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By JOE MURRAY | November 27, 1992
Angelina County, Texas. -- I wish they'd make a movie called ''Inez X,'' all about a hero of the civil-rights movement.This movie would take place in my little hometown of Lufkin, Texas. The first thing you'd find out was that Inez was a man, not a woman. The name would always be a problem for him, but not his biggest problem. His biggest problem was that he was a man who was black.I think I would want to begin the movie with Inez pushing a broom at the foundry, a job he had most of his life.
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FEATURES
By Judy Markey and Judy Markey,United Feature Syndicate | November 21, 1990
THIS IS ABOUT taking a stand on a moral issue.And then untaking it.And then saying to yourself, "What a fabulous lesson this will be for my children. To watch me, an actual adult, acknowledge that I was initially wrong about an ethical quandary. To see that I am capable of listening to the other side, reflecting on it and admitting that I could no longer defend my original position. Boy, is that one swell lesson, or what?"This sure is what Philip thought would happen when, after serious reflection and angst, he did a 180 on a stand he had been defending for the past two weeks.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1994
FREDERICK -- Chris Schmitt feels guilty. He's landed in the hospital four times since November, leaving his partner Harry Kemp to farm their 10 acres abounding with fruits and vegetables.Theirs is a partnership, if not made in heaven then surely %J conceived in the rich earth underfoot. The two neighbors on a forested hillside near Gambrill State Park just west of Frederick have farmed together nearly 20 years.They were in their 60s when they started. That Mr. Kemp is now 82 is incidental.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
It's 37 degrees and a cold, misty rain is falling. Not exactly farmers' market kind of weather, but hundreds of people have bundled themselves up in parkas and raincoats to shop at the outdoor Waverly market, the only one in the Baltimore area open year-round. Some shoppers balance umbrellas with their bags as they stroll from stand to stand; others just hunch their shoulders to keep the icy rain from going down the backs of their collars. It seems to be getting colder, wetter and grayer as the morning wears on. But as bleak as it is, this is a pretty good day for the market.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1998
This week, five Today writers document signs of spring.The first pitch. No.The first robin. No.The first crocus. No.Those are shopworn signs of spring. For 8-year-old Roman Rachuba, the season officially begins on a sunny afternoon in April when his mother picks him up after school and they head to Opie's, that tiny wooden stand on Edmonson Avenue in Catonsville.The first snowball.Yes. Oh, yes."It's kind of a ritual when the weather gets warm," Michelle Rachuba says. Her son, lost in a snowball coma, was too busy digging into a spearmint and sky blue treat to chat.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 6, 1997
IN CASE YOU haven't noticed it, we're squarely in the middle of Baltimore's annual snowball avalanche.The vendors set up their ice crushers on corners, on parking lots, on hot sidewalks. Some have the luxury of a fixed location, maybe an air-conditioned confectionery store.One recent broiling Sunday I counted four separate snowball stands that had popped up outdoors on Reisterstown Road between Park Circle and Pikesville.Each stand had its own entrepreneurial character. Some were a little more business-like because their stands were a little more permanent.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
Doug Sergeant was a young, three-piece-suit banker 25 years ago when hundreds of thousands of America's young counterculture went looking for free love, peace and a good time at Woodstock.But standing on a Catonsville park-and-ride lot yesterday with an assortment of young and old, the gray-haired, 52-year-old conservative-turned-hippie was on his way to this weekend's Woodstock '94, the festival marking the silver anniversary of the monumental rock concert.He and more than 200 others were headed to upstate New York to sell food for the Ellicott City-based Boardwalk Fries, which has been subcontracted as one of a handful of vendors to feed the estimated 170,000 concertgoers.
NEWS
By This article was reported by Sun staff writers Dan Fesperman, Ivan Penn, Lisa Respers and Craig Timberg and written by Fesperman | January 18, 1998
It would seem to be the simplest of stories. A politician gets caught making money in ways that he shouldn't, then his embarrassed colleagues vote to expel him.But when the politician is black and the powers that oust him are mostly white, simple things can get complicated in a hurry.Whether out of genuine anguish or political opportunism, supporters of ousted state Sen. Larry Young tapped into old, deep channels of black pain and mistrust when they rose to Young's defense last week by invoking the most divisive theme in American culture: race.
NEWS
By Rebecca Helm-Ropelato | March 28, 2007
ROME -- The tall Steven Seagal double standing just beyond the security check at Beauvais Airport outside Paris earlier this year spoke to me as I picked up my purse from the conveyor belt and motioned to me to open it. I lifted the flap on the front pocket and removed the first thing my fingers touched. It was a glossy, gold-colored tube of lipstick I had paid extortionist rates for a couple of months before. No, he shook his head. I pulled out the next thing. It was a glass vial of throat spray for my allergies.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | February 11, 1991
I GOT A PROBLEM," Slats Grobnik said. "See, I'm behind our troops over there, but I don't know what to do about it. I don't wanna just sit around watching Blitz Woofer and these other TV guys. I wanna do something."No problem. Have you thought about flying a flag above your home?"What good will that do?"Well, I suppose it would let your neighbors know that you feel patriotic."I don't care what my neighbors think. All I want from them is not to walk their dogs on my front grass, the slobs.
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