Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStar Trek
IN THE NEWS

Star Trek

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
George Takei, speaking by phone from his California home, cannot resist describing the un-wintry view from his window. "There's a flawless blue sky, golden sunshine and a green garden outside," the Los Angeles-born Takei says in his burnished baritone, with just a hint of gloating. "But I am looking forward to being back in Baltimore. I love the bracing air of the Inner Harbor. " The man who first earned fame portraying Lt. Sulu in the 1960s TV series "Star Trek" will serve as narrator/host of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's "Sci-Fi Spectacular" this week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
After working all day in their jobs with the federal government, Ann and John White don't like to come home and watch reality TV. They prefer to get immersed in something they consider more thought-provoking: science fiction. Over the weekend, the Laurel couple went to Timonium to meet with others who feel the same way at Farpoint 2011, a "fan-based" sci-fi convention at the Crowne Plaza Baltimore North hotel. "Fifty years from now, they probably aren't going to have a 'Survivor' convention or a 'Jersey Shore' convention," said Ann White.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
The nation's space exploration program had already captivated 12-year-old Howard Weinstein's imagination when the episodes of the original "Star Trek" began airing in 1966. "The show was the coolest thing happening on TV, outside of space launches," the Elkridge author said, recalling how school days were interrupted so that bulky TVs could be wheeled into classrooms for students across the nation to watch live blastoffs. The science fiction series, which follows the voyages of the starship USS Enterprise, shared an optimistic outlook with the U.S. space program that attracted the now 59-year-old author of 65 "Star Trek" comic books and seven "Star Trek" novels.
FEATURES
September 5, 1991
The Senator theater is offering fans of the "Star Trek" movies a chance to "sit long and prosper" with a marathon screening Saturday of all five movies in the series.The films will be shown in order, beginning at noon but including a 6:30 to 8 p.m. dinner break. The first three, "Star Trek -- The Motion Picture" (1979), "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan" (1982) and "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock" (1984), will be shown from noon to 6:30. The final films, "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" (1986)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
If getting arrested and spending some time in a Klingon jail is your idea of a good time, then don't miss this weekend's Shore Leave 33. It could be the place your dream comes true. "People love it," says Michael Schilling, a spokesman for the three-day science-fiction and fantasy convention opening Friday in Hunt Valley. "People get arrested by Klingons in full costume, they throw you in jail. I think they do things like sing the 'Barney' song to torture you. " Sounds painful.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
The nation's space exploration program had already captivated 12-year-old Howard Weinstein's imagination when the episodes of the original "Star Trek" began airing in 1966. "The show was the coolest thing happening on TV, outside of space launches," the Elkridge author said, recalling how school days were interrupted so that bulky TVs could be wheeled into classrooms for students across the nation to watch live blastoffs. The science fiction series, which follows the voyages of the starship USS Enterprise, shared an optimistic outlook with the U.S. space program that attracted the now 59-year-old author of 65 "Star Trek" comic books and seven "Star Trek" novels.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- A 25-year-old Los Angeles resident, described by police as a fan of the popular television "Star Trek" series, has been arrested for possession of costumes allegedly stolen from Paramount Studios in Hollywood.The arrest was the first related to a series "Star Trek" thefts over the past two years, Los Angeles police said.Officers said they found Kevin Buehler with $50,000 worth of costumes and hardware from the original television series and its descendants, "Star Trek: The Next Generation," and various "Star Trek" movies.
NEWS
May 25, 1994
Devoted viewers of television's "Star Trek" series have become accustomed to such sci-fi marvels as "warp drive," "tachyon scans" and -- wonder of wonders! -- the "holodeck," where weary starship crews repair for R&R in virtual-reality vacation hideaways. But this week, after seven seasons on the air, Paramount finally pulled the plug on "Star Trek: The Next Generation," the hugely popular spin-off of the original 1960s show.The first "Star Trek" was yanked after only a couple of seasons, yet has triumphed in re-runs for some 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
George Takei, speaking by phone from his California home, cannot resist describing the un-wintry view from his window. "There's a flawless blue sky, golden sunshine and a green garden outside," the Los Angeles-born Takei says in his burnished baritone, with just a hint of gloating. "But I am looking forward to being back in Baltimore. I love the bracing air of the Inner Harbor. " The man who first earned fame portraying Lt. Sulu in the 1960s TV series "Star Trek" will serve as narrator/host of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's "Sci-Fi Spectacular" this week.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
For years, William Shatner wanted no part of the convention scene, had no desire to appear in front of the Trekkies, fanboys and obsessive sci-fi geeks who all craved a piece of Capt. James Tiberius Kirk. "That's very true," says Shatner, whose stance was perfectly captured in a 1986 "Saturday Night Live" skit, in which he urged a convention of costumed "Star Trek" fans to "get a life, will you, people!" But that was then. Today, Shatner is at peace with Captain Kirk - and, more important, with Captain Kirk's fans.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Captain Kirk himself will beam into Baltimore this summer to appear at the Shore Leave science fiction convention in Hunt Valley, according to the event's website. The 35th annual convention will offer writing workshops, panel discussions, role playing games and a chance to meet authors and stars. Shatner, who has been known to turn down much bigger gigs, is a major score -- particularly for a convention founded by folks brought together by a love of "Star Trek. " He will appear Aug. 3. If fans want his autograph, or to take a picture with Shatner, they'll have to open their wallets.
