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NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | March 19, 1991
Washington. Caught red-handed padding its research bills for the federal government, Stanford University has responded with an extravaganza of alibis that should dispel fears that creativity is on the wane in America.As the story unfolded at a congressional hearing last week, Stanford, the academic jewel of the West, was bubbling with ideas for explaining away the yacht, the presidential wedding party, flowers and linens, the antique Italian commode, the trustees' meeting at a Lake Tahoe resort, and the university-owned shopping center.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | April 8, 2004
Lauren Centrowitz will continue to wear red even after she completes her high school career at Broadneck. The senior, who wears burgundy for the Bruins' cross country and track and field programs, will move up to a slightly brighter shade of red at Stanford next fall. Centrowitz, The Sun's two-time All-Metro Runner of the Year in cross country, said she chose Stanford over North Carolina, Notre Dame and Villanova for its balance. "What I was looking for was a great program to continue my running career," said Centrowitz, who plans to major in journalism.
SPORTS
By Don Markus Rosters | March 28, 1998
What: NCAA semifinalWhere: Alamodome, San AntonioWhen: 5: 42 p.m. todayTV/Radio: Chs. 13, 9/WBAL (1090 AM)Line: Kentucky by 8 1/2How they got here: Kentucky finished the regular season with a 26-4 record and won the Southeastern Conference tournament, earning an automatic bid. As the No. 2 seed in the South Regional, the Wildcats defeated South Carolina State, 82-67; Saint Louis, 88-61; UCLA, 94-68, and Duke, 86-84. Stanford finished the regular season with a 26-4 record. Since the Pac-10 doesn't have a postseason tournament, the Cardinal earned one of 34 at-large bids and was a No. 3 seed in the Midwest Regional.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | September 12, 1990
IT WASN'T so much the man but his calling card, reading "Athletic Director Stanford University," that impressed the University of Maryland. The 14-member search committee isn't saying how much research it conducted but when Andy Geiger expressed an interest it was struck with almost childish glee. Awe, too. All because he came from Stanford.So it was Geiger who won the golden opportunity to succeed Lew Perkins, who came to Maryland after serving at Wichita State. The automatic question is why would anyone want to leave Stanford, richly endowed and with enormous prestige, for the discontent and ongoing problems at Maryland?
SPORTS
November 19, 1990
Eight years later, Stanford got even.In 1982, California defeated Stanford on what has become known as "The Play," a five-lateral kickoff return through the Stanford band. On Saturday night, John Hopkins kicked a 39-yard field goal on the game's last play, as Stanford defeated Cal, 27-25.But the key was what happened before Hopkins' kick."The way we won," said Stanford tailback Glyn Milburn, "this is the way to get back. This was the 'The Play II: The sequel.' ""The Play II" stretched over about five minutes and encompassed not only four plays and two penalties, but several thousand Cal fans as well.
SPORTS
By Annette John-Hall and Annette John-Hall,Knight-Ridder | December 16, 1991
STANFORD, Calif. -- This week's polls will show that third-ranked Stanford is the No. 1 team in the nation after its 96-95 overtime victory over Tennessee on Saturday night. But coach Tara VanDerveer isn't so sure.But coach Tara VanDerveer isn't so sure."When the clock ran out, we just happened to be ahead," said VanDerveer, whose Cardinal improved to 5-0.It was that kind of game -- draining and with numerous shifts of momentum, but thoroughly entertaining for the crowd of 5,522, the largest ever to see a regular-season women's game at Stanford.
SPORTS
By Annette John-Hall and Annette John-Hall,Knight-Ridder | April 6, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Bobbie Kelsey and Nicki Sevillian, two reserves on the Stanford women's basketball team, took it upon themselves to pull off the final play of the season yesterday.While the rest of the Cardinal team was celebrating its second NCAA championship in three years, they zeroed in on the water cooler. And they let coach Tara VanDerveer have it with a winner's shower.But VanDerveer didn't need an ice-cold dousing to open her eyes about this team, which roared through the NCAA tournament with five victories and culminated a 30-3 season with a 78-62 victory over Western Kentucky in the title game.
SPORTS
August 11, 2006
Angela Stanford thought about playing a conservative shot from a tricky downhill lie in the 14th fairway. Instead, she talked herself into an aggressive play and ended up hitting the best shot of the best round of her life. Stanford deftly faded her 7-iron approach around a large greenside tree to set up a tap-in birdie, the last of her eight birdies in a bogey-free 64 yesterday that matched the lowest round in the history of the Canadian Women's Open in London, Ontario. "I think I've learned over the last couple of months when I start being conservative, and I don't just hit the shot that I'm feeling I should hit, that's when I get into trouble," said Stanford, three strokes ahead after the first round.
SPORTS
December 25, 1991
Stanford and Georgia Tech have a lot at stake in today's Jeep Eagle Aloha Bowl.For the 17th-ranked Cardinal (8-3), it's a chance to show college football that Stanford is becoming a national power.Georgia Tech (7-5) is trying to forget a season of unfilled expectations."A win will make it a really good season," said Yellow Jackets coach Bobby Ross, said to be the top candidate for the vacant San Diego Chargers job. "A loss will make it just a good season."The game will match the speedy Yellow Jackets defense against the multiple attack of Stanford.
NEWS
By Jeff Gottlieb and Jeff Gottlieb,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 6, 1990
STANFORD, Calif. -- Stanford University has been charging taxpayers for depreciation on a 72-foot sailboat with a Jacuzzi and two wood-burning stoves, for use of athletic facilities and for faculty discounts on tickets to basketball and football games -- all in the name of research.After a congressional subcommittee questioned items Stanford billed the federal government for research, the university agreed to repay $184,286 it charged for depreciation on the yacht and on other athletic department equipment, including smaller sailboats, racing sculls, computers and a prefabricated building.
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