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By STEVE CHAPMAN | September 3, 2007
In most countries, the future is impossible to predict, but the past doesn't change. In Russia, it's just the opposite. President Vladimir V. Putin, when he is not busy restoring autocracy to a country that has known little else, has taken on the task of refreshing Russian history with a novel perspective - his own. He is on record lamenting the collapse of the Soviet Union as "the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the century." It was worse, apparently, than World War I, worse than World War II - worse, even, than the creation of the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
October 24, 2011
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: STAKHANOVITE When you have met, or even better, exceeded, your weekly production quota, you can congratulate yourself on your Stakhanovite labors. The word (pronounced sta-KAN-oh-vyte) comes from the Soviet Union of the 1930s, where Aleksei Grigorevich Stakhanov, a coal miner, was held up as an example of the efficient, heroically laboring worker.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 9, 1995
Russian directors sometimes make movies the way Russian generals cleared minefields: by marching through them without noticing the casualties. Crude, but effective.That's exactly true of Nikita Mikhalkov's "Burnt By the Sun," the Russian film that won the Oscar this year as best foreign movie: It's crude but effective.Moreover, it bravely confronts the cruel Soviet past, that epoch of infanticidal cannibalism in the late '30s when Stalin guided the revolution into an orgy of eating its own children.
NEWS
December 22, 2008
OLGA LEPESHINSKAYA Bolshoi Ballet ballerina Olga Lepeshinskaya, the Bolshoi Ballet's prima ballerina for three decades during the Soviet era, died Saturday of an unspecified illness, said Nataliya Uvarova, a spokeswoman for Russia's Culture Ministry. Ms. Lepeshinskaya was born to a noble family in Kiev. When she first tried to enter the Bolshoi choreographic school, she was rejected. The school admitted her shortly afterward, in 1925, and Ms. Lepeshinskaya graduated in 1933, immediately joining the Bolshoi Ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | May 30, 1999
"The Autobiography of Joseph Stalin," by Richard Lourie. Counterpoint. 320 pages. $25.The image of Stalin, one of the great mass murderers of the 20th century, reaches us a little blurred by World War II. Hitler's grotesque personality and the colossal evil he inspired has long been dissected and displayed. The man born as Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili remains a murkier figure. Lurking in the collective American memory of the Soviet tyrant is the stern yet good-hearted Uncle Joe, our steadfast ally against the German fascists.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 1995
MOSCOW -- As the leaders of Russia, and much of the world, prepare to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the victory over the Nazis in World War II, a victory that cost this country 27 million lives, a vexing problem has developed:What about Josef V. Stalin, the central figure of post-revolutionary Soviet history, the transplanted Georgian who led Russia to victory in war, made it a great industrial power, defeated Adolf Hitler and is justly considered one...
NEWS
By Philip Taubman | March 13, 1996
NEW YORK Though Josef Stalin died 43 years ago, he torments Russia to this day.As Russians prepare for a presidential election in June, a revived Communist Party is struggling with the still volatile issue of Stalin and his legacy. Gennadi Zyuganov, the party's presidential candidate, seems wary of condemning one of the founding architects of the Soviet state, yet fearful of embracing him. Other Communists openly defend Stalin as a great leader.The blood of millionsAmericans find it hard to understand how Russians could regard Stalin with respect, and even admiration.
FEATURES
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 26, 1991
You never knew when you walked into the 100-foot-long dining room at Josef V. Stalin's dacha, one old Bolshevik said, whether you'd walk out, still a trusted member of the dictator's inner circle, or be dragged out, your name having been added to the list of the enemies of the people.This room, with its light-wood paneling and milky-white light fixtures, its corner fireplace and view of the birch woods surrounding the dacha, was the heart of terror: a terror that held an entire nation in its grip, that sent perhaps 30 million to their deaths.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
Religion, feminism, nationalism: Many and large are the forces behind the continuing glorification of Joan of Arc. People tend to forget, Loyola College professor Kelly DeVries writes in his book, "Joan of Arc, A Military Leader" (Sutton, 242 pages, $27.95), that the young 15th century woman from Lorraine who called herself Jehanne was "a soldier, plain and simple." She didn't mull over issues and strategy, from rear-area safety; she was in the forefront of battle, sword in hand and recognizable by her banner and doublet.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | November 20, 1992
HBO lost its Joseph Stalin halfway between the script and the screen.The ambitious, meticulously photographed film has its moments, but in the end, it drowns in a mass of rubber-face, glue and cosmetics.This big-name, skillion-dollar production, lavishly photographed on location in some of the very places Stalin lived and ruled from 1924 to 1953, gets lost in pounds of Silly Putty applied too heavily to actor Robert Duvall's face.There are other problems with HBO's "Stalin," which premieres tomorrow night.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 28, 2008
DENVER - Free speech at the Democratic National Convention this week is where you find it. Near Market Street, maybe, not far from the Pepsi Center, where delegates hear party pronouncements in well-scripted speeches. Here, a nicely dressed man reads aloud feverishly from the Bible, as if the end were near. No one seems to be listening. On the opposite corner stands a woman calling herself Nuclia Waste, representing a magazine called 5,280. (A mile-high periodical - get it?) She draws a few curiosity seekers.
