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By Dan Rodricks | January 15, 2004
ABOUT THOSE stained-glass windows in the Basilica of the Assumption, I would like to paraphrase Groucho Marx and say: "Be gone, and never darken my church again." I'm voting for transparency. Let there be light, radical light! God be praised, light! Maybe, once they remove the nine arched stained-glass windows, the cathedral won't be so funereal - even when there's a funeral. And brides are going to like the new luminescence. In case you've been stressing about more important things and haven't heard, there's a typically Smalltimore debate raging, this time over windows in - stand by for overwrought official title - the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, designed by Latrobe and dedicated in 1821.
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NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Personnel and guests at Fort Meade gathered Thursday, on the anniversary of the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil, to remember the nearly 3,000 lives lost that day - and pay tribute to 411 fallen first responders with the unveiling of a stained-glass image that includes a piece of the World Trade Center. "It has been 13 years since New York City, New Jersey, and the D.C.-area emergency responders became the stuff of legend as firefighters, police officers and paramedic EMTs followed the call of duty into the pages of history," Deputy Garrison Cmdr.
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NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 1999
ON DEC. 15, Elizabeth Fitzmaurice, Donna Darcy and Lynda Horsman opened their new stained-glass shop on U.S. 1 in the Columbia Junction shopping center. They named the shop The Glass Key, after the title of a mystery novel by Dashiell Hammett.It was a book from the library of Elizabeth's father, Peter Evanosky, who died in 1998 at age 83. Elizabeth Fitzmaurice lived with her father in Greenbelt during his last illness. That's when she took up stained glass as a hobby -- and where she read the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun and By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Doris Smithson from Greeneville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for making "Stained Glass" candy. She said she used to buy bags of this colorful homemade treat at a church bazaar in Lexington, Ky., around the Christmas holidays and that it made great stocking stuffers. Wendy Sutula from Jessup shared her family recipe for what she calls Christmas candy that is almost certainly the recipe Smithson sought. While Sutula said making the candy is a rather time-consuming process, the end result is amazing.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson | November 5, 1990
Jewel-like colors danced across the wall as the sun gave life to the intricate unicorn and carousel-horse stained-glass panels mounted next to the baby's crib."
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
The city's Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation approved plans for exterior restoration work on the national landmark Basilica of the Assumption last night, but postponed a vote on the hotly contested removal of its nine stained-glass windows sought by the Archdiocese of Baltimore. More than 40 people, with divided opinions on the windows, turned out last night for a hearing on the $32 million project by the commission, whose approval is needed for exterior changes to historic buildings.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | December 24, 2006
Usually, when artist Mark Carson visits an elementary school for one of his stained-glass workshops, the students are given free rein to create their own designs. But at Bellows Spring Elementary School in Ellicott City last week, the students all worked together to create six themed windows, which will eventually be placed in the sunlit windows by the school's front office. "It's much more ambitious than normal," said Carson, who does artist-in-residency programs in Howard and surrounding counties.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
More than 35 people, their opinions sharply divided about whether Baltimores Basilica of the Assumption should replace nine historic stained-glass windows as part of a $32 million project to restore the cathedral, turned out last night for a city hearing that was to decide the projects fate. The city's commission on historic and architectural preservation hadnt rendered a decision by late last night after hearing testimony from supporters and opponents of the restoration. Among the critics who spoke at the meeting was Stuart Seipple, a graduate student who grew up in Baltimore and comes from an eighth-generation Catholic family who attended Mass at the Basilica when he was a child.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
AS ITS members move on to middle school, the fifth-grade class at Clemens Crossing Elementary School has left behind a beautiful legacy - stained-glass windows designed by the pupils themselves. Seven stained-glass panels now frame the school's front doors. Stained-glass artist Donna Darcy worked with the children as an artist-in-residence on the project. Darcy is the owner of the Glass Key, a stained-glass supply store and studio in Jessup. Funded in part by a grant from the Howard County Arts Council, the project cost more than $7,500.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | May 27, 1993
