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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A House committee is preparing today to slash the federal food stamp program by more than 10 percent over the next five years, chiefly by freezing or eliminating benefits, as part of a broader Republican drive to overhaul the welfare system.The plan that the Agriculture Committee will consider is a compromise offered by the committee chairman, Rep. Pat Roberts, a Kansas Republican. His plan would soften the blow of proposed food stamp cuts on the farmers, grocers and agribusiness executives who profit from the program.
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NEWS
October 29, 2013
Grocery prices may be rising - 1.5 to 2.5 percent next year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture - but the ability of poor people to buy them is about to shrink. On Friday, benefits for 47.6 million Americans participating in the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), more commonly referred to as food stamps, will be reduced. The size of that reduction is substantial - about $5 billion per year nationwide - and it amounts to about $36 less for a low-income family of four or $11 for an individual.
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NEWS
July 18, 2000
NO ONE waited to apply for food stamps or any other social service last Wednesday afternoon at the Howard County social services office east of Columbia. Surprised? You shouldn't be. Since 1995, the number of Howard County residents participating in the food stamp program has dipped 31 percent. The caseload of welfare recipients has fallen 86 percent, whittled down by reform rules and a robust economy. But is there more to the story? Has the stigma of the dole dissuaded eligible families from applying for help?
NEWS
December 8, 2009
W hen it comes to helping people weather the effects of a recession, few things are as effective as food stamps. The benefits go to those most desperately in need, and because they must be spent on essential goods, they serve as an immediate boost to the local economy. But it only works if the benefits get in the hands of the right people. That's why it's troubling to see Maryland lagging behind other states when it comes to enrolling eligible families for the benefits and processing the applications of those who seek food stamps.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration announced yesterday that it has completed one of the biggest changes in the history of the food stamp program, replacing paper coupons with electronic benefits and debit cards. At the same time, the administration said it wants to rename the program because the term "food stamps" has become an anachronism. It is also inviting the public to suggest how to rechristen a program that became a permanent part of the government during the vast overhaul of government assistance and anti-poverty programs by President Lyndon B. Johnson, known as the Great Society.
NEWS
November 8, 1991
The federal food stamp program has always been a safety net with very large holes. Last year, Congress tried to patch some of them so those who deserve help would have an easier time getting it. But when Bush administration officials tried to translate Congress' mandate into regulations recently, the kinder and gentler rhetoric faded fast into sloganeering.The most glaring example is a proposed change in the way government deals with the complex forms that millions of recipients are required to fill out every month to get benefits.
NEWS
By Pete Hershberger and Sandy Rosenberg | April 17, 2008
Congress must pass a farm bill so that millions of working Americans - rural, urban and suburban - won't go hungry. The Congressional Budget Office predicts that about 28 million people will be using food stamps by October, the most since the program's inception more than 40 years ago. States already are seeing the effect of hard economic times, as many of our residents turn to the food stamp program so their families can eat. Here in Maryland, one...
