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Star Spangled Banner

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Lester S. Levy bagged his first-edition copy of "The Star-Spangled Banner" in 1940 for $170, appreciably less than an anonymous buyer plunked down — $506,5000 — 70 years later on Dec. 3 at Christie's Auction House in New York, for the rare two-page piece of sheet music, one of 11 copies extant. My colleague, Chris Kaltenbach, writing in The Baltimore Sun, reported that the sale doubled its pre-auction estimates and set a world record for a single piece of sheet music.
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NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | September 11, 2014
Two-hundred years ago, a Maryland-born lawyer watched as British forces bombarded Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. At dawn, against all odds, the massive star-spangled banner flew over the fort, signaling America's triumphant defense of Baltimore. As the flag waved, Francis Scott Key penned the words that would become our National Anthem. This week, as we celebrate the bicentennial anniversary of the defense of Fort McHenry and our National Anthem, we celebrate more than Maryland's special sacrifice in the defense of American independence that September dawn.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 9, 2013
Two businesses in Bel Air recently teamed up to get a special edition Old Glory flying again. Bishop & Adkins P.A., a CPA firm at 612 Rock Spring Road, says it recently acquired a replica of the original garrison flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore on Sept. 12, 1814. The replica had flown over Fort McHenry and was in need of repair, the firm noted in a news release. The flag was taken to Kroh's Cleaners on Pennsylvania Avenue, which repaired and cleaned it. Bishop & Adkins was able to display the repaired flag for the July 4th celebrations in Bel Air and elsewhere in Harford County.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Oh, say can you see a new slogan for Baltimore City? Councilman James B. Kraft can. He petitioned his fellow City Council members to pass a resolution Monday declaring a new official motto for the city: "Baltimore - Birthplace of The Star-Spangled Banner. " The new declaration coincides with the bicentennial commemoration of the War of 1812, which begins Wednesday. "Every day someone around this globe is singing 'The Star-Spangled Banner,'" Kraft said, "and that 'Star-Spangled Banner' started here, right in the harbor, right down the street.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Barb and Greg Damon traveled to Maryland from Oregon to run a marathon and left with an unusual souvenir. The Damons were among the first people who went to Fort McHenry Monday to purchase commemorative coins created by the United States Mint to mark the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Barb Damon said she and her husband ran in the B&A Trail Marathon over the weekend as part of a quest to complete a marathon in every state. She said they also collect coins and couldn't pass up the chance to purchase a coin on the first day it was issued.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
Oh Say Can You See …half a million dollars? A rare first edition of the sheet music for "The Star-Spangled Banner" sold for $506,500 at Christie's Auction House in New York Friday, doubling pre-auction estimates of its value and setting a world auction record for sheet music. The two-page piece of sheet music, published by a Baltimore printer in 1814, was sold to a private U.S. collector who wishes to remain anonymous, Christie's spokeswoman Sung-Hee Park said. It is one of only 11 copies of that first printing known to exist, and apparently remains the only one in private hands.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Decades of careful restoration and study have revealed a lot about the flag that flew over Fort McHenry after its defenders fought off a naval attack during the War of 1812: the swatches taken as mementos of the pivotal battle, the areas worn by time, perhaps even sections damaged by British mortar fire. But a gaping hole at the center of the original Star-Spangled Banner presents a question that no one has been able to answer: What happened to the missing star? "It's a major mystery," said Lonn Taylor, a retired historian who helped the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History reconstruct the story of the flag in the century after it left the fort and before it entered the museum's collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
A key document in the transition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" from popular song to national anthem is coming home to Fort McHenry. A draft of the song's arrangement, drawn up in the early 20th century by a committee that included composer and bandleader John Philip Sousa, has been donated to the national monument and historic shrine by the woman whose father obtained it from his music teacher. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was adopted as the national anthem by an act of Congress in 1931.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
On most days, Tony Wheeler of Arnold is a guide for a company that offers historic tours in Maryland. But on Sunday, Wheeler became part of history himself. Wheeler, wearing a top hat and early 19th-century attire, joined hundreds of volunteers at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore to help sew a reproduction of the original Star-Spangled Banner. "This is the first time I sewed in my life," said Wheeler, 78, after adding his stitch to the hem of the flag. The project is part of events marking the bicentennial of the War of 1812.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 4, 2001
The family feel to the second annual "Baltimore Bash" went beyond the expected at the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House fund-raiser. The party had been postponed from Sept. 15 because of the events of Sept. 11. So its themes of family and country seemed intensified. But so was the fun. Inside the Baltimore Brewing Co. building next door to the Flag House, kids created artistic masterpieces at a crafts table. They also pasted red and blue stickers on a large white posterboard to create a replica of the flag, while their parents scanned the silent auction table nearby.
