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By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 17, 2009
Anthony Daniels admits that being a pop icon can get old. But the man who played the gleaming gold robot C-3PO in all six "Star Wars" movies is by no means complaining. When hundreds of thousands of people have been so touched by your work, it's hard to stay too down. "Yes, there were times when it felt old, and almost - I'm going to use the word 'embarrassing,' without meaning to be unkind," says the 63-year-old British actor, who will be at 1st Mariner Arena Wednesday night to serve as narrator for "Star Wars in Concert," a multimedia presentation of John Williams' Oscar-winning scores, complete with orchestra, a huge movie screen and all manner of light effects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
This week 37 years ago, three members of the band Lynyrd Skynyrd died in a plane crash in Mississippi, Reggie Jackson hit three consecutive home runs in a game, tying Babe Ruth's record and the following songs were the most popular in the United States, according to Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "Swayin' to the Music (Slow Dancin')," Johnny Rivers This simple song about, you know, slow dancing in the middle of the night, was Rivers' last big hit in America. The song's composer, Jack Tempchin, penned the similarly mellow Eagles hit "Peaceful Easy Feeling.
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FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 5, 2006
Come September, the Force returns to the original Star Wars' biggest fans. Between Sept. 12 and Dec. 31, those who fell in love with Han Solo and Princess Leia in theaters will be able to purchase the original versions of Episodes IV (1977, A New Hope), V (1980, The Empire Strikes Back) and VI (1983, Return of the Jedi), for the first time on DVD, packaged with the digitally enhanced and expanded versions released theatrically in 1997. Each title will go out as a two-disc set with a suggested retail price of $29.95.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
George Takei, speaking by phone from his California home, cannot resist describing the un-wintry view from his window. "There's a flawless blue sky, golden sunshine and a green garden outside," the Los Angeles-born Takei says in his burnished baritone, with just a hint of gloating. "But I am looking forward to being back in Baltimore. I love the bracing air of the Inner Harbor. " The man who first earned fame portraying Lt. Sulu in the 1960s TV series "Star Trek" will serve as narrator/host of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's "Sci-Fi Spectacular" this week.
NEWS
By GILBERT LEWTHWAITE | May 14, 1995
If there was one weapon system that caught the popular imagination in recent years it was "star wars," the sci-fi plan President Ronald Reagan launched in 1983 to put a protective anti-missile umbrella over this nation.It was to involve a network of satellites, sensors, lasers and interceptors in a triumph of 21st-century technology over age-old fears of attack. A decade and $36 billion later, it was abandoned as too much, too late.The end of the Cold War meant the end of "star wars."The reverse has also been argued: "Star wars" meant the end of the Cold War. It enabled the United States to play a card to which the Soviet Union had no answer, either financially or technologically.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun Reporter | November 29, 2006
Lucasfilm Ltd., the production company founded by Star Wars creator George Lucas and owner of the Star Wars trademark, is suing a Maryland business that sells Star Wars light sabers through the Internet. Lucasfilm filed a patent-infringement lawsuit yesterday against William L. Osburn and an Abingdon company that he owns, High-Tech Magic, in U.S. District Court in the Northern District of California. High-Tech Magic is diluting the Star Wars trademark and making a profit by "confusing fans," Howard Roffman, president of Lucas Licensing, said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
Things had been coming to a head at her Kinko's Copies job for some time. Diana Bradley figured the 10 a.m. screening of "Star Wars" at the Senator Theatre yesterday was as good a reason as any to quit. So she did.There was Bradley in the second row, reading a book in the dim, pre-show light while waiting for the newly released special edition of the 1977 film to begin.Bradley was among 400 or so "Star Wars" acolytes at the Senator yesterday morning for the film's first showing, most of them young adults who essentially grew up with Han Solo, Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia and their licensed character merchandise.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 16, 1999
TOM KIEFABER walked across York Road about 2: 30 p.m. and headed into the doors of the Senator Theater. Wearing black jeans and a white shirt with a Lucasfilm Ltd. logo in blue letters on the upper left, he stopped briefly to hand a reporter a copy of a letter he had written to his "lawn-chair brigade."He was referring to the folks who sat, ever patiently, in chairs or on the ground in a line that went up York Road, wound its way around Belvedere Avenue and then snaked up a curving side street known as Croydon Road.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 19, 1990
WASHINGTON -- In a stiff challenge to the Pentagon's goal of building a "star wars" missile shield, the House yesterday slashed President Bush's $4.7 billion request for the program by more than half, to $2.3 billion.The 225-189 vote sent a clear signal to the Pentagon that support for the Strategic Defense Initiative, waning since President Ronald Reagan left office nearly two years ago, has begun to plummet.Representative Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., said the United States needed the "star wars" shield to avoid being "held hostage by some tinhorn dictator" armed with missiles.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | May 2, 1999
IT'S COMING! PUT YOUR ear to the page and listen ... Bom-bom! Bom bom bom bom-bom! Bom bom bom bom bom! Bom bom bom bom ... That's right: It's the theme from "Star Wars," the movie series that gave the world a whole new lexicon, including such phrases as "the Force," "Death Star," "light saber," "lexicon" and "licensed merchandise.""Star Wars" has become an important and cherished part of our shared cultural heritage, like Starbucks and Pez. And soon another chapter will be added to the "Star Wars" legend with the release of the long-awaited new installment in the series, "Episode I: The Empire Gets a Building Permit."
