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NEWS
August 13, 1998
THE $48.2 BILLION merger of BP with Amoco flows from weak oil profits caused by overproduction by Third World countries. It will create the third biggest oil company in the world, after Exxon, which was once Standard Oil of New Jersey, and Royal Dutch/Shell.BP Amoco will also unite the legacies of giants.One was John D. Rockefeller, who founded Standard Oil of Ohio in 1870, a monopoly until broken in 1911. Another was William Knox D'Arcy, an Englishman whose investments a century ago became the Anglo-Persian Oil Co., later British Petroleum, now BP.A third was Louis Blaustein, who left Standard Oil to found the American Oil Co. in 1910.
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NEWS
October 19, 2008
GEORGE KELLER, 84 Former Chevron chairman George Keller, who oversaw the formation of Chevron Corp. in what was then the largest corporate takeover, died Friday in Palo Alto, Calif. The former chairman and chief executive died of complications from orthopedic surgery. As chairman of the Standard Oil Co. of California, Mr. Keller executed the company's $13.3 billion takeover of Gulf Oil to form Chevron in 1984. The deal was considered risky at the time.
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NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
Exxon Corp. and Mobil Corp. formally announced their blockbuster merger yesterday, saying they intend to reunite two pillars of the fabled Standard Oil monopoly and surpass General Motors as the biggest corporation in the United States.The proposed combination, disclosed last week, faces hurdles from U.S. and European regulators as well as protests by environmentalists and consumer groups.But Exxon Chairman Lee Raymond said he's confident about completing the merger in mid-1999."There are some very clear advantages," Raymond said.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
John W. Anderson, a former Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey salesman, filling station owner and World War II veteran, died of complications from a stroke Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ocean Pines resident was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens, Mr. Anderson graduated from McDonogh School in 1938. He worked for Standard Oil before enlisting in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Mr. Anderson, a bombardier and navigator aboard B-17s, was assigned to a base in North Africa.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The judge in the Microsoft Corp. antitrust trial actively challenged the software giant's counsel yesterday during courtroom arguments, reacting at times with open skepticism. But U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson gave no outward indication how he might rule on the legal issues of the case, which he is expected to do this spring. At one point, Jackson compared Microsoft, the world's largest software company, to John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Co., the subject of a celebrated 19th century antitrust controversy.
NEWS
October 19, 2008
GEORGE KELLER, 84 Former Chevron chairman George Keller, who oversaw the formation of Chevron Corp. in what was then the largest corporate takeover, died Friday in Palo Alto, Calif. The former chairman and chief executive died of complications from orthopedic surgery. As chairman of the Standard Oil Co. of California, Mr. Keller executed the company's $13.3 billion takeover of Gulf Oil to form Chevron in 1984. The deal was considered risky at the time.
NEWS
April 20, 1997
Mary French Rockefeller, 86, who worked for years on behalf of the YWCA and donated her family homestead in Woodstock, Vt., for a national park, died Thursday of injuries from a fall at her Manhattan apartment. She was the granddaughter of 19th century railroad president and conservationist Frederick Billings, and the wife of Laurance S. Rockefeller, a grandson of Standard Oil Co. founder John D. Rockefeller.Pub Date: 4/20/97
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
FOR MORE THAN three decades, the building at 501 St. Paul Place housed local offices of Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey, Western Maryland Railway and Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland, among others.It might soon be reborn as one of Baltimore's newest apartment complexes, if a Silver Spring-based developer moves ahead with a proposed conversion.Baltimore's Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals approved plans last week by Omega Development II LLC to convert the 15-story building to 143 apartments, with two levels of office space and on-site parking for 44 cars.
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall and J. Leffall,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
Amoco Corp., which became part of the largest oil acquisition yesterday, has its roots in Baltimore, where petroleum pioneer and Baltimorean Louis Blaustein established American Oil Co. in 1910 and laid the foundation for an industry.More than 88 years later, British Petroleum Co. said yesterday that it will buy Amoco for $53 billion in stock and assumed debt in a deal that would create an oil colossus with $108 billion in annual revenue.The takeover would be the largest of a U.S. company by a company overseas, eclipsing the buyout of Chrysler Corp.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
John W. Anderson, a former Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey salesman, filling station owner and World War II veteran, died of complications from a stroke Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ocean Pines resident was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens, Mr. Anderson graduated from McDonogh School in 1938. He worked for Standard Oil before enlisting in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Mr. Anderson, a bombardier and navigator aboard B-17s, was assigned to a base in North Africa.