FEATURES
October 30, 2007
Oct. 30 1961 The Soviet Party Congress unanimously approved a resolution ordering the removal of Josef Stalin's body from Lenin's tomb.
NEWS
By Richard Schickel | September 25, 2007
An exhibition at a New York museum celebrating the Abraham Lincoln Brigade - a band of left-wing, largely communist American volunteers who fought against Francisco Franco in the Spanish Civil War about 70 years ago - is criticized by anti-Stalinist historians for its hagiographic bias. That was in March. An article co-written by a Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer of J. Robert Oppenheimer suggests that former State Department official Alger Hiss was not a Soviet spy in the 1930s after all. In it, another State Department functionary is posthumously identified as the spy - although he is obviously innocent - and the article is contemptuously (and justifiably)
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | September 3, 2007
In most countries, the future is impossible to predict, but the past doesn't change. In Russia, it's just the opposite. President Vladimir V. Putin, when he is not busy restoring autocracy to a country that has known little else, has taken on the task of refreshing Russian history with a novel perspective - his own. He is on record lamenting the collapse of the Soviet Union as "the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the century." It was worse, apparently, than World War I, worse than World War II - worse, even, than the creation of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Albert Kilberg, a retired clothing manufacturing executive, died of a heart attack Monday at his home in Harper House in Cross Keys. He was 92. Mr. Kilberg, the son of Russian immigrant parents, was born in Baltimore and raised on Ann Street. One of seven siblings, he helped support his family by delivering Yiddish newspapers. He was a 1933 graduate of City College. During World War II, he served as a captain in the Army Supply Corps in the European theater of operations. Mr. Kilberg played a pivotal role in procuring and delivering supplies needed for the historic Yalta Conference that was held early in 1945.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun foreign reporter | November 18, 2006
MOSCOW -- Stalin didn't write thank-you notes. As a matter of fact, the former Soviet Communist Party head never even cared to see most of the gifts sent from well-wishers near and far: a wooden pipe carved with the likeness of him and President Harry S. Truman playing chess; a telephone in the shape of a hammer and sickle; a table lamp fashioned from a scaly, petrified armadillo. "Stalin didn't like them and didn't pay any attention to them," said Nikolai Ssorin-Chaikov, co-curator of an exhibit on gifts to Soviet and Russian leaders now showing in Moscow.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 23, 1992
Svetlana Stalin, daughter of the late Soviet dictator who earned more than $1.7 million from two best-selling books, has been found penniless and living in a London charity hostel, a British paper reported yesterday.She's registered at the seedy west London neighborhood lodgings under her married name of Lana Peters.Said the hostel's head: "I only found out who she was after she was given a place. As far as I know she met all our criteria for admission in that she was someone 'presenting problems' and in housing need.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Special to the Sun | December 19, 2004
Stalin and His Hangmen: The Tyrant and Those Who Killed for Him By Donald Rayfield. Random House. 576 pages. $29.95. Working and living in Russia for eight years, I found myself asking one question again and again. I never got a satisfying answer. Watching as they suffered, patiently and endlessly, reporting as their government robbed them, falsely imprisoned them and sometimes even killed them, I wanted to know why Russians rarely fought back. Why weren't they storming the Kremlin, demanding jobs, justice and decent government?
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 29, 2005
MOSCOW - Russians remember the Siege of Leningrad - a brutal, 872-day blockade of Russia's second-largest city by Nazi troops that killed 1.7 million people - as a dark, crucial moment in their history. Yet one of the most popular history textbooks in Russian classrooms casually distills the event into a mere four words. "German troops blockaded Leningrad." Glaring omissions abound in Nikita Zagladin's textbook, History of Russia and the World in the 20th Century. The Holocaust is never mentioned.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sixty years and three months after Josef Stalin, Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt met at Yalta on the Black Sea and laid out spheres of influence for postwar Europe, President Bush managed to raise the ghost of the famous conference. In choosing to visit Latvia before celebrating in Moscow the 60th anniversary of World War II's end in Europe, the president poked his friend President Vladimir V. Putin in the eye at a time when his objective was to shore up relations.
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