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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 3, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 3, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
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By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 2, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
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By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 2, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 9, 2000
Theatre Hopkins has opened its 2000-2001 season with Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning 1947 play, "A Streetcar Named Desire." Cherie Weinert stars as faded Southern belle Blanche DuBois, and Jim Gallagher is her crude brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski, under Suzanne Pratt's direction. The play marks the theater's first Williams drama in more than 20 years. Here's the rest of the season: "Faith Healer," by Brian Friel (Feb. 23-March 25); "She Loves Me," by Joe Masteroff, Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick (April 20-May 20)
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May 6, 2004
Stage At the age of 28, Adam Rothenberg is grappling with one of theater's iconic roles -- Stanley Kowalski in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, at the Kennedy Center. page 14 Family Port Discovery celebrates its fifth birthday with a little help from the Peanuts gang. page 34 Art Evergreen's biennial sculpture exhibit -- featuring curious, cunning and otherwise unexpected objects such as this scale-model tea house -- opens Saturday. page 16 Eats Yabba Pot brings a vegan flavor to the Charles Village area, with a changing-daily menu that draws from Caribbean, Africa, Asia and the American South.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 3, 1997
Fifty years ago today, Tennessee Williams' landmark drama, "A Streetcar Named Desire," opened on Broadway. The account of the conflict between Blanche DuBois, a faded Southern belle, and her abusive brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski, won every major award, including the Pulitzer Prize.Elia Kazan directed a cast headed by Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter and Jessica Tandy, whose performance as Blanche made her a star. In his memoirs, Williams wrote: "It was instantly apparent to me that Jessica was Blanche."
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | April 21, 1994
Arthur Mitchell, who created the Dance Theatre of Harlem 25 years ago, believes in the power of youth. On Tuesday, his company opened a two-week engagement at the Kennedy Center Opera House with "Bach Passacaglia," a dance that featured 40 young local dancers along with DTH principals Christina Johnson, Tai Jimenez, Eddie J. Shellman and Donald Williams.It was one of those performances when the dance was secondary to what was actually happening -- 40 children were given the chance to become part of Mitchell's dream, to become one of his "seeds" of the future.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 23, 1995
At Towson, festival ends with 'Circus'Towson State University's 1995 Maryland Arts Festival concludes with five performances of Theatricks' "Circus Berserkus" in the Studio Theatre in the Fine Arts Center, Osler and Cross Campus drives.Maryland-based Theatricks specializes in innovative family entertainment and features company co-founder Tom Dougherty, a former Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus clown. Show times are 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. July 29; and 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. July 30. Tickets are $7. For more information, call (410)
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By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1997
Brendan Schneck, who starred at both Navy and Johns Hopkins, is included in a class of five men and five women elected to the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame.A ceremony honoring the inductees will be held June 6 at the Baltimore Hilton and Towers.Schneck, an attackman-midfielder, earned All-America honors at Navy in 1978 and at Hopkins in 1980 and 1981. He played on two U.S. men's teams in the 1980s and was named to the All-World Team in 1982. Schneck was named to the NCAA's 25th anniversary team in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 11, 2004
They're usually Southern, generally outsiders, often fragile, narcissistic, living in the past and, above all, very feminine. They are the classic heroines in the plays of Tennessee Williams, whose work is being celebrated in "Tennessee Williams Explored," a four-month festival at Washington's Kennedy Center. Highlighted by new all-star productions of A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and The Glass Menagerie, the festival gets under way tomorrow with a symposium titled "Women of Tennessee."
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By Paul Moore and By Paul Moore,Sun Staff | February 20, 2000
"Burt Lancaster: An American," by Kate Buford. Alfred A. Knopf. 430 pages. $27.50. Burt Lancaster was a Hollywood movie star who sought independent and challenging projects before it became fashionable for actors to "stretch." No other star would, at the peak of his popularity, have chosen to portray a vicious and cynical New York City newspaper columnist in "The Sweet Smell of Success" (a box-office failure that is now considered one of the great movies of the 1950s). What distinguishes Lancaster's career, as Kate Buford proves in her authoritative and unflinching biography, is that he did not seek recognition and fame.
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