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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Half a century ago, a nearby cluster of stars appeared to astronomers as a single glowing ball of gas. As recently as 15 years ago, scientists realized it was in fact a cluster of stars but were convinced they all must have formed at the same time and with the same composition. Now astronomers at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute have found evidence that one cluster may actually be two, one a million years older than the other, in the process of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light years from Earth in an area known as the Tarantula Nebula.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gart Westerhout, an internationally known radio astronomer who established the astronomy department at the University of Maryland, College Park and was scientific director at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at the Charlestown retirement community in Catonsville. He was 85. The son of an architect and a writer, he was born and raised in The Hague, Netherlands, where he also graduated from high school. Dr. Westerhout earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics, physics and astronomy in 1950 from the University of Leiden, and earned his master's degree in the discipline in 1954.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 16, 2012
Have questions about space and the James Webb Space Telescope? John Mather, a Nobel laureate and scientist working on the telescope, will answer them on Twitter tomorrow. The telescope is slated for a 2018 launch and is seeking to find the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang, determine how they have evolved, observe star formation and investigate potential for life in other planetary systems. Tweet with the hashtag #JWSTscience and follow @NASAWebbTelescp for answers from 2-3 p.m.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Half a century ago, a nearby cluster of stars appeared to astronomers as a single glowing ball of gas. As recently as 15 years ago, scientists realized it was in fact a cluster of stars but were convinced they all must have formed at the same time and with the same composition. Now astronomers at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute have found evidence that one cluster may actually be two, one a million years older than the other, in the process of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light years from Earth in an area known as the Tarantula Nebula.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | August 4, 1993
A team of astronomers from the University of Maryland and Harvard has discovered a newborn star at the edge of our Milky Way galaxy, challenging the conventional view that stars aren't likely to form so far from the gas-rich stellar nurseries found closer to the galaxy's core."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2002
An experimental fix that astronauts made in March to the Hubble Space Telescope's broken infrared camera has it working better now than when it was new. Hubble scientists unveiled new images from the camera yesterday and told astronomers meeting in Albuquerque, N.M., that the repairs to the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer have made it 30 percent to 40 percent more sensitive than when it was installed in the orbiting observatory in...
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 11, 2012
A NASA image released Friday shows a glimpse of a galaxy with an active black hole, the focus of a recent discovery much of which was made in Baltimore. The space agency's image of the day gallery shows an active black hole squelching star formation in  galaxy Arp 220. The picture uses images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and with an artist's impression of jets of gas emanating from the core of the galaxy. Research announced May 1 revealed that astronomers at Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute observed just such a black hole.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | March 17, 2002
All this silliness with color chips and color names is not exactly what Johns Hopkins University astronomers Ivan Baldry and Karl Glazebrook had in mind. But perhaps they should have figured on stirring response when they announced that the universe itself, the unfathomably vast collective of galaxies, black holes and cosmic expanses in between, is roughly the color of Coffeemate. Exactly what to call that color is another matter, a question the two scientists are not necessarily trained nor inclined to engage.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1997
Try to imagine a star so big that it would fill all of the solar system within the orbit of Earth, which is 93 million miles from the sun. A star so turbulent that its eruptions would spread a cloud of gases spanning four light-years, the distance from the sun to the nearest star. A star so powerful that it glows with the energy of 10 million suns, making it the brightest ever observed in our galaxy, the Milky Way.A star so big and bright should be unimaginable, according to some theories of star formation.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - As if we didn't have enough troubles here on Earth, there's disturbing news from outer space. Reports just in from American and European astronomers warn that: The universe is fading, as old stars burn out faster than new ones are born. A huge storm of stardust is heading for our solar system. Fortunately, astronomers say neither of these far-off developments poses any immediate danger to people on Earth. You have time to pay off the mortgage. The stardust, however, could build up on the solar panels of spaceships, including the International Space Station, causing a gradual loss of power.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 16, 2012
