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By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 21, 1998
If events of the last few weeks have left you with any doubts that official Washington has lost its collective mind, consider this:Less than a week after its members voted to post the graphic details of President Clinton's sexual affair with Monica Lewinsky on the World Wide Web, a House subcommittee approved a bill that could make it a federal offense for commercial Web sites to make the document available to the public.The vehicle for this bizarre political attempt to have it both ways is the Child Online Protection Act - an election-year effort to restore controls on Internet content that the Supreme Court voided last year when it threw out most of the Communications Decency Act.The House bill, sponsored by Ohio Republican Michael G. Moxley, mirrors legislation passed by the Senate in July that would require commercial Web site operators (including newspapers and TV networks)
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
A Howard County Circuit judge overseeing the wiretapping case against Linda R. Tripp said yesterday that she would rule next month on what evidence, if any, state prosecutors can use against the Columbia resident.State prosecutors ended their questioning of witnesses yesterday at pretrial hearings before Judge Diane O. Leasure.Leasure must determine whether state prosecutors gathered evidence gleaned from the investigation of President Clinton by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, who promised Tripp federal immunity.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The House yesterday took its first solemn step down a road that could lead to the impeachment of President Clinton by voting overwhelmingly to release immediately to the public independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report on the president's sex scandal.The weight of the historic vote hung heavily on representatives, especially Democrats, who are deeply divided between impulses political self-preservation and their duty to uphold a Constitution that gives them the sole authority to launch impeachment proceedings.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
It was important, or so they kept telling us.It was not about sex. Or so they kept telling us.They also told us that President Clinton was gone, he was toast (Cokie, Sam, the two Georges -- Stephanopoulos and Will -- c. February 1998). They said he was here to stay forever, he was invincible. (Cokie, Sam, the two Georges, c. November 1998.) And then -- but you get the point.Now that it appears to be all but over -- this scandal has roared back to life more times than Michael Myers, the masked killer in the "Halloween" movies -- it turns out they were right about one thing -- it's not about sex. It's about trivia.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
A conservative legal foundation filed a formal complaint in Arkansas yesterday seeking to have President Clinton disbarred as an attorney based on "overwhelming evidence" that he repeatedly lied to cover up sexual misconduct.The Southeastern Legal Foundation of Atlanta -- long associated with such conservative causes as the fight to end affirmative action -- claims that evidence compiled in the Starr report released last week "reflect adversely on Mr. Clinton's honesty, trustworthiness or fitness as a lawyer."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, a moderate Republican from the Eastern Shore, yesterday became the first Maryland member of Congress to call for President Clinton's resignation, saying he believes Clinton's credibility has been destroyed.Just hours after the release of independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's report detailing the president's sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky, Gilchrest said he believes Clinton's acknowledged lies about the affair have undermined his ability to govern.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The images were as mundane as they were historic: white-shirted Capitol policemen lifting cardboard cartons out of the independent counsel's Chrysler vans and loading them into their own navy Suburbans.That brief businesslike scene, carried out at the foot of the Capitol steps yesterday afternoon, marked the formal transfer of Kenneth W. Starr's case against President Clinton to Congress.With it, America's long-running national psychodrama entered a new and wholly unpredictable phase.
NEWS
September 27, 1998
NOTHING produced by the Starr report or the subsequent deluge of evidence and testimony comes within the historic understanding of grounds for impeachment of the president.That need not stop the House of Representatives from reinterpreting the Constitution for the next century. But should the House expand the meaning to lesser and private misdeeds, it would drastically reduce the four-year presidential term to four years pending good behavior in the eyes of one's enemies.Politics would be redefined around "gotcha"-style investigations for all office-holders to come.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
Ken Starr's report has already cost taxpayers $40 million. Now your local bookstore wants to hit you up for just a little more. At least three publishing companies are hawking instant-book versions of the report -- bound in paperback and, thankfully, un-illustrated. And next month, it arrives on audio-tape. Commuters, beware.You could, of course, get the 445-page document for free inside many newspapers or on the Internet (as almost 6 million people did last weekend). But publishers say customers want a more enduring reference guide to the Lewinsky affair.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- It was all fronts of a defense in a single day.From morning to evening, President Clinton and his legal team demonstrated every method of counter-attack in the most perilous battle of his presidency.It began at a prayer breakfast, with Clinton's lip-biting show of contrition and a single dramatic tear.Then came the midday legal counter-attack, voiced by Clinton's lawyers in a 73-page rebuttal using finely calibrated logic. Later, those lawyers asserted before the cameras that independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr was simply trying to embarrass the president with his report.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Of the 18 sessions that the Senate has held in the impeachment trial of President Clinton, only one, yesterday's, was set aside for new evidence -- that is, evidence going beyond the report independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr filed with the House nearly five months ago. The presentation of that evidence raised a variety of questions. Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston supplies these answers.Does the new evidence -- portions of videotaped testimony of three witnesses -- add anything to the case for Clinton's conviction or against conviction?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 31, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The independent counsel, Kenneth W. Starr, has concluded that he has the constitutional authority to seek a grand jury indictment of President Clinton before he leaves the White House in January 2001, several associates of Starr said last week.While the Senate sat in judgment on the president, Starr and his prosecutors have actively considered whether to ask a grand jury to indict Clinton before his term expires, said Starr's associates, who spoke on condition of anonymity.These associates emphasized that Starr had not decided whether, or when, to ask the federal grand jury here to charge Clinton with perjury and obstruction of justice related to the Monica Lewinsky matter.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Just like that, this city's only sex symbol had come and gone. This week's sudden and dramatic return and departure of Monica Lewinsky created a media stir the likes of which the capital has not seen since, well, the last Lewinsky visit. Yesterday, cameras captured Lewinsky, bundled in a black coat with faux fur collar, checking out of the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel and zipping off to return home to Los Angeles. Even the tiger stripes on her Kate Spade bag could not scare off the waiting media.
