Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStand Up
IN THE NEWS

Stand Up

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | September 27, 2007
Amy Schumer transformed into a Baltimorean during her college years at Towson University. A 2003 graduate, Schumer never imagined that four years later she would be returning to Charm City to perform stand-up comedy as one of the top four on NBC's Last Comic Standing. As a theater major, she appeared on stage at Towson in such productions as Stop Kiss, Picasso at the Lapin Agile and The Prime of Ms. Jean Brodie. Born in Manhattan and having grown up in Long Island, Schumer began performing in New York comedy clubs about a year after graduating, quickly realizing that her theater experience helped her feel comfortable in front of the mike.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When Republican Larry Hogan and Democrat Anthony G. Brown discuss the business climate in Maryland, it seems as if the gubernatorial rivals are talking about two different states. Hogan's Maryland is a terrible place to do business, a state where companies and residents are streaming for the borders to escape oppressive taxation and capricious regulations. His remedy: tax and spending cuts coupled with business-friendly appointments to regulatory agencies. Brown's Maryland is the state with the highest household median income and a blue-chip AAA bond rating, where top-quality educational resources and strategic investments fuel the nation's No. 1 entrepreneurial culture.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1994
Reaching her childhood dream "is harder than anything I've ever done," asserts Rosie O'Donnell. No joke.Stand-up comedy, television work and movie roles don'tcompare to the difficulty of performing in live theater, says the performer, who portrays tough gal Betty Rizzo in the Broadway-bound revival of "Grease," playing at the National Theatre in Washington through March 12.What has been so hard about her first stage play?"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
The roadside root beer stand's orange contours memorialize this venerated shrine to a different era. Its fans make pilgrimages to this Stewart's franchise on Pulaski Highway, a truck-battered stretch of U.S. 40 in eastern Baltimore County, to recall the food experiences of their youth. This is the place where it seemed a little cooler in the days before broiling city neighborhoods such as Highlandtown or Canton had air conditioning. Suburban Rosedale was the summer destination when the sun was bright, the humidity was high and school was a distant notion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1995
Robert Klein sounds like an athlete making a comeback."I had to ask myself, 'Can I do this?' " he relates in a recent telephone interview. "The answer is yes. The show's come back. . . . They're going to see me pretty sharp."The comedian/actor is talking about performing stand-up comedy again after a hiatus of a few years. On Sunday, he'll present "A Night of Laughter" at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium, a benefit for the Sheppard Pratt Care for Kids Fund.The show represents an on-the-road tryout of material Mr. Klein is planning for an "HBO Comedy Hour" special, to be taped next month at Haverford College in Pennsylvania for a December telecast.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
Say, have you heard the one about the lawyer with the multi-million-dollar practice who becomes a stand-up comedian?Really. This is a killer.You know the lawyer, Stephen L. Miles. All right, "former Assistant State's Attorney Stephen L. Miles." For those unfamiliar with technical legal language, that translates to: "did not make Law Review."But seriously.The man made his professional stand-up debut at the Comedy Factory in Baltimore Friday. Yes, the Stephen L. Miles, the guy in the "Let's Talk About It" television ads, the man who has parlayed personal injury and drunken driving cases into an eight-office operation with a monster advertising budget.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 23, 1996
Across 3,000 miles of telephone wire, Dan Rosen is articulating his deeply felt wonder and delight at having written a movie, "The Last Supper," which is scheduled to hit his Baltimore hometown later this week."
FEATURES
By Murry Frymer and Murry Frymer,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 30, 1992
Comic Roxanne Reese is on stage at Los Angeles' Comedy Store, finishing her act. "And now," she says, "a real big welcome for a man who's too legit to quit."A big welcome it is. The audience stands, claps and cheers. And then, in the corner, he enters: Richard Pryor, the angry, profanity-spewing comic who started it all for angry black comedians.It's a really big welcome for a man who now looks very little, walking onto the stage, holding the arm of his assistant. There is a dazed little grin on his face.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 23, 2003
It wasn't exactly the Road to Damascus. But an L.A. freeway was a great place for Bobcat Goldthwait to have a revelation. "I went, `Bobcat? How did I become Bobcat?' " he says, his familiar voice cracking and searching for an octave it no longer hits. "My fiancee looks at me, and I just keep saying, `How did this happen? I'm 41 years old!' " Yes, he's really 41. As to how Robert became "Bobcat," that goes back to his teen years, when he and his childhood friend, the future SpongeBob Tom Kenny, were "Bobcat and Tomcat."
