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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Create a fragrance that smells heroic with a touch of villainy - that's what Andrew Levine's Lutherville company set out to do. Considering the name on the bottle, it makes sense. The new Stan Lee's Signature Cologne trades on the geek popularity of a comic-book-industry icon who had a hand in creations spanning the good-evil continuum - from Spider-Man, the Avengers and the X-Men to Loki, Magneto and Doctor Doom. Lee wanted the fragrance to smell like they would smell.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Create a fragrance that smells heroic with a touch of villainy - that's what Andrew Levine's Lutherville company set out to do. Considering the name on the bottle, it makes sense. The new Stan Lee's Signature Cologne trades on the geek popularity of a comic-book-industry icon who had a hand in creations spanning the good-evil continuum - from Spider-Man, the Avengers and the X-Men to Loki, Magneto and Doctor Doom. Lee wanted the fragrance to smell like they would smell.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Stan Lee is one proud father these days. You'd be proud, too, if your progeny included Spider-Man, Iron Man, Thor and the Fantastic Four — characters whose films routinely bring in a few hundred million dollars at the movie box office. Not that Lee has much to do with the movies themselves: His connection is restricted to a largely honorary executive-producer credit and a cameo in each film — as a swinging Hugh Hefner-type in "Iron Man," mailman Willie Limpkin in "Fantastic Four," an Army general in this summer's "Captain America.
EXPLORE
August 18, 2011
Classic comics, indie comics and more will be featured at the 12th Annual Baltimore Comic-Con, happening Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 20-21, at the Baltimore Convention Center. The event boasts a huge guest list of comic book creators and artists and will feature as a guest of honor Stan "The Man" Lee, the co-creator of the Spider-Man and Hulk comics, among others. Tickets are $30 for two-day admission. (One-day admission tickets are also available.) Hours are Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Go to http://www.baltimorecomiccon.com . Wine and jazz Fiore Winery will hold its annual Wine, Jazz and Art Festival Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 20-21, noon-6 p.m., at 3026 Whiteford Road, in Pylesville.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | March 31, 2009
Beverly Hills -Stan Lee sits in his Santa Monica Boulevard office, surrounded by images of his creations: A life-size statue of the Amazing Spider-Man, a poster of the Incredible Hulk, a desktop figure of Ben Grimm, aka The Thing. And then there's his Dell desktop computer. He has yet to master it (give the man a break, he's 86 years old). But he embraces it as a creative tool - and sees it as the next frontier for the comic books he helped turn from a kids' amusement to one of the world's most fertile and influential entertainment media.
FEATURES
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | July 8, 1991
New York -- With their industry in a slump, organizers of the recent American Booksellers Association conference chose as a speaker a man responsible for the sale of more books than anyone since King James.So what if Stan Lee's characters have been bitten by radioactive spiders, belted by gamma-rays, or otherwise altered in galactic maelstroms? They grieve, fear, ponder, worship, transgress, regret and love just like ones created by other authors, just a little more frequently, intensely, and in color.
FEATURES
By John Wolfson and John Wolfson,Orlando Sentinel | July 15, 2003
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Janet Clover says she's a nobody, just a 38-year-old stripper with no clout and not much money. But that doesn't give a bunch of rich New Yorkers the right to rip off her life story, she says, to turn it into smutty, animated entertainment. So Clover, known as JC, filed a lawsuit this week against one of the country's most powerful media companies. She doesn't want money, she insists. She just wants Viacom and its cable-television subsidiary The New TNN to cancel the adult cartoon Stripperella.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | August 28, 2000
They sell records faster than a speeding bullet! They're able to leap over other boy bands in a single bound! So why shouldn't the superstar Backstreet Boys become superheroes, too? Yesterday, the official B-Boys Web site (www.backstreetboys. com) began featuring the fab five as "The Cyber Crusaders," the first online animated series created for a pop group. Twenty-two biweekly "webisodes" make up the series, which was created by comic book giant Stan Lee. You'll be hearing a lot about the Crusaders.
