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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
A group of Johns Hopkins University students have turned a staircase into a giant keyboard. It took about five hours for members of the Hopkins Robotics Club to wire a staircase in Hackerman Hall to sound like a piano, according to a university web site . As you walk up, the first step chimes "C," the next "D" and so on, up the stairs. Some students and professors have mastered the fancy footwork to play a song on the musical stairs.  One club member can play " Frere Jacques " by hanging onto the banisters and kicking his feet up the steps.  Club members told The Hub , a university web site, that they hoped the project would spark an interest in robotics.   
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
A group of Johns Hopkins University students have turned a staircase into a giant keyboard. It took about five hours for members of the Hopkins Robotics Club to wire a staircase in Hackerman Hall to sound like a piano, according to a university web site . As you walk up, the first step chimes "C," the next "D" and so on, up the stairs. Some students and professors have mastered the fancy footwork to play a song on the musical stairs.  One club member can play " Frere Jacques " by hanging onto the banisters and kicking his feet up the steps.  Club members told The Hub , a university web site, that they hoped the project would spark an interest in robotics.   
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BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun reporter | March 2, 2008
What do you do after you've married off your daughter, watched her glide down your oak-floored foyer's sweeping Gone With the Wind staircase and through the glass-paneled double doors? Well, if you're Sharon and Bob Yellon, you sell the house. No, not to pay for the wedding, but to move on to other challenges - and other homes. The Yellons built this custom, executive estate home off Falls Road in 2005. It's not the place where they raised their family, but it is the place that upped their interest in planning and designing new homes.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Old Catonsville boasts turn-of-the-last-century buildings and schools, fine restaurants, antiques and music shops, and a library. But scattered among the Victorian structures are Arts and Crafts-style homes built in the early 20th century. It is in one of these that the Shaw family resides, just blocks off of the town's main street. "We moved here from just two blocks away," said Kelley Shaw, a 37-year-old speech pathologist. "Our [other] house had no driveway and we loved the porches on these old houses.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Many buyers looking for a lovely and quaint place to live in Baltimore City would probably have torn down the crumbling wreck of a house (in a perfect downtown location, however) in favor of rebuilding from the ground up. Not so with Kevin and Shelley Horten, who greet their guests at the side entrance of a completely rehabilitated, end-of-group rowhouse in Federal Hill. "When I first moved to Baltimore, I had never lived in a city," noted Kevin Horten, a 45-year-old vice president of Supplies Unlimited, a building supplier in Southwest Baltimore and an Ohio native.
NEWS
By Alan Craver and Alan Craver,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
A Pennsylvania woman has filed suit against the Columbia Inn and a Rouse company that operates it after she fell down a staircase at the hotel in October 1992.Virginia Watkins of Holmes, Pa., is seeking damages in excess of $10,000 in a suit she filed against the inn and Rouse Hotel Management in Howard Circuit Court July 8.The suit contends that the inn and the management company are negligent for not providing lighting and warning signs for a staircase that has an "unusual and unforeseeable configuration."
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | May 4, 2008
I want to create a brighter and softer look in a foyer with a stained-wood floor and staircase. It's been suggested that I carpet the stairs, but I wonder whether you can offer a less expensive alternative. I'm willing to paint and to buy a small piece of furniture. Because such a space is typically small and filled with architectural elements, there are plenty of challenges to be met.Carpeting the staircase would introduce the color and pattern that your foyer lacks. But paint and a single piece of furniture can help, too. Heather Paper's book Decorating Ideas That Work, published by Taunton Press, shows one foyer idea.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | February 10, 2008
The entrance hall in my house is small to begin with, and a staircase takes up one-third of its square footage. Can you suggest how to add some visual spark to what's now a nondescript space? I prefer traditional design, but I've got no room for an important piece of furniture. The secret to designing entrance halls, large or small, is to think not so much in terms of furniture but about color, texture and light. In a space the size of your own, that means giving emphasis to floor coverings, wallpaper and artwork.