NEWS
September 14, 2003
Yukio Okutsu, 81, who was awarded the Medal of Honor 55 years after single-handedly wiping out three German machine-gun positions in the battle for an Italian hill during World War II, died Aug. 24 in Hilo, Hawaii, of cancer. On April 7, 1945, Mr. Okutsu's platoon in the Japanese-American 442nd Regimental Combat Team was halted by machine-gun crossfire during the fighting for Mount Belvedere, astride the road leading north to Bologna. He crawled to within 30 yards of one enemy emplacement and killed its three gunners by hurling two hand grenades.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2002
You may know it as the Standard Oil Building, a handsome dinosaur looming over St. Paul Place in downtown Baltimore. Now, like Madonna and Cher, it has just one name -- the Standard -- and is the latest in what its developers describe as "luxury" living. The 15-story office tower built for the Rockefellers' oil empire 80 years ago has undergone a $25 million makeover, giving it 202 apartments. Workers have restored marble and brass and added new touches such as high-speed Internet access.
NEWS
September 12, 2002
Woodrow Harry Kratz, who devised a system for the automatic delivery of fuel oil and later operated an air-conditioning and cleaning-solvents business, died of respiratory failure Sept. 5 at Bonnie Blink Masonic Home in Cockeysville. He was 89, and a former Sparks resident. Mr. Kratz was born and raised in West Baltimore and graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1929. While working as a route dispatcher for Standard Oil Co. in Baltimore in the early 1930s, Mr. Kratz came up with the idea of automatic fuel delivery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
William B. Purpura Sr., a former ship's cook who survived four torpedo attacks during World War II and later became a chef at the famed Meadowbrook in Cedar Grove, N.J., died of cancer Friday at the Veterans Medical Center in downtown Baltimore. He was 89 and lived at Elkridge Estates in North Baltimore. Born in Rochester, N.Y., to immigrant parents from Sicily, Mr. Purpura was reared in Passaic, N.J. He dropped out of school when he was 16, lied about his age and joined the Navy in 1928.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
John Owen Bracken Sr., a retired Exxon official and World War II naval officer, died Saturday of stroke complications at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 87 and lived in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. A sales and marketing specialist for the Standard Oil Co., later Esso and Exxon Mobil, he was the company's liaison with many area construction projects from the 1940s to the 1960s. He sold oil products needed in the construction of the former Friendship Airport, Baltimore Harbor Tunnel, Maryland's portion of Interstate 95, and Washington Dulles International Airport.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2001
George S. Goodhues Jr., former president and owner of a Baltimore company that cleaned the tanks of barges and oil tankers, died Sunday of pneumonia at Sinai Hospital. He was 83. The former Homeland and Mays Chapel resident had lived at Brightwood retirement community in Brooklandville since last summer. Mr. Goodhues was the scion of an old Baltimore waterfront family. His grandmother ran a boarding house for sailors. She also had another business that operated the so-called "slop chests" that were placed on board ships and contained cigarettes, tobacco, clothing and other items that were sold to crew members.
NEWS
September 12, 2002
Woodrow Harry Kratz, who devised a system for the automatic delivery of fuel oil and later operated an air-conditioning and cleaning-solvents business, died of respiratory failure Sept. 5 at Bonnie Blink Masonic Home in Cockeysville. He was 89, and a former Sparks resident. Mr. Kratz was born and raised in West Baltimore and graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1929. While working as a route dispatcher for Standard Oil Co. in Baltimore in the early 1930s, Mr. Kratz came up with the idea of automatic fuel delivery.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The judge in the Microsoft Corp. antitrust trial actively challenged the software giant's counsel yesterday during courtroom arguments, reacting at times with open skepticism. But U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson gave no outward indication how he might rule on the legal issues of the case, which he is expected to do this spring. At one point, Jackson compared Microsoft, the world's largest software company, to John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Co., the subject of a celebrated 19th century antitrust controversy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOSEPH R. L. STERNE and JOSEPH R. L. STERNE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2000
In the continuing struggle between monopolists and antitrusters, neither wins. Only technology triumphs; technology and the innovative forms of economic organization it spawns. When the trustbusters broke up Standard Oil in 1911, John D. Rockefeller was already losing some of his dominance as oil-drilling technology and ,the advent of the auto were creating a market irresistibly luring powerful competitors. Yet it was hardly a moment for cork-popping at the Department of Justice. For Rockefeller had it right.
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