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SPORTS
December 25, 2009
It sometimes seems as if Derek Glasser has been the point guard at Arizona State forever. "Before every game now, the refs come up to me and say, 'You still here?' " Glasser said with a grin. "And I'm like, 'Yeah, I'm still here.' " The Sun Devils are glad for that. The 6-foot-1 senior from Marina del Rey, Calif, is a throwback to a forgotten time in college hoops, when players came to campus as raw freshmen and grew into trusted, tested seniors. Little more than an emergency fill-in when he arrived in the summer of 2006, Glasser has become the school's assists leader, its most accurate free throw shooter and a cornerstone of a revived program (10-3)
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Of the 287 goals Paul Rabil has scored as a midfielder for Johns Hopkins and the Boston Cannons, 62 have been assisted. Not counted there is a big assist from a longtime rival of Rabil's: Dave Cottle. After deciding to pursue lacrosse, Rabil transferred to DeMatha High in Hyattsville following his freshman year at Watkins Mill in Gaithersburg. He then attended a lacrosse camp where Cottle was coaching. Rabil recalled how Cottle challenged the roughly 200 campers to take 100 shots per day. "Everyone's like, 'Psh, no way,'" Rabil said as the keynote speaker of The Baltimore Sun High School Athletes of the Year luncheon on May 28. "And he's like, 'It's got to be a real 100 shots, counting holidays, counting blizzards.
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FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | January 8, 1995
Brad Pitt has been the flavor of the month for so long he should start wearing a Baskin-Robbins uniform.He has been one of Hollywood's hottest actors-on-the-verge-of-stardom since his celebrated, albeit brief, breakthrough role three years ago in "Thelma & Louise." There were the inevitable "next James Dean" whispers."A River Runs Through It" was supposed to be the star-making vehicle that drove him to his destiny. His fans said he was terrific in the role, and the film was a sleeper hit but not enough of a hit to shine Mr. Pitt's star.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Amy Schumer can tell a story. Knowing how to craft a short narrative and make it pay off with a laugh has, after all, helped make her one of the hottest comedians on TV and the concert circuit these days. So, let the star of Comedy Central's “Inside Amy Schumer” explain how it came to be that she finished her work for a bachelor's degree in theater at Towson University in 2003 but didn't receive her diploma until 2007 - in the lobby of Baltimore's Lyric Opera House. “I say I graduated in 2003 from Towson, but that's not actually true,” the 31-year-old New-York-born performer says in a recent interview.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | February 17, 2007
For Shay Doron, the fantasy became a hardened quest when she reached the cusp of high school. She was already a run-and-gun scorer for five youth and school teams, and it wasn't hard to imagine that with normal progress, she'd become one of the best female basketball players in Israel. She might even earn a scholarship to play college ball in the United States. Duke women@Maryland Tomorrow, 6 p.m., Comcast SportsNet
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
It's said that the first step toward fixing a problem is recognizing you have one. So when the producers of the TV show "Making Over America" needed a subject for an August episode, they stumbled upon gold in LaShunda Rodgers, an Army staff sergeant and self-described "crazy person" based at Fort Meade. The cheerful Rodgers, who was getting ready to turn 30 this year, had a feeling her style of dress was less than appropriate for her status as a maturing single mother. The show "sent an e-mail to every female stationed at Fort Meade, asking us to describe our style problems, what was in our closets and other things," says Rodgers, an Iraq war veteran who teaches multimedia illustration on the base.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1997
It's a typical Tuesday at the Montgomery Plaza Giant supermarket -- except, of course, for the 27-foot-long hot dog parked outside.Inside the Route 40 Giant, things are a little less than ordinary, too. At least in the bakery section, where a very perky Patty "Pickle" Kan is cheerfully attempting to teach a handful of toddlers the words to a familiar song:"Oh, I wish I were an Oscar Mayer wie-ner. That is what I'd truly like to be-ee-ee. 'Cause if I were an Oscar Mayer wie-ner, everyone would be in love with me."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 22, 1996
"Girl 6" is, both sadly and spectacularly, what we have come to expect from Spike Lee: It's a brilliant mess.Insanely ambitious and courting controversy like a man in love, the film represents Lee's return to the terrain that originally established him as a talent to watch. That is, as in "She's Gotta Have It," he's gone back to female sexuality, trying to understand exactly what it is she's gotta have and why she's gotta have it.The "she" in question is Theresa Randle, whose reach for stardom this film represents and whose arrival there it signals.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
It's said that the first step toward fixing a problem is recognizing you have one. So when the producers of the TV show "Making Over America" needed a subject for an August episode, they stumbled upon gold in LaShunda Rodgers, an Army staff sergeant and self-described "crazy person" based at Fort Meade. The cheerful Rodgers, who was getting ready to turn 30 this year, had a feeling her style of dress was less than appropriate for her status as a maturing single mother. The show "sent an e-mail to every female stationed at Fort Meade, asking us to describe our style problems, what was in our closets and other things," says Rodgers, an Iraq war veteran who teaches multimedia illustration on the base.
