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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 10, 1999
Individual tickets for the "Big Game" between Stanford and the University of California on Nov. 20 are the most expensive in college football this season.The $50 price for the top general admission seat is more than the $43 average price for an NFL game last season, and neither Stanford nor Cal is ranked in any major poll.It's almost twice the price of the top general admission ticket to the Florida-Florida State game in Gainesville, also on Nov. 20 -- and that matchup likely will help decide the national championship.
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SPORTS
By Mike Terry and Mike Terry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 27, 2005
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Today's Kansas City Regional game between Stanford and Connecticut, which have won seven NCAA women's basketball championships between them, is the kind of matchup most basketball fans would want to see in a Final Four, or at least a regional final. Instead, it will be the second semifinal game following Michigan State-Vanderbilt. Stanford (31-2), seeded second, has done its best to downplay any disappointment about not getting a No. 1 seed in this year's tournament after ending the regular season as the nation's top-ranked team.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
ST. LOUIS -- When he opens his mouth he's extremely soft-spoken, almost to a point where you have to strain to hear. His demeanors is polite almost to a fault, and he's not particularly imposing with a body frame that's not yet developed.So it's pretty unlikely that a guy like Stanford reserve forward Jarron Collins would stand out in last night's Midwest Region semifinal against Purdue, not in a game that lived up to its billing of being extremely physical. But that's exactly what he did, matching a career-high with 12 points and grabbing a career-high 10 rebounds as he led Stanford to a 67-59 win over Purdue.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1995
If playing a nationally respected team like Stanford can be used as a measuring stick, the Navy basketball team did a lot of growing up last night before 1,817 at Alumni Hall.The final score of 80-62 was hardly an indication of how tough the Midshipmen (4-3) played the veteran-laden Cardinal, which was tabbed as a Top 25 team in most of the preseason polls.With 4:25 remaining, Navy trailed 63-56 after a three-point shot by Michael Heary (21 points). But Stanford (4-2) held the Mids without a field goal for the next four minutes and gained a commanding 77-57 lead.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER hTC | December 12, 1998
RICHMOND, Va. -- As the final horn sounded, forward Pierre Venditti shot a quick look at the scoreboard in disbelief and threw his hands to his face.Walking off the field, coach Sasho Cirovski could only shake his head angrily, while defender Beckett Hollenbach glared at the goal post that had become Maryland's worst enemy.Outplaying Stanford for most of the game, the Terrapins saw their best NCAA tournament run in three decades end with a cruel, 1-0 national-semifinal loss to the Cardinal yesterday before 17,616 at University of Richmond Stadium.
SPORTS
By Jeff Fletcher | October 7, 1991
Notre Dame settled a year-old score with Stanford in a businesslike manner Saturday night in Stanford, Calif."Revenge alone is not going to do it. You have to carry out the game plan," said fullback Jerome Bettis, who did his part by scoring four touchdowns in No. 7 Notre Dame's 42-26 victory over Stanford (1-3).Last year, Stanford upset Notre Dame, 36-31, knocking the Fighting Irish out of the top spot in the polls."We felt we had a good game plan [Saturday night]," Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz said.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1998
ST. LOUIS -- His Rhode Island teammates were gone. So were the coaches. But Cuttino Mobley remained. Bent over at the waist, his eyes staring dejectedly at the floor, Mobley got a good feel for the Stanford celebration around him. It was a celebration that, minutes before, he thought he'd be a participant in.But it was Stanford whopartied yesterday, taking advantage of an epic Rhode Island collapse that was as sudden as it was unexpected. It resulted in a 79-77 win that gave the Cardinal the Midwest Regional title and a trip to San Antonio for next week's Final Four.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
SAN ANTONIO - Kentucky needed nearly 30 minutes to catch up with Stanford last night at the, Alamodome. The Wildcats also needed the rest of regulation and the entire over time to beat the Cardinal, 86-85, in the first NCAA tournament semifinal game and advance to their third straight championship game.But the one-point difference doesn't tell how close Stanford actually came to winning the first overtime semifinal in five years.It might have been the difference between the steal Stanford freshman Jarron Collins tried to make in the is backcourt with six seconds to play, instead tying up Scott Padgett with the possession arrow pointing Kentucky's way. It might have been the difference between the steal Arthur Lee thought he had on the ensuing inbounds pass with six seconds to play, instead watching Kentucky point guard Wayne Turner retrieve the ball.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
Amanda White, Dulaney's nationally ranked swimmer and distance runner, yesterday chose Stanford University over Michigan to continue her athletic and academic endeavors.A three-time All-Metro Runner of the Year in cross country and a two-time Runner of the Year in track, White last year became the first undergraduate to win The Baltimore Sun's Female Athlete of the Year Award."It wasn't one little thing as much as everything combined," White said last night. "I just ranked everything I liked about the schools in order.
BUSINESS
By MATTHEW KEENAN and MATTHEW KEENAN,BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 25, 2005
BOSTON -- Yale University's David Swensen, who oversees the school's $15.2 billion endowment, produced the highest returns among managers at the richest U.S. universities, beating his competitors at Stanford and Harvard with investments in hedge funds, real estate and private equities. Swensen's fund rose 22.3 percent in the fiscal year that ended June 30, followed by Stanford University's 19.5 percent and Harvard University's 19.2 percent, according to a Bloomberg survey of the 25 largest college endowments.
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