostage by independent counsel Kenneth Starr's report.Not just us. The whole world, too.While the global economy sickens and real terrorists rejoice, the House Judiciary Committee homes in on the president's sex life. We could be talking months of hearings in the House of Representatives, more witnesses, an ugly public circus -- before any decision on impeachment. The nation's capital obsessing over tabloid trash.Meanwhile, the White House will remain paralyzed as Asia, Russia and the Latins slip further into economic turmoil.
NEWS
September 14, 1998
PRESIDENT Clinton disgraced himself and harmed the nation by conducting an illicit affair .He appears to have committed perjury, albeit in evidence that was not material in a lawsuit that lacked merit. An ordinary citizen in similar circumstances would not be in criminal difficulty.The president, however, is not an ordinary citizen -- and his conduct merits investigation by the House Judiciary Committee and, possibly, censure.But the Starr report does not come close to the standard for impeachment in the meaning of the Framers of the Constitution -- "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors" -- no matter how vigorously and graphically Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr presents his case.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF The New York Times contributed to this article | September 13, 1998
Newspapers throughout the country sacrificed delicacy for historical completeness yesterday, deciding it was better to print the exact text of independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on President Clinton's extracurricular sex life -- graphic details and all -- than to protect readers' sensibilities."
FEATURES
By SARAH PEKKANEN and GINA JONES | September 12, 1998
A 445-page Starr report in 36 boxes and 2 vans. A 73-page White House rebuttal. Allegations of 11 grounds for impeachment, of explicit phone sex on 12 to 15 occasions. Numbers, numbers, numbers. A few more:Number of days until Pocketbook publishes the Ken Starr report in paperback for $5.99: 3.Cost to taxpayers for each of the 18 boxes containing originals of Starr's report: $2.2 million.Cost of President Clinton's legal debt: $4.3 million.Number of Americans who have contributed to Clinton's defense: 17,000.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- While a tearful President Clinton vowed to fight to keep his job, the House laid independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's voluminous case for Clinton's removal from office before the American people yesterday.Starr's report contains no major revelations that had not become public through leaks to the news media in recent weeks. But the wealth of detail in its 445 pages, filled with raw, sexually explicit language, spread shock waves across the country as millions of ordinary citizens scanned its contents over the Internet on their personal computers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress had heard salacious rumors about President Clinton's sexual escapades with Monica Lewinsky for months, but when the details landed on their desks yesterday in black and white, the reaction was profound."
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF The New York Times contributed to this article | September 13, 1998
Newspapers throughout the country sacrificed delicacy for historical completeness yesterday, deciding it was better to print the exact text of independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on President Clinton's extracurricular sex life -- graphic details and all -- than to protect readers' sensibilities."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the Clinton presidency in growing peril, the House of Representatives will release publicly this afternoon independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on the Monica Lewinsky scandal, a 445-page barrage of evidence that accuses the president of abuses worthy of impeachment.The release of a report that arrived on Capitol Hill on Wednesday will occur today despite angry complaints from Democrats that President Clinton and his lawyers have not been given a chance to review the report in advance.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the Clinton presidency in growing peril, the House of Representatives will release publicly this afternoon independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on the Monica Lewinsky scandal, a 445-page barrage of evidence that accuses the president of abuses worthy of impeachment.The release of a report that arrived on Capitol Hill on Wednesday will occur today despite angry complaints from Democrats that President Clinton and his lawyers have not been given a chance to review the report in advance.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 10, 1998
If Larry King covered the Clinton scandal in his USA Today column:HEY, CAN somebody puhleeze explain the impeachment process to me? The only guy I know guilty of "high crimes and misdemeanors" is my last agent ...For the best corned beef in New York, try Manny's on 65th St. ...So Ken Starr's report about Clinton's shenanigans finally reached Congress. Hope the Honorables don't keep the prez twisting in the wind like a certain maitre d' at the Bombay Club did to Yours Truly Tuesday night..
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