Have questions about space and the James Webb Space Telescope? John Mather, a Nobel laureate and scientist working on the telescope, will answer them on Twitter tomorrow. The telescope is slated for a 2018 launch and is seeking to find the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang, determine how they have evolved, observe star formation and investigate potential for life in other planetary systems. Tweet with the hashtag #JWSTscience and follow @NASAWebbTelescp for answers from 2-3 p.m.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 11, 2012
A NASA image released Friday shows a glimpse of a galaxy with an active black hole, the focus of a recent discovery much of which was made in Baltimore. The space agency's image of the day gallery shows an active black hole squelching star formation in  galaxy Arp 220. The picture uses images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and with an artist's impression of jets of gas emanating from the core of the galaxy. Research announced May 1 revealed that astronomers at Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute observed just such a black hole.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Scientists have found the largest explosion to be detected so far since the big bang created the universe 13.7 billion years ago. It's coming from a black hole the size of our solar system and, thankfully, pretty far away - about 2.6 billion light years. (A light year is 5.9 trillion miles, or about 63,000 times the distance between the Earth and the sun.) Even so, the black hole's size and power were a shock to the astronomer who discovered it. "When I saw it, I almost fell off my chair, I was so startled by it," said Brian McNamara, a research professor at Ohio University.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - As if we didn't have enough troubles here on Earth, there's disturbing news from outer space. Reports just in from American and European astronomers warn that: The universe is fading, as old stars burn out faster than new ones are born. A huge storm of stardust is heading for our solar system. Fortunately, astronomers say neither of these far-off developments poses any immediate danger to people on Earth. You have time to pay off the mortgage. The stardust, however, could build up on the solar panels of spaceships, including the International Space Station, causing a gradual loss of power.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2002
An experimental fix that astronauts made in March to the Hubble Space Telescope's broken infrared camera has it working better now than when it was new. Hubble scientists unveiled new images from the camera yesterday and told astronomers meeting in Albuquerque, N.M., that the repairs to the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer have made it 30 percent to 40 percent more sensitive than when it was installed in the orbiting observatory in...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | March 17, 2002
All this silliness with color chips and color names is not exactly what Johns Hopkins University astronomers Ivan Baldry and Karl Glazebrook had in mind. But perhaps they should have figured on stirring response when they announced that the universe itself, the unfathomably vast collective of galaxies, black holes and cosmic expanses in between, is roughly the color of Coffeemate. Exactly what to call that color is another matter, a question the two scientists are not necessarily trained nor inclined to engage.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Scientists have found the largest explosion to be detected so far since the big bang created the universe 13.7 billion years ago. It's coming from a black hole the size of our solar system and, thankfully, pretty far away - about 2.6 billion light years. (A light year is 5.9 trillion miles, or about 63,000 times the distance between the Earth and the sun.) Even so, the black hole's size and power were a shock to the astronomer who discovered it. "When I saw it, I almost fell off my chair, I was so startled by it," said Brian McNamara, a research professor at Ohio University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gart Westerhout, an internationally known radio astronomer who established the astronomy department at the University of Maryland, College Park and was scientific director at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at the Charlestown retirement community in Catonsville. He was 85. The son of an architect and a writer, he was born and raised in The Hague, Netherlands, where he also graduated from high school. Dr. Westerhout earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics, physics and astronomy in 1950 from the University of Leiden, and earned his master's degree in the discipline in 1954.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have peered deep into the centers of spiral galaxies and found the first solid clues to the ages of those galaxies -- and to the mysteries of their evolution. Some, they say, have large central regions -- like the yolk of a fried egg -- that bulge with ancient stars. All the stars formed early in the history of the universe, and little seems to have changed in the 10 billion years since. But at the heart of other spiral galaxies -- the ones with smaller hubs of these ancient stars -- Hubble scientists say they can see dense clusters of hot young stars.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1997
Try to imagine a star so big that it would fill all of the solar system within the orbit of Earth, which is 93 million miles from the sun. A star so turbulent that its eruptions would spread a cloud of gases spanning four light-years, the distance from the sun to the nearest star. A star so powerful that it glows with the energy of 10 million suns, making it the brightest ever observed in our galaxy, the Milky Way.A star so big and bright should be unimaginable, according to some theories of star formation.
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