BUSINESS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2005
YASMIN GELLER couldn't sleep until she flew her carpenters to their Illinois headquarters and back to Green Spring Valley to rework the posts that she thought marred the contemporary lines of the 23-foot spiral staircase in her new home. The maple-and-glass staircase - a showstopper - had to be just right. After all, she and her husband, Ira, planned to spend the rest of their lives in the 12,000-square-foot, multimillion-dollar abode. The house was their investment. Another baby. A jewel.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 17, 1993
Q: Because the staircase in our home is steeper and wider than average, the triangular wall along its side acts as a dominant element in the narrow entrance hall. Unfortunately, the shape of the wall is too awkward to permit use of the usual mirror-above-console-table combination.Do you have some suggestions for what to do about this wall? It's the only one in the downstairs part of the house that doesn't have some kind of opening.A: Yours is not an uncommon problem. As a result, interior designers have developed a variety of options that you may wish to consider.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 6, 2013
Midseason used to be a time for networks to put on series that weren't good enough to make the fall lineup. The thinking was: The money has been spent to make these episodes, so let's try to get something out of them by plugging them for shows that have bombed. But thanks to cable and huge changes in the way that people access and watch TV, midseason is in many ways now the best season for TV viewing. This is especially true when it comes to drama, the genre that network television has by and large abandoned to cable, PBS and now Web operations like Netflix because it has been deemed too expensive and risky for efficient (read: cheap)
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Many buyers looking for a lovely and quaint place to live in Baltimore City would probably have torn down the crumbling wreck of a house (in a perfect downtown location, however) in favor of rebuilding from the ground up. Not so with Kevin and Shelley Horten, who greet their guests at the side entrance of a completely rehabilitated, end-of-group rowhouse in Federal Hill. "When I first moved to Baltimore, I had never lived in a city," noted Kevin Horten, a 45-year-old vice president of Supplies Unlimited, a building supplier in Southwest Baltimore and an Ohio native.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard | Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2010
Two iron lamps on chunky fieldstone posts straddle the entrance to a driveway that ambles past a sprawling front lawn and ends at the side garages attached to the equally sprawling, two-story Provencal-style home of the Twigg family. The gray stucco of the exterior, with gables, second-floor dormers and four white columns supporting a large roof over the front porch, would suggest an established estate were it not for new saplings planted along the ends of the property and the construction of houses rising nearby.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
With the help of their two daughters who work for a Baltimore interior designer, Jon and Margee Zemarel have made their Roland Park house into a showcase since moving in about seven years ago. But, thanks to an abundance of trees and other greenery surrounding the four-bedroom, 31/2-bathroom Colonial house, the outside world has little chance of catching a glimpse. It's easy to drive right by. The house is nestled on a little more than a third of an acre, and the Zemarels have added many outdoor amenities that seem to blend in, such as a two-car garage that was built to match the house built in the 1920s - complete with old windows scavenged from another older building.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | May 4, 2008
I want to create a brighter and softer look in a foyer with a stained-wood floor and staircase. It's been suggested that I carpet the stairs, but I wonder whether you can offer a less expensive alternative. I'm willing to paint and to buy a small piece of furniture. Because such a space is typically small and filled with architectural elements, there are plenty of challenges to be met.Carpeting the staircase would introduce the color and pattern that your foyer lacks. But paint and a single piece of furniture can help, too. Heather Paper's book Decorating Ideas That Work, published by Taunton Press, shows one foyer idea.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun reporter | March 2, 2008
What do you do after you've married off your daughter, watched her glide down your oak-floored foyer's sweeping Gone With the Wind staircase and through the glass-paneled double doors? Well, if you're Sharon and Bob Yellon, you sell the house. No, not to pay for the wedding, but to move on to other challenges - and other homes. The Yellons built this custom, executive estate home off Falls Road in 2005. It's not the place where they raised their family, but it is the place that upped their interest in planning and designing new homes.
BUSINESS
By Ralph Bivins and Greg Hassell and Ralph Bivins and Greg Hassell,Special to The Sun | February 5, 1995
Houston -- They bring back memories of a time when people weren't too frantic to sit on a swing for a few minutes and watch day fade into night.They are a piece of Americana, conjuring up images of mom and dad and the kids lazily sitting around talking or just watching the neighbors walking by.They're front porches, and they're coming back."
BUSINESS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Contributing Writer | May 29, 1994
Until nine years ago, Carol and Jeff Sattler owned what their parents considered a part of the American Dream: a comfortable, nine-room split-level in the suburbs.But the Sattlers tossed their parents' dream away to buy their dream -- a turn-of-the-century, 15-room Queen Anne Victorian in the Hamilton section of Baltimore.Sure, they left a house with low maintenance for one that needs constant work, but they say they're happy."I like the oldness of it, the craftsmanship," says Mrs. Sattler, 40, a vice president at NationsBank.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | February 10, 2008
The entrance hall in my house is small to begin with, and a staircase takes up one-third of its square footage. Can you suggest how to add some visual spark to what's now a nondescript space? I prefer traditional design, but I've got no room for an important piece of furniture. The secret to designing entrance halls, large or small, is to think not so much in terms of furniture but about color, texture and light. In a space the size of your own, that means giving emphasis to floor coverings, wallpaper and artwork.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
When Luann Carra brings work home, she doesn't commute far. She takes a few steps from her gift shop into her kitchen. Her store, Zoe's Garden, is in what 11 years ago was the living and dining room of her Fells Point home. "I can do business stuff on the kitchen island," she said. But she also can whisk work away quickly and prepare dinner there. Or relax on the futon and watch TV. Neighborhood friends are a customer base. "People know that I live here," she said. "People will knock and I'm in my pajamas.
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