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
It took me a little longer to get back to this than I expected (if it makes you feel better, imagine my hyperdrive motivator was damaged ), but after so many of you spent time this week reading about the  Star Wars-themed redesign of NFL team helmets , I had to share my recent e-mail exchange with John Raya, the project's mastermind. Raya, an artist in Mexico, said he had the idea for his project after studying fans of the Oakland Raiders. "I saw fans of the Raiders, those who attend every game, and saw that among them there is a character dressed as Darth Vader ," Raya wrote this week.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
As the 2000 Ravens embraced their defensive identity and a run-first offensive strategy, head coach Brian Billick -- coordinator of wide-open passing offenses in Minnesota -- joked that he'd been " pulled over to the dark side . " Almost 14 years later, an artist in Mexico has designed a football helmet to better depict Billick and the Ravens' fall. In a project posted on behance.net , artist John Raya shows off his Star Wars-themed redesigns of helmets for the teams in the AFC and NFC . Raya substituted each NFL city with a planet from the Star Wars universe and each NFL mascot with a character or creature from the the sci-fi staple.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 21, 2013
The force is strong with these ones. The Baltimore Zoo has announced Friday the winners of a contest to name its two lion cubs. With more than 20,000 votes, the cubs will now be known as Luke and Leia -- after the heroes of the first three "Star Wars" movies -- beating out suggestions from "The Simpsons" and Shakespeare. The 10-week-old cubs, who lost their mother when she died from labor complications, are reported to be in good health. The zoo's website reports: "They are both healthy and enjoy playing with one another.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| December 10, 2013
Here's a fun project for the kids: The two cute lion cubs at The Maryland Zoo are in need of names, and the zoo wants the public's input. The 9-week-old cubs, who lost their mother when she died from labor complications, are reported to be in good health. The zoo reports that: "The male cub has a lighter coat of fur and is more laid back, a pretty relaxed cub who likes to stay near his sister. The sister is covered in dark spots. She has a fiery personality, is always the first one to check out new things and she is the instigator in all of their lion-cub tussles.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Christina Murphy wanted her Halloween party to be epic. Rooms were given ghoulish themes. Everything was cobwebbed. Each light bulb was switched out into autumn colors. She even hired a professional makeup artist for herself and guests. Murphy enlisted the help of Lutherville-based Lexi Martinez to help transform her into "Star Wars" character Oola, Jabba the Hutt's green-hued dancer. She said her guests were blown away. "It looked amazing," said Murphy, a 28-year-old bartender.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013
As a kid, Dean Storm would create stop motion animation featuring G.I. Joe characters and make animated action flip movies on bus pass booklets. "I wanted to be like Dawson on 'Dawson's Creek,'" he said. Storm, who lived in Canton for seven years prior to moving to Anneslie, was able to follow his dreams when he was able to afford video equipment and editing software. Since 2007, he has written and directed a dozen short films. Now, the 39-year-old digital content manager of the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development has imparted his love of filmmaking to others with 29 Days Later.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 14, 1997
The scene: York Road, in front of the Senator Theatre, Tuesday night, a little after 10. Another sold-out screening of "Star Wars." The crowd empties onto the light-bright sidewalk and moves down the road to the parking lot behind Staples. A police cruiser, with two young officers in the front, crawls along with the human traffic. One of the cops picks up a microphone and, through the cruiser's loudspeaker, does his best Darth Vader: "Luke, I am your father. I am your father, Luke."Big laughs in the night, according to Susan Caro and Steve Quinn, who were there.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Hal D. Wood, a retired engineer and Navy veteran, died June 12 of heart failure at Englewood Health Care and Rehabilitation Center in Englewood, Fla. The former longtime Wiltondale resident was 85. The son of orange grove farmers, Hal Deaver Wood was born and raised in Evinston, Fla., where he graduated from high school. Mr. Wood attended the University of Florida, where he played football. But he wanted to become a naval aviator, and he left the university to attend the Naval Preparatory School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
John Williams has won just about everything there is to win in the music industry, including a slew of Grammys, Golden Globes, Emmys and no less than five Academy Awards - his record of 48 Oscar nominations is second only to Walt Disney. If the 81-year-old composer, whose career encompasses the campy mid-'60s vintage TV series "Lost in Space" and last year's sobering, soaring movie "Lincoln," wanted to rest on his comfy stack of laurels, no one would blame him. But Williams remains as busy as ever with film projects, commissions for concert works and conducting gigs.
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