NEWS
By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | October 8, 2006
Anthony Luewellyn is dressed in a black three-piece suit and black-checkered brim hat. It is an unusually conservative outfit for a man with a job that is decidedly unconventional. He is center stage, and all around him are children screaming with joy, smiling parents, trapeze artists and circus animals, all waiting for the UniverSoul Circus to begin. Luewellyn, who goes by the stage name Tony Tone, is in his first year as the ringmaster for the African-American big top, developed by Baltimorean Cedric Walker in 1994.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
Thank you to Raymond Daniel Burke for his article about the tragic shooting of McKenzie Elliott, a 3 year old in the way of a stray bullet ( "Apathetic no more," Aug. 5). Until and unless we have public servants with a backbone to the gun lobby, nothing will change and there will be another tragic death very soon. The so-called smart gun was even rejected by gun lobby. If anything there are more guns everywhere, and the trend is to continue. Perhaps we will have to amend the Constitution in order to really get a handle on gun violence.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Wonderful article by Caroline Poplin ( "A costly victory for Israel," Aug. 7). As a Palestinian American - one of the "moderates" she mentions - I know that it is vital for Palestinians and Israelis to live side-by-side in peace. Many people I speak to express hopelessness about the situation, but I believe peace is not only achievable but inevitable. Leaders on both sides must take a hard look at how this continuing unresolved conflict is destroying a generation of young people on both sides and do what is needed to end it. It's not too late for peace.
NEWS
By Jacob Simpson | July 31, 2014
I am a proud Baltimore native and have been a Ravens fan since the football team moved here in 1996. I am also a pastor and an advocate against domestic violence and rape culture. The behavior of running back Ray Rice, who was accused of knocking out his then fiancee (now wife) during an altercation in Atlantic City, has embarrassed me enough to question being a Ravens fan. The pathetic punishment from the NFL — a two game suspension — has made me question my continued support for the league.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
Supporters of the League of the South can debate all they want whether their organization is truly a neo-Confederate hate group, as the Southern Poverty Law Center has classified them, but it would be much harder to argue that it isn't an oddball extremist group with some hair-raising ideas. That they support Southern secession and rally behind all things Confederate pretty much defines the Alabama-based league. These are not just some folks who spend their free hours dressing up in Civil War garb, whistling “Dixie” and recalling the good old days.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
After months of resisting U.S. calls for tougher economic sanctions against Russia in response to its support for separatist rebels in Ukraine, the major European powers agreed yesterday on a package of measures targeting Russia's financial, energy and military sectors that in some cases go even farther than the actions the U.S. itself has taken. Whether that will be enough to alter Russian President Vladimir Putin's calculations in the covert war he is waging in Ukraine remains to be seen.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
The citizens of Carroll County are speaking out. They do not want illegal immigrants there ( "Harris opposes Carroll County immigrant shelter," July 11). Why doesn't Rep. Chris Van Hollen speak out as Rep. Andy Harris has done and support them? Makes one wonder, doesn't it? F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1999
Mo'Nique has big plans.Actually, Mo'Nique's always had big plans, whether as a full-figured model or as a stand-up comic whose routines play off that full figure.But the Baltimore native, who abandoned Charm City (and the comedy club she had opened at Liberty and Fayette streets) to seek fame, fortune and a high-profile career on the West Coast, finally has an opportunity to take that next big step. Tuesday, she'll be featured on an episode of UPN's "Moesha" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WUTB, Channel 24)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,Sun Staff | April 21, 2005
When Dustin Diamond calls from the latest stop on his stand-up comedy tour, the voice on the phone is not that of Samuel "Screech" Powers, the eternally geeky character he played for 11 years on the TV show Saved by the Bell and its offshoots. Diamond's voice is more scratchy than screechy as he has been awake for only 10 minutes and is recovering from last night's performance in a smoky club in Pittsburgh. Diamond, the 28-year-old former child star, began doing stand-up five days after Saved by the Bell: The New Class ended in 2000.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
This spring, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took some long-overdue steps to fix the Clean Water Act, ending confusion over which streams and wetlands are protected by the law. Loopholes in the law created over the past decade have left more the half the stream miles in the U.S. and drinking water sources for 100 percent of Baltimore City residents at risk from pollution and development. Polluters and their allies in Congress are fighting tooth and nail to block the EPA from taking this common sense step to protect clean water.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The traditional strength of the Johns Hopkins program is showing up at the right time. With Sunday's 14-8 victory over eighth-seeded Virginia in an NCAA tournament first-round game, the Blue Jays (11-4) have limited six of their last seven opponents to under 10 goals. And with the Cavaliers going scoreless for a 20 minute, 29 second stretch and an 18 minute, 17 second stretch, the defense has shut out opponents for 15 minutes or longer 15 times this season. Coach Dave Pietramala said Johns Hopkins had better defensive showings in a 13-8 win against Albany on April 4 and an 11-6 victory over Maryland on April 12, but said the team improved as the contest developed against Virginia (10-6)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.