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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
At 7 p.m. Saturday in MICA's Brown Center, David Simon, the creator of "The Wire," will host Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory" and explain why it's just as pertinent and powerful today as it was in 1957. That's when this movie first appeared — and was promptly banned in France for 18 years because of its savage debunking of the conduct of the French army in World War I. Kubrick uses a suicide mission to expose civilized European savagery. He gives us military stupidity in microcosm with this tale of autocratic leaders ( Adolphe Menjou, George Macready)
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
At 7 p.m. Saturday in MICA's Brown Center, David Simon, the creator of "The Wire," will host Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory" and explain why it's just as pertinent and powerful today as it was in 1957. That's when this movie first appeared — and was promptly banned in France for 18 years because of its savage debunking of the conduct of the French army in World War I. Kubrick uses a suicide mission to expose civilized European savagery. He gives us military stupidity in microcosm with this tale of autocratic leaders ( Adolphe Menjou, George Macready)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie Critic | January 26, 2007
There were two Stanley Kubricks. First came the Bronx-bred wunderkind with a chip on his soldier the size of the Triborough Bridge, ready to take on veteran Hollywood craftsmen and even producer-actors such as Kirk Douglas. This fellow came up with a parade of smart, groundbreaking features from The Killing to 2001: A Space Odyssey. Wrestling with dominating stars or maneuvering with money-men helped imbue Kubrick's films with uncanny connections to life as it is lived, even when his scenarios went back in time or out of this world.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
David Simon has repaid a long-held literary debt — with interest. On Tuesday, Penguin Classics reissues "Paths of Glory," Humphrey Cobb's surgically sharp novel of the First World War. To Simon, Cobb's 1935 rendering of a doomed French assault and its calamitous aftermath has repercussions that go beyond its immediate anti-war themes. He hears Cobb's characters every time he listens to BP executives trying to explain destructive actions taken for short-term gains. And when bureaucrats assess Hurricane Katrina with "we all did our best" cliches, they remind him of French generals rationalizing the debacles of Verdun.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 8, 1999
Stanley Kubrick, whose dark vision of human nature seemed to suffuse each of his movies, died yesterday at his home outside London. He was 70. The cause of death was not released.Kubrick was that rare director who left an imprint on every work, regardless of the genre. "The Killing" (1956), a taut crime drama starring Sterling Hayden, was a classic, gritty film noir; "Paths of Glory" (1957) was an elegantly filmed indictment of the hypocrisy of the military in World War I; "Lolita" (1962)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 12, 2001
"Everybody pretty much acknowledges he's the man," Jack Nicholson says of director Stanley Kubrick, "and I still feel that underrates him." That's pretty much the tenor of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a 2 1/2 -hour documentary on the legendarily spotlight-shunning filmmaker, made with the cooperation of his family and premiering at 7:30 tonight on Cinemax. Produced and directed by Kubrick's longtime assistant Jan Harlan (who was also his brother-in-law), the film includes interviews with family members, co-workers and a host of actors from his films, including Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Matthew Modine, Malcolm McDowell, Keir Dullea, Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise (who also narrates)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 16, 1999
"Eyes Wide Shut," the final film of director Stanley Kubrick, presents the late filmmaker's admirers with a tantalizing but ultimately confounding coda to one of the most formidable bodies of work in the cinema.The psychological portrait of a marriage at a pivotal moment, "Eyes Wide Shut" raises some fascinating questions about commitment, intimacy, sexuality and the power of imagination in relationships. And Kubrick's last gasp, which was bound to be a haunting final statement, will surely leave filmgoers with a lingering sense of the mysteries that abound in every emotional transaction.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 29, 2001
In a summer when all pictures have a moment that makes an audience gasp and ask whether a landscape, a stunt or even a character is "real," Steven Spielberg has centered an entire movie on that question. Set in the suburban Northeast in the mid-21st century, "A.I. Artificial Intelligence" tells the story of a prototype android little boy - a pallid tyke named David (Haley Joel Osment). He is the first android to generate dreams and spontaneous emotions. He's the first one capable of love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
