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Staphylococcus Aureus

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NEWS
By knight-ridder news service | September 25, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - Laboratory tests have confirmed that a patient treated last month at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, N.J., near Philadelphia, was infected by a new drug-resistant strain of a common bacteria, only the third such case documented in the world.The man was infected with a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that had moderate resistance to vancomycin, the one drug that until now has been totally effective against the bacteria.The first such case showed up in Japan in May 1996, and the second in a Michigan patient two months ago.The Camden patient's infection was successfully treated with a combination of other antibiotics.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
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HEALTH
Tim Wheeler | October 11, 2012
Living near a livestock farm may increase your risk of acquiring an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to a new study led by researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health . In reviewing data from the Netherlands, a team of Hopkins and Dutch scientists found that the odds of being exposed to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, are greatest in the southeast region of that European country, an...
HEALTH
Tim Wheeler | October 11, 2012
Living near a livestock farm may increase your risk of acquiring an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to a new study led by researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health . In reviewing data from the Netherlands, a team of Hopkins and Dutch scientists found that the odds of being exposed to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, are greatest in the southeast region of that European country, an...
NEWS
March 10, 2008
Towson SHA to hold meeting on interchange The State Highway Administration will hold a public information meeting on the Interstate 695-Charles Street interchange from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Harry C. Ruhl Armory, main drill hall, 1035 York Road, Towson. The project includes the replacement of the Charles Street bridge over I-695, interchange area improvements, and the rehabilitation of the I-695 bridge over the light rail line. SHA representatives will be available to answer questions.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK | January 27, 2006
Many Americans need look no further than their own noses to find the new bug among us. Even as hospitals and doctors report an increase in the number of people showing up with telltale signs of a drug-resistant form of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, a new study has found that the strain is finding a cozy home in the nostrils of about 2 million Americans. The study, published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases, is the first look at the prevalence of staph and the methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 4, 2007
You might want to wash your hands after reading this. After all, many other folks touched this paper (or screen, as the case may be) before you, and you don't know where their hands have been. For all you know, the last person to touch the paper was carrying Entamoeba histolyca, a parasite that causes amebiasis. You could end up with stomach cramps, bloody stools and an abscess on your liver. And that's assuming the disease doesn't spread to your lungs and brain. Or maybe the last person to use the computer recently came into contact with African green monkeys.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
FEATURES
By Mari N. Jensen and Mari N. Jensen,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 19, 1997
Like Alice in Wonderland, researchers hunting for antibiotics have to run faster and faster to stay in the same place.Although doctors have a huge arsenal of antibiotics to battle bacteria, the bugs are fighting back -- and winning.Many bacteria have developed resistance to commonly used antibiotics. In May, doctors in Japan reported that a baby boy was infected with a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is moderately resistant to vancomycin, the antibiotic of last resort. Although the Japanese case is an isolated one, doctors fear that the strain of Staphylococcus aureus could become dangerously resistant to vancomycin.
NEWS
By Ramanan Laxminarayan and Eli Perencevich | February 24, 2009
Most people come to a hospital expecting to get better. But many don't realize that on average, one in 20 patients admitted to a hospital in the United States will contract an infection during his or her stay. These infections cause a staggering 99,000 deaths per year. And a growing proportion of these infections no longer respond to a wide range of antibiotics. Doctors must turn to more costly antibiotics or ones with more side effects - if they can cure the infection at all. A 2005 report showed that hospitals could charge the cost of health care-associated infections to third-party payers such as Medicare and Medicaid.
NEWS
By Ramanan Laxminarayan and Eli Perencevich | February 24, 2009
Most people come to a hospital expecting to get better. But many don't realize that on average, one in 20 patients admitted to a hospital in the United States will contract an infection during his or her stay. These infections cause a staggering 99,000 deaths per year. And a growing proportion of these infections no longer respond to a wide range of antibiotics. Doctors must turn to more costly antibiotics or ones with more side effects - if they can cure the infection at all. A 2005 report showed that hospitals could charge the cost of health care-associated infections to third-party payers such as Medicare and Medicaid.