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee proposed yesterday to keep the school lunch program intact, rejecting House legislation that would turn it over to the states and limit spending.Sen. Richard G. Lugar's proposal, welcomed by the Clinton administration, was included in a bill that would scale back nutrition programs for the poor.The House welfare bill passed in March would give the states TC "block grant" to run the program and end the guarantee of a school lunch for every poor child.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1994
The owner of several Baltimore-area Shop and Save Meats stores has been indicted on charges of food stamp fraud.Cornell Crawford, 47, of Perry Hall and his employees exchanged cash for food stamp benefits totaling more than $1 million, according to an indictment unsealed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Usually they made the exchange at a discount, offering about 70 cents on the dollar, according to prosecutors, who said the scheme operated between March 1992 and December 1993.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Rooted in the food assistance programs that brought farm surpluses to the bread lines of the Great Depression in the 1930s, food stamps have become America's "second currency" -- a refuge of last resort for the mounting millions whose earnings do not meet their needs.But even as the number of food stamp recipients scales new heights -- up 3 million this year to a record 23.6 million nationwide -- a congressional committee has accused the Bush administration of undercutting efforts to make the $22 billion program more accessible to the needy.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones , brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
A Baltimore County woman's lawsuit against the state for failing to provide food stamps in a timely manner is scheduled to go to court Monday, days after the release of data showing that only 59 percent of eligible Marylanders were receiving the government assistance. The state has fallen to 41st in the nation in the percentage of eligible families receiving food stamps, according to 2007 data released by Advocates for Children and Youth and based on numbers calculated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | November 15, 2009
Barbara Sachau of Florham Park, N.J., writes: As I understand it, the [federal] Duck Stamp sale raised $60,000 this year. Chump change. ... This program has not saved any land in the last 30 or 40 years. It is not a self-sustaining program at all. It costs general taxpayers to run it. It is simply propaganda for killing ducks. That is who buys these stamps primarily - people who kill ducks. Why you fall for this [junk] is beyond the pale. ... Why don't you look into it? Outdoors Girl replies: I assume you are writing because of the Oct. 18 Baltimore Sun article about the winner of the 2010-11 Duck Stamp competition, Maryland artist Robert Bealle.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | May 11, 2008
Earlier this year, cornerback Samari Rolle was shocked when he went to his locker. His clothes were gone. So were his family pictures and his nameplate. "I didn't know if I was still on the team," Rolle said. Rolle was still part of the team, but the Ravens' old ways of living were clearly gone. In one of his first moves after taking over for Brian Billick, Ravens coach John Harbaugh shook up the locker room, mixing offensive linemen with defensive ones and putting linebackers next to quarterbacks.
NEWS
By Pete Hershberger and Sandy Rosenberg | April 17, 2008
Congress must pass a farm bill so that millions of working Americans - rural, urban and suburban - won't go hungry. The Congressional Budget Office predicts that about 28 million people will be using food stamps by October, the most since the program's inception more than 40 years ago. States already are seeing the effect of hard economic times, as many of our residents turn to the food stamp program so their families can eat. Here in Maryland, one...
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration announced yesterday that it has completed one of the biggest changes in the history of the food stamp program, replacing paper coupons with electronic benefits and debit cards. At the same time, the administration said it wants to rename the program because the term "food stamps" has become an anachronism. It is also inviting the public to suggest how to rechristen a program that became a permanent part of the government during the vast overhaul of government assistance and anti-poverty programs by President Lyndon B. Johnson, known as the Great Society.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
NO ONE waited to apply for food stamps or any other social service last Wednesday afternoon at the Howard County social services office east of Columbia. Surprised? You shouldn't be. Since 1995, the number of Howard County residents participating in the food stamp program has dipped 31 percent. The caseload of welfare recipients has fallen 86 percent, whittled down by reform rules and a robust economy. But is there more to the story? Has the stigma of the dole dissuaded eligible families from applying for help?
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified the workplace of Andrew Littlejohn, a former Baltimore grocery bagger sentenced in a food stamp fraud scheme. He worked at Lafayette Market.The Sun regrets the errors.Wrapping up perhaps the largest food stamp fraud case in Maryland history, a federal judge yesterday sentenced a former Baltimore grocery bagger to 2 1/2 years in prison for his role in bilking nearly $500,000 from the stamp program.Andrew Littlejohn, 33, is the seventh employee of the now-defunct Shop and Save Meats -- which operated meat and produce stalls at Lexington Market -- to be sent to prison.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | July 27, 1997
IN ITS ZEAL to cut welfare spending last year, Congress slashed some $30 billion from nutrition programs.When President Clinton signed the "Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act," he promised that restoring these cuts was one of his priorities.This year, that promise seems little more than an empty bowl.Consider the food stamp program, which took the hardest hit with a cut last year of $27.7 billion. In implementing that reduction, the program had to make cuts across the board, reducing benefits for families with children, as well as the working poor, the elderly and the disabled.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | July 27, 1997
IN ITS ZEAL to cut welfare spending last year, Congress slashed some $30 billion from nutrition programs.When President Clinton signed the "Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act," he promised that restoring these cuts was one of his priorities.This year, that promise seems little more than an empty bowl.Consider the food stamp program, which took the hardest hit with a cut last year of $27.7 billion. In implementing that reduction, the program had to make cuts across the board, reducing benefits for families with children, as well as the working poor, the elderly and the disabled.
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