David Simon has repaid a long-held literary debt — with interest. On Tuesday, Penguin Classics reissues "Paths of Glory," Humphrey Cobb's surgically sharp novel of the First World War. To Simon, Cobb's 1935 rendering of a doomed French assault and its calamitous aftermath has repercussions that go beyond its immediate anti-war themes. He hears Cobb's characters every time he listens to BP executives trying to explain destructive actions taken for short-term gains. And when bureaucrats assess Hurricane Katrina with "we all did our best" cliches, they remind him of French generals rationalizing the debacles of Verdun.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
MAX RAAB, 81 Film producer, clothes maker Max Raab, a trend-setting clothes manufacturer and executive producer of A Clockwork Orange, has died. He had struggled with Parkinson's disease. Philadelphia Funeral home Joseph Levine & Sons confirmed Mr. Raab's Feb. 21 death. Mr. Raab, a Philadelphia native, invented the shirt-dress, owned Villager clothes and produced several films, including Walkabout in 1970. Mr. Raab later became interested in movies. He bought the rights to Anthony Burgess' book A Clockwork Orange and sold them to Stanley Kubrick, who directed the film.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie Critic | January 26, 2007
There were two Stanley Kubricks. First came the Bronx-bred wunderkind with a chip on his soldier the size of the Triborough Bridge, ready to take on veteran Hollywood craftsmen and even producer-actors such as Kirk Douglas. This fellow came up with a parade of smart, groundbreaking features from The Killing to 2001: A Space Odyssey. Wrestling with dominating stars or maneuvering with money-men helped imbue Kubrick's films with uncanny connections to life as it is lived, even when his scenarios went back in time or out of this world.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 29, 2001
In a summer when all pictures have a moment that makes an audience gasp and ask whether a landscape, a stunt or even a character is "real," Steven Spielberg has centered an entire movie on that question. Set in the suburban Northeast in the mid-21st century, "A.I. Artificial Intelligence" tells the story of a prototype android little boy - a pallid tyke named David (Haley Joel Osment). He is the first android to generate dreams and spontaneous emotions. He's the first one capable of love.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 12, 2001
"Everybody pretty much acknowledges he's the man," Jack Nicholson says of director Stanley Kubrick, "and I still feel that underrates him." That's pretty much the tenor of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a 2 1/2 -hour documentary on the legendarily spotlight-shunning filmmaker, made with the cooperation of his family and premiering at 7:30 tonight on Cinemax. Produced and directed by Kubrick's longtime assistant Jan Harlan (who was also his brother-in-law), the film includes interviews with family members, co-workers and a host of actors from his films, including Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Matthew Modine, Malcolm McDowell, Keir Dullea, Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise (who also narrates)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 16, 1999
"Eyes Wide Shut," the final film of director Stanley Kubrick, presents the late filmmaker's admirers with a tantalizing but ultimately confounding coda to one of the most formidable bodies of work in the cinema.The psychological portrait of a marriage at a pivotal moment, "Eyes Wide Shut" raises some fascinating questions about commitment, intimacy, sexuality and the power of imagination in relationships. And Kubrick's last gasp, which was bound to be a haunting final statement, will surely leave filmgoers with a lingering sense of the mysteries that abound in every emotional transaction.
NEWS
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 8, 1999
Stanley Kubrick, whose dark vision of human nature seemed to suffuse each of his movies, died yesterday at his home outside London. He was 70. The cause of death was not released.Kubrick was that rare director who left an imprint on every work, regardless of the genre. "The Killing" (1956), a taut crime drama starring Sterling Hayden, was a classic, gritty film noir; "Paths of Glory" (1957) was an elegantly filmed indictment of the hypocrisy of the military in World War I; "Lolita" (1962)
NEWS
May 16, 1994
* Timothy Carey, 65, a heavy-eyed character actor whose films ranged from "Paths of Glory" and "One-Eyed Jacks" to 1960s beach movies, died Wednesday in Los Angeles after suffering a stroke, his family said yesterday. Mr. Carey's acting career began with a part in Billy Wilder's 1951 movie "The Big Carnival" and included more than 50 feature films and many television roles, often as a villain. Some of his most recognized roles were in Stanley Kubrick's "The Killing" (1956) and "Paths of Glory" (1957)
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By Stephen Hunter | March 8, 1991
The venerable Senator Theatre, on York Road, has slated a "most-requested" festival with a program of 70-mm "roadshow" pictures.The theater will show "West Side Story" beginning Friday for a week; "The Sound of Music" from March 22-April 4; "Doctor Zhivago" April 5-18; "Ben-Hur" April 19-May 2; and, on May 3, the newly restored print of what many critics at the time called the most intelligent epic ever made, Stanley Kubrick's great "Spartacus," with Kirk...
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