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley | September 8, 2014
A rare and previously unknown letter by George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, is going under the auction gavel this week at an auction house in Chesapeake City, Cecil County. The May 3, 1811 letter, which has an estimated value of $20,000 to $30,000, throws new light about the commissioning of the giant flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. It will be auctioned off Tuesday or Wednesday at Alexander Historical Auctions on behalf of a private collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2014
If you glanced at the sky lately, you will understand why the Baltimore Symphony made this call. Here's the statement: Due to this evening's weather forecast, the July 3 performance of Star-Spangled Spectacular at Oregon Ridge has been canceled. All tickets and parking passes for tonight's performance will be honored tomorrow evening, Friday, July 4. Please contact the BSO Ticket Office at 410.783.8000 for more information. Please note that both winners of the “O, Say Can You Sing?
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Decades of careful restoration and study have revealed a lot about the flag that flew over Fort McHenry after its defenders fought off a naval attack during the War of 1812: the swatches taken as mementos of the pivotal battle, the areas worn by time, perhaps even sections damaged by British mortar fire. But a gaping hole at the center of the original Star-Spangled Banner presents a question that no one has been able to answer: What happened to the missing star? "It's a major mystery," said Lonn Taylor, a retired historian who helped the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History reconstruct the story of the flag in the century after it left the fort and before it entered the museum's collection.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Two years ago, Baltimore rolled out the red carpet, and then some, for the War of 1812 bicentennial celebration, welcoming tens of thousands of visitors to commemorate what some have called the second war for American independence. This year, they'll be doing it again. And just about all of Maryland will be helping out. On Thursday at Prince George's County's Bladensburg Waterfront Park, Gov. Martin O'Malley joined other state, federal and local officials in cutting the ribbon to officially open the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail, a 560-mile land and water route connecting War of 1812-related sites in Maryland, Washington and Virginia.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
As Defenders' Day approaches here in Baltimore, we will be commemorating the two-hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore and Francis Scott Key's composition of "The Defence of Fort McHenry. "  I expect that the ink was scarcely dry on the poem when people were singing it, to the tune of "To Anacreon in Heaven," a British  drinking song. It caught on, of course, though "The Star-Spangled Banner" did not become the official national anthem until 1931. In 1879, Dudley Buck, an American  organist and composer, used the tune in a composition for organ later orchestrated as the "Festival Overture on the American National Air," also known as the "Festival Overture on the 'Star-Spangled Banner.'" Surely someone in Baltimore will find a way to program this work during the bicentennial season.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The Pride of Baltimore II took its first sail of the season Monday, as it traveled to Annapolis carrying a replica of the flag that inspired the national anthem. The flag has been displayed publicly only once since it was created by Maryland Historical Society volunteers last summer to commemorate the bicentennial of the War of 1812. On Tuesday it will play an integral role in the state's observation of Maryland Day, which celebrates the arrival of European colonists in Maryland in 1634.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
It's the typo that gives it away. The two 13-by-9.5-inch pieces of paper that will go up for auction at Christie's on Friday spell out in big, bold, black letters, "The Star Spangled Banner. " Underneath this heading is written, much smaller, these words of explanation: "A Pariotic Song. " Thomas Carr, a 19th century music publisher who operated a store at 36 Baltimore St., intended to print "A Patriotic Song. " But he was rushing to capitalize on the popularity of the little ditty that Francis Scott Key penned while watching the bombing of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812, and lacked the modern-day luxury of spell-check.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and By Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Staff | June 10, 2001
"The Flag, The Poet & The Song: The Story of the Star-Spangled Banner," by Irvin Molotsky. Dutton. 240 pages. $22.95. The story surrounding the writing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" is certainly a familiar one to Marylanders, since it happened in their own backyard. Or is it? Irvin Molotsky, a New York Times reporter, has unmasked and exposed much of the historical nonsense that has surrounded the creation of the national anthem since its writing in 1814. And in doing so, he has written a thoroughly fascinating and meticulously researched account which examines the personalities and historical background behind "The Star-Spangled Banner."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
A year of events celebrating the 200 t h anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner kicked off Thursday with the unveiling of a commemorative stamp. The newest installment of the popular "forever" stamps - so named because they continue to be valid even if the cost of postage rises - features Old Glory in front of scarlet and white fireworks representing the "rockets' red glare" described in the national anthem. The stamp was introduced at a ceremony in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, according to a Maryland Historical Society news release.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
At the start of the very first Ravens game, back in Memorial Stadium, a recent graduate of Morgan State University stepped forward to sing the national anthem, burnishing the words with his velvety baritone. Since then, through good seasons and bad, Mishael Miller has sung "The Star-Spangled Banner" at nearly every home game. His voice has become a part of the experience of attending a Ravens game - something as authentically Baltimore as the plush purple seats and the song itself, which was, of course, written here.
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