NEWS
March 9, 2004
Frances Dee, 94, who co-starred in films with Maurice Chevalier, Gary Cooper, Ronald Colman and her husband, Joel McCrea, died Saturday in Norwalk, Conn., her son said. Miss Dee achieved stardom in 1930 opposite Mr. Chevalier in one of the first talkie musicals, The Playboy of Paris. She retired after making Gypsy Colt in 1954. Her husband died in 1990.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
For three weeks in June 2009, Tom Schreiber was in a bit of limbo about his status as Princeton's most prized men's lacrosse recruit. Bill Tierney had just resigned as coach after 22 seasons, and Schreiber, a midfielder, was growing worried. Then the university named Chris Bates from Drexel as Tierney's successor. Bates dispelled Schreiber's anxiety quickly, driving to the family home in East Meadow, N.Y., the day after he was hired to meet with Doug and Liz Schreiber, and then spend a few hours with their son. "I kind of had a unique recruiting experience," Tom Schreiber recalled.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
On the first day of the rest of his life,  Michael Phelps   slept in. Really in. "I just woke up," he told reporters at a 1 p.m. news conference Sunday, the day after he swam his last race ever to complete a 22-medal run over four Olympics. After spending much of his life seeing almost nothing but "the black line at the bottom of the pool," Phelps seemed ready to make up for lost time. He's been here for about two weeks, for example, but just now had seen Big Ben and the Parliament as he was driven to the event, organized by one of his sponsors, Visa.
SPORTS
By David Wharton, Tribune Newspapers | December 14, 2011
The moment when Robert Griffin III stepped to the podium Saturday night to receive the Heisman Trophy, greeted by a contingent of past winners, the Baylor quarterback automatically became eligible for membership in another sort of club. Not that he wants to join it. No player does. It is the society of Heisman flops. Scroll down the long and prominent list — Pat Sullivan, Jason White, Eric Crouch, et al. — of men who stood on college football's highest pedestal only to crash and burn as pros.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
Each week, when Ravens cornerback Lardarius Webb shows up to do his radio show at the Al Packer Ford dealership in White Marsh, fans eagerly await, the majority of them hungry to get his autograph. During commercial breaks, they stand in line until it's their turn to shuffle forward and enthusiastically thrust a football, a picture, a jersey or a hat into his hands. The ritual of signing autographs still feels a tad surreal to Webb, even though this is his third year in the NFL. Even if you could get him to concede he has quietly become one of the best young cornerbacks in the NFL -- a statement that makes him smile, but one he's reluctant to make on his own -- there is a part of him that still feels like the skinny, shy kid who grew up in tiny Opelika, Ala., dreaming of big things.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | August 24, 2011
Summer is a good time to catch professional dancers with Howard County roots on hometown visits between gigs. Some are now dancing professionally in other parts of the country, and others are gearing up for big fall tours. Ashley Blair Fitzgerald is one of the latter. A few weeks back she taught a master dance class at Lori Pryor's Dance Foundations on Route 108, in Columbia. This leggy Ann Reinking-look-alike first caught our attention as a teen performing in classical ballet variations with her sister Amanda at Ballet Royale.
SPORTS
December 25, 2009
It sometimes seems as if Derek Glasser has been the point guard at Arizona State forever. "Before every game now, the refs come up to me and say, 'You still here?' " Glasser said with a grin. "And I'm like, 'Yeah, I'm still here.' " The Sun Devils are glad for that. The 6-foot-1 senior from Marina del Rey, Calif, is a throwback to a forgotten time in college hoops, when players came to campus as raw freshmen and grew into trusted, tested seniors. Little more than an emergency fill-in when he arrived in the summer of 2006, Glasser has become the school's assists leader, its most accurate free throw shooter and a cornerstone of a revived program (10-3)
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | October 31, 2008
First, Chris Jericho wanted to "save us," and then his mantra became "save me." Now, he is playing a role in helping 11 female singers who are seeking redemption. Jericho is the host of Fuse TV's Redemption Song, a reality competition show in which down-on-their-luck singers with troubled pasts vie for their last chance at musical stardom. The show debuted Wednesday night. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ringposts)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2006
Maryland's own Good Charlotte is coming back home with a performance at Sonar on Sunday. The Waldorf natives began their rise to stardom by playing local clubs and venues. Yet songs such as "Hold On" and "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" would later catapult the foursome to the top of music charts. Good Charlotte will perform at 7 p.m. The club is at 407 E. Saratoga St. Call 410-327-8333 or go to ticketmaster.com for tickets.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
It's said that the first step toward fixing a problem is recognizing you have one. So when the producers of the TV show "Making Over America" needed a subject for an August episode, they stumbled upon gold in LaShunda Rodgers, an Army staff sergeant and self-described "crazy person" based at Fort Meade. The cheerful Rodgers, who was getting ready to turn 30 this year, had a feeling her style of dress was less than appropriate for her status as a maturing single mother. The show "sent an e-mail to every female stationed at Fort Meade, asking us to describe our style problems, what was in our closets and other things," says Rodgers, an Iraq war veteran who teaches multimedia illustration on the base.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
It's said that the first step toward fixing a problem is recognizing you have one. So when the producers of the TV show "Making Over America" needed a subject for an August episode, they stumbled upon gold in LaShunda Rodgers, an Army staff sergeant and self-described "crazy person" based at Fort Meade. The cheerful Rodgers, who was getting ready to turn 30 this year, had a feeling her style of dress was less than appropriate for her status as a maturing single mother. The show "sent an e-mail to every female stationed at Fort Meade, asking us to describe our style problems, what was in our closets and other things," says Rodgers, an Iraq war veteran who teaches multimedia illustration on the base.
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