NEWS
By Froma Harrop | January 26, 1999
FOR ALL their flag-waving and apple-pie eating, there is something so very un-American about the conservatives running today's Republican Party. Not many people have come out and said this, but the impression grows that they aren't playing in the same ball park as everyone else.This is not the party that brought us George Bush, Bob Dole or even Ronald Reagan. They were all identifiable products of the America we know. They were one of us.Dick Armey, Ken Starr, Tom Delay, Bob Barr. Where the heck did they come from?
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The president's lawyers and House Republican prosecutors squared off yesterday for the second question-and-answer day of the Senate impeachment trial, fielding pointed queries from senators intent on scoring partisan points.Senators will convene tomorrow to hear House and White House legal adversaries debate a Democratic motion to dismiss the trial and a Republican motion to depose witnesses.For nearly six hours yesterday, senators lobbed softball questions to the lawyers of their own party and bombshells at the opposition.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Marcia Myers and Ellen Gamerman and Marcia Myers,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- By 3: 35 p.m., only one person was left standing by the Hate and Hypocrisy sign outside the Capitol. The woman from the National Mad as Hell campaign was sitting alone on the cold grass, no mob of fellow protesters in sight. Even the baby Jesus and portable Wise Men, symbols of hope in the divisive season of politics, were packed up and hauled off the marble steps of Congress.History was supposed to be boldly in evidence this day.History, it seems, went home early.Instead of the solemnity of the moment, what Washington delivered during yesterday's impeachment debate was lots of catty commentary by outraged lawmakers, some general amazement by small groups of spectators and the occasionally grave political statement.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 12, 1998
The competition among all the cable news channels and network news divisions in covering the Kenneth W. Starr report was fierce yesterday. But it was nothing compared with the battle television journalists were collectively fighting with new technology and matters of taste in trying to tell the story.How do you report a story in which the main bank of data -- several hundred pages of the report itself -- is in cyberspace?For CNN, part of the answer was simply to show congressional correspondent Candy Crowley seated at a computer terminal, reading the report and commenting on it as she read -- an electronic version of the town crier.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 13, 1998
To a collective "ewwwww," the Starr report has bored its way into people's minds, its graphic sexual details threatening to overwhelm any of the legal or constitutional ones. With its widespread release through the media and the Internet, the report has literally laid bare what previously had been the subject of rumors, jokes or delicately worded news reports: The cigar. The stained dress. Every kiss, fondle, grope and unbuttoning, in such excruciating detail that even those who delight in flouting polite society admit to being somewhat shocked.
NEWS
By Lanny J. Davis | November 1, 1998
How might American history have been changed had Monica Lewinsky called her attorney, Frank Carter, on Friday, Jan. 16, while she was under questioning by Kenneth W. Starr's prosecutors and FBI investigators? Because of one startling and unreported fact buried in the Starr Report - that Monica Lewinsky's affidavit denying a sexual relationship with the president was not filed with the Jones court until Tuesday, Jan. 20 - we know that the consequences of Lewinsky calling Carter that day would have been huge.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Tucked into the $1.7 trillion budget agreement is a new measure meant to restrict children's access to pornography on the Internet.The measure was sponsored by Republicans working to overcome free-speech objections that the Supreme Court used in overturning a previous law.But even before Congress passes the new budget, the same groups that defeated the last effort are vowing to sue once again.The old act tried to regulate access by children to "indecent" or "patently offensive" pornographic material.
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