NEWS
March 10, 2008
Towson SHA to hold meeting on interchange The State Highway Administration will hold a public information meeting on the Interstate 695-Charles Street interchange from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Harry C. Ruhl Armory, main drill hall, 1035 York Road, Towson. The project includes the replacement of the Charles Street bridge over I-695, interchange area improvements, and the rehabilitation of the I-695 bridge over the light rail line. SHA representatives will be available to answer questions.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
For Kerri Cardello McKoy, mother of four, a trip to the hospital to treat a broken nose in 2003 seemed routine. But what followed wasn't: a raging MRSA infection that cost her both legs below the knee, a collapsed lung and four months in a hospital bed, much of it in a drug-induced coma. "When I think about it, it makes me want to cry," she says. Almost five years later, public health officials, hospitals and legislators are still arguing over the best way to curb MRSA, the drug-resistant bug that cost the Annapolis woman her legs and could be killing up to 19,000 people a year nationwide.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | November 15, 2007
With flu season and the MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) staph infection upon us, we are urged to wash our hands frequently, usually "with warm, soapy water." My memories of Bacteriology 101 aren't clear, but I can't recall that warm water kills anything. Soapsuds, on the other hand, do carry nasty things away. Is there any science behind the "warm water" suggestion? You are absolutely right that warm water is no more effective than cold for removing germs. Soap and water don't kill germs, but only wash them off the surface of the skin.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 4, 2007
You might want to wash your hands after reading this. After all, many other folks touched this paper (or screen, as the case may be) before you, and you don't know where their hands have been. For all you know, the last person to touch the paper was carrying Entamoeba histolyca, a parasite that causes amebiasis. You could end up with stomach cramps, bloody stools and an abscess on your liver. And that's assuming the disease doesn't spread to your lungs and brain. Or maybe the last person to use the computer recently came into contact with African green monkeys.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK | January 27, 2006
Many Americans need look no further than their own noses to find the new bug among us. Even as hospitals and doctors report an increase in the number of people showing up with telltale signs of a drug-resistant form of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, a new study has found that the strain is finding a cozy home in the nostrils of about 2 million Americans. The study, published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases, is the first look at the prevalence of staph and the methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA)
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | November 15, 2007
With flu season and the MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) staph infection upon us, we are urged to wash our hands frequently, usually "with warm, soapy water." My memories of Bacteriology 101 aren't clear, but I can't recall that warm water kills anything. Soapsuds, on the other hand, do carry nasty things away. Is there any science behind the "warm water" suggestion? You are absolutely right that warm water is no more effective than cold for removing germs. Soap and water don't kill germs, but only wash them off the surface of the skin.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
For Kerri Cardello McKoy, mother of four, a trip to the hospital to treat a broken nose in 2003 seemed routine. But what followed wasn't: a raging MRSA infection that cost her both legs below the knee, a collapsed lung and four months in a hospital bed, much of it in a drug-induced coma. "When I think about it, it makes me want to cry," she says. Almost five years later, public health officials, hospitals and legislators are still arguing over the best way to curb MRSA, the drug-resistant bug that cost the Annapolis woman her legs and could be killing up to 19,000 people a year nationwide.
NEWS
By knight-ridder news service | September 25, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - Laboratory tests have confirmed that a patient treated last month at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, N.J., near Philadelphia, was infected by a new drug-resistant strain of a common bacteria, only the third such case documented in the world.The man was infected with a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that had moderate resistance to vancomycin, the one drug that until now has been totally effective against the bacteria.The first such case showed up in Japan in May 1996, and the second in a Michigan patient two months ago.The Camden patient's infection was successfully treated with a combination of other antibiotics.
FEATURES
By Mari N. Jensen and Mari N. Jensen,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 19, 1997
Like Alice in Wonderland, researchers hunting for antibiotics have to run faster and faster to stay in the same place.Although doctors have a huge arsenal of antibiotics to battle bacteria, the bugs are fighting back -- and winning.Many bacteria have developed resistance to commonly used antibiotics. In May, doctors in Japan reported that a baby boy was infected with a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is moderately resistant to vancomycin, the antibiotic of last resort. Although the Japanese case is an isolated one, doctors fear that the strain of Staphylococcus aureus could become dangerously resistant to vancomycin.
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