NEWS
August 25, 2011
Once again the Republicans are telling stories meant to frighten little children. Adults know better. Del. Ron George from Anne Arundel County states that we need to worry about Sharia law. And how does he think this threat will materialize? Who in the U.S. favors such laws? What politician has even hinted that they favor such a change? Only eight Muslim majority countries out of 40 (Mr. George cites only three) have such a legal structure. And we are hardly a Muslim country. Our Muslim population is sixth-tenths of one percent of the total.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
If getting arrested and spending some time in a Klingon jail is your idea of a good time, then don't miss this weekend's Shore Leave 33. It could be the place your dream comes true. "People love it," says Michael Schilling, a spokesman for the three-day science-fiction and fantasy convention opening Friday in Hunt Valley. "People get arrested by Klingons in full costume, they throw you in jail. I think they do things like sing the 'Barney' song to torture you. " Sounds painful.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
After working all day in their jobs with the federal government, Ann and John White don't like to come home and watch reality TV. They prefer to get immersed in something they consider more thought-provoking: science fiction. Over the weekend, the Laurel couple went to Timonium to meet with others who feel the same way at Farpoint 2011, a "fan-based" sci-fi convention at the Crowne Plaza Baltimore North hotel. "Fifty years from now, they probably aren't going to have a 'Survivor' convention or a 'Jersey Shore' convention," said Ann White.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | January 16, 1995
Make no mistake. Kate Mulgrew is the captain, a worthy successor in the line of steel-jawed space explorers for the United Federation of Planets. In tonight's premiere of "Star Trek: Voyager," she takes firm and fascinating command of the launch vehicle for the new United Paramount Network.In a movie-length debut episode (8 p.m. on WNUV, Channel 54, and WDCA, Channel 20), Ms. Mulgrew barks orders, strides through exploding bulkheads and frets about her pregnant dog back home. As Capt. Kathryn Janeway, she easily dominates every scene she has and should make Paramount thankful that Genevieve Bujold, originally signed for the role, walked off the set after a few days.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 15, 1994
Diane Carey may be "stuck in the 1800s," as she readily concedes, but through the magic of science fiction she can project her favorite period forward a few centuries.That explains how the Pride of Baltimore II, Baltimore's goodwill sailing ambassador designed after an 1800s ship, sails in spirit through "The Great Starship Race," Ms. Carey's latest novel for the ongoing series of "Star Trek" books.Released in November (Pocket Books, $5.50), the novel places Capt. James T. Kirk and crew aboard the starship Enterprise in the middle of a 23rd-century space race celebrating contact with a new civilization.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | sam.sessa@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 2, 2010
In 2002, Christy Wnuk-Fink walked into the Last Chance Saloon in Columbia and saw a flier for Final Score Trivia Night. Intrigued, Wnuk-Fink assembled a group of friends and family, and gave it a shot. It didn't go so well at first. "We showed up and got our teeth completely kicked in by all the other teams," she recalled. Still, Wnuk-Fink kept coming back. Her team, Abacus Nil (it means "you can count on us to score nothing," she said), played for about 4 1/2 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
In the course of 25 years, actor Jeffrey Combs has gone from reviving corpses to serving as a Ferengi agent to embodying possibly the greatest American literary figure of the 19th century. His fans must get whiplash just trying to keep up with this guy. "I'm just a squirrel trying to keep the engine going here," says Combs, who will be bringing his one-man play "Nevermore" to this weekend's 201st birthday celebration for Edgar Allan Poe. "Running on the wheel, that's all you're doing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.