EXPLORE
August 18, 2011
Classic comics, indie comics and more will be featured at the 12th Annual Baltimore Comic-Con, happening Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 20-21, at the Baltimore Convention Center. The event boasts a huge guest list of comic book creators and artists and will feature as a guest of honor Stan "The Man" Lee, the co-creator of the Spider-Man and Hulk comics, among others. Tickets are $30 for two-day admission. (One-day admission tickets are also available.) Hours are Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Go to http://www.baltimorecomiccon.com . Wine and jazz Fiore Winery will hold its annual Wine, Jazz and Art Festival Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 20-21, noon-6 p.m., at 3026 Whiteford Road, in Pylesville.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER TRIBUNE | May 22, 1999
"Peanuts." The editorial cartoons of Herblock. "The Fantastic Four." And "Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary."Those are just a few of the offerings you'll find on the Comics Journal's Top 100 (English-Language) Comics of the Century, an eclectic list that has sparked spirited debate among comics fans.Which, of course, is one of the points of the list.There's a "certain provocation" in putting out such a list, acknowledges Kim Thompson, vice president of Seattle-based Fantagraphics Books, which publishes the monthly Comics Journal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Stan Lee is one proud father these days. You'd be proud, too, if your progeny included Spider-Man, Iron Man, Thor and the Fantastic Four — characters whose films routinely bring in a few hundred million dollars at the movie box office. Not that Lee has much to do with the movies themselves: His connection is restricted to a largely honorary executive-producer credit and a cameo in each film — as a swinging Hugh Hefner-type in "Iron Man," mailman Willie Limpkin in "Fantastic Four," an Army general in this summer's "Captain America.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | March 31, 2009
Beverly Hills -Stan Lee sits in his Santa Monica Boulevard office, surrounded by images of his creations: A life-size statue of the Amazing Spider-Man, a poster of the Incredible Hulk, a desktop figure of Ben Grimm, aka The Thing. And then there's his Dell desktop computer. He has yet to master it (give the man a break, he's 86 years old). But he embraces it as a creative tool - and sees it as the next frontier for the comic books he helped turn from a kids' amusement to one of the world's most fertile and influential entertainment media.
FEATURES
By John Wolfson and John Wolfson,Orlando Sentinel | July 15, 2003
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Janet Clover says she's a nobody, just a 38-year-old stripper with no clout and not much money. But that doesn't give a bunch of rich New Yorkers the right to rip off her life story, she says, to turn it into smutty, animated entertainment. So Clover, known as JC, filed a lawsuit this week against one of the country's most powerful media companies. She doesn't want money, she insists. She just wants Viacom and its cable-television subsidiary The New TNN to cancel the adult cartoon Stripperella.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | August 28, 2000
They sell records faster than a speeding bullet! They're able to leap over other boy bands in a single bound! So why shouldn't the superstar Backstreet Boys become superheroes, too? Yesterday, the official B-Boys Web site (www.backstreetboys. com) began featuring the fab five as "The Cyber Crusaders," the first online animated series created for a pop group. Twenty-two biweekly "webisodes" make up the series, which was created by comic book giant Stan Lee. You'll be hearing a lot about the Crusaders.
FEATURES
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | July 8, 1991
New York -- With their industry in a slump, organizers of the recent American Booksellers Association conference chose as a speaker a man responsible for the sale of more books than anyone since King James.So what if Stan Lee's characters have been bitten by radioactive spiders, belted by gamma-rays, or otherwise altered in galactic maelstroms? They grieve, fear, ponder, worship, transgress, regret and love just like ones created by other authors, just a little more frequently, intensely, and in color.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 9, 2011
Thor, the Marvel Comics superhero, hammered his way into movie theaters over the weekend, saving the world, winning Natalie Portman and grossing about $66 million. Kenneth Branagh's "Thor" is based on Stan Lee's Thor, which is based on the Thor of Norse mythology — god of thunder and protector of mankind. Some pioneering scientists of the early 19th century were so taken with Thor's immortal powers that they named a radioactive element after him. Nearly two centuries later, some modern scientists, including a Nobel Prize laureate, believe thorium could play a major role in saving mankind from global warming.
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