The happiness Sharon and Rusty Rowland find in their business gives a new meaning to the phrase, "whistle while you work."But the joy they get from producing the stained-glass items for their New Windsor business is reason enough for them to exchange jokes and jibes among the rising dust and shards."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
Carole Lynn Maier, a stained-glass artist and former House of Ruth board president, died of an autoimmune lung ailment Feb. 24 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Kingsville resident was 60. Born Carole Lynn Smith in Baltimore and raised in Kingsville, she was a 1970 graduate of Perry Hall High School. At age 18, while living her grandparents, she changed her name to theirs, Maier. As a young woman, she moved to the Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood. "She loved the city," said her husband, Mark Wiesand, who sells jet fuel for corporate aviation.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
More than a few East Coast buildings contain a Tiffany stained-glass window or two. But one structure in Baltimore can boast much more - a complete interior created by the famed designer, Louis Comfort Tiffany. St. Mark's Lutheran Church on St. Paul Street is considered such an exceptional example of Tiffany's work that it has been recommended for designation as a Baltimore landmark. Only one other city building - the Senator Theatre - has an interior that was singled out for landmark status.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
In 1985, attorney David Snyder purchased one side of a duplex in Baltimore between the upscale neighborhoods of Roland Park and Guilford. The 1929 brick Georgian-style home had a stately exterior but would need an interior makeover. Nevertheless, Snyder said, the house was "very livable for a bachelor like me. " Unfortunately, it was a bachelor pad in the not-so-flattering sense of the term: He initially didn't improve the interior, which consists of two stories and an attic. The house, by Snyder's admission, fell into a state of disrepair, and he worked halfheartedly at fixing it up. But after the double snowstorms of February 2010 brought down his gutters and battered his slate roof, causing numerous leaks, Snyder seriously considered renovation.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | June 21, 2012
If Mitt Romney wins the presidential election this fall, he'll have Harry Reid partly to thank. The Republican presidential nominee and the Senate Democratic leader don't have much in common politically. But they're both members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - that is, they're both Mormons. So whenever officials of the LDS church are asked about the once-common concern that a Mormon president might take orders from Salt Lake City, they have a ready answer: Just look at Harry Reid.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | April 1, 2011
Location is by no means the only thing the Stained Glass Pub has going for it. This younger version of its Silver Spring sibling already has earned itself word-of-mouth praise and many regulars. Billed as a “family restaurant and sports bar,” this Dorsey Road eatery, which replaced Joe Theismann's in October 2008, is noted for pizza and pub grub. The ambiance is quite relaxed - lots of wood, an ample bar and nicely divided dining areas. The menu is accessible, too. All your pub favorites, many of them done up with creative touches that make the food more fun. Plus entrées that feature everything from jumbo lump crab cakes or New York strip to Mom's lasagna or Aunt Peggy's meatloaf or the popular seafood gumbo.
NEWS
November 22, 2009
The Columbia Art Center is offering "Introduction to Stained Glass" from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at 6100 Foreland Garth. Participants can learn to cut glass and copper foil, and assemble and solder a stained-glass project. Cost is $145 for residents, $155 for others. To register and for more information, call 410-730-0075 or go to columbiaartcenter.org.
NEWS
November 16, 1997
Artists do have a stake in BWI's glass crabJeffrey Koenig's viewpoint ("Artists are getting crabby about BWI's crustacean," letter, Oct. 26) is no doubt very correct.However, at the beginning of building the stained-glass crab, when the magnitude of the job sank in, we told Urgo, the ad agency that dealt with us for County Executive O. James Lighthizer and Anne Arundel County, that we would give back the deposit and forget the whole thing.They said, "No, no, we really want it."They said they wanted a "Tiffany," and they wanted it badly.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | August 3, 2009
In its long history, St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic Church in downtown Baltimore has seen its share of saints, sinners and Baltimore weather. The first two have been easier to accommodate than the third, which has taken its toll on the church. A costly renovation is under way to make amends. A few days ago, workers climbed scaffolding and removed two fragile stained-glass windows from the church's nave, a step in the restoration of the 1845 building renowned for its lavish Gothic Revival interior, high altar and no fewer than 84 saint statues.
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