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NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1997
ATHOLTON HIGH School's new drama teacher, Nathan Rosen, will make his directorial debut at the school next week with a production of Ferber and Kaufman's comedy-drama, "Stage Door."The play depicts a group of aspiring young actresses who live in a boarding house in New York City.Performances will be held at 7: 30 p.m. Nov. 20, 21 and 22 at the school, 6520 Freetown Road.Tickets are $6 each and will be sold at the door. Theatergoers are asked to bring a nonperishable food item to donate to charity.
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FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | March 19, 2005
I INHERITED my fondness for spur-of-the-moment travel from my grandfather, Edward Jacques Monaghan, who demonstrated his get-out-of-town technique when I was 4. He took me downtown on his chores, and maybe a lunch at a tavern he favored. It was a good idea to evacuate the house on Guilford Avenue, with its ever-increasing membership, as a means of preserving sanity for a part of the day. I think we were near the Shot Tower on Fayette Street when a car pulled over and the driver asked for directions to New York City.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Contributing Writer | February 26, 1993
The ringing of hammers, smell of fresh paint, last-minute lighting cues and actors prowling the set looking for their marks.It's all part of what looks to an outsider like a run for the lifeboats on the Titanic, but actually is a dress rehearsal for Stone Road Productions' latest play, "Rumors."The play opens tomorrow evening at the Stage Door Dinner Theatre, at Wilhelm Limited Caterers, formerly Friendly Farm restaurant, on Route 140, Westminster.This fast-paced Neil Simon comedy unites some very objectionable friends at a 10th wedding anniversary party, where the host and hostess, Charley and Myra Brock, never appear.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 7, 2001
John Waters was the first to notice - the fat girls dressed in bright colors and displayed a lot of cleavage. The skinny girls wore black. Normally, he pointed out, large women try to disguise their size by wearing dark colors. But yesterday was a day when fat was fine, and thin was in - especially if you could sing. It was the day the Hairspray auditions came to Baltimore. The coming Broadway musical, based on Waters' 1988 movie of the same name, held its first ever open-call auditions at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | January 8, 1992
There's something new cooking at the Friendly Farm Restaurant.And Carroll will get its first taste March 6, when "Oklahoma" opens at the Stage Door Dinner Theatre.Larry Wilhelm, general manager of Friendly Farm and recipient of the 1990 Maryland Restaurateur of the Year award, is excited about the new venture and his new partnership with Stone Road Productions.Stone Road has been doing excellent theater for the last 2 1/2 yearsin Taneytown at the Havilah-Hayes Dinner Theatre. The move to Friendly Farm will result in a larger and more practical performance space,as well as the proximity to a potentially larger audience.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | October 11, 1993
The curtain won't rise on "Harvey" this fall. Without a stage, the show can't go on."Everybody is moaning, but we haven't been able to find a place," said Paula Langmead, business manager of Stage Door Dinner Theater.The displaced company had cast "Harvey" for its fall production at Wilhelm Caterers on Route 140 in Westminster.Three performances of the comedy, set to run weekends through October, were already sold out."A man came up to me at my son's football game and told me he wanted 150 tickets," said Joan Crooks, a member of the company.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | November 27, 1991
Is there any reason why "A Chorus Line" won't still be playing somewhere in the world in the 21st century? Having set a record as the longest running Broadway show with its amazing New York run from 1975 to 1990, this landmark musical is still generating globe-trotting touring productions.The company that opened at a nearly full Lyric Opera House last night marks the fifth time this self-described "singular sensation" of a musical has played Baltimore. Directed and choreographed for this tour by Baayork Lee, who originated the role of Connie on Broadway, the latest edition of the Michael Bennett-conceived show features a number of performers who are themselves "Chorus Line" veterans.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 11, 1993
For an occasional dollar, Ronnie Smuck has played booking agent for dancers on The Block. From force of habit, he sometimes calls them girls. For this, he now pays a legal price which defies reason.Go back to last December. A woman who works on The Block asks Smuck for a loan to help pay her rent and buy Christmas gifts. Smuck helps out, but says he needs the money back after the holidays.On Jan. 9, he goes to The Stage Door, just off The Block, to ask about repayment. But he gets into an argument with the bar manager, Tony Pulaski, and the two decide, in the time-honored and primitive way, to settle the argument outside, with fists.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Michael James and Joan Jacobson and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1995
Forget pasties and G-strings. If Baltimore really wants to keep up with "a phenomenon around the country" it needs legalized nude dancing, a former gubernatorial candidate turned lobbyist is telling city officialdom.Former state Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski, a lobbyist for an Atlanta strip club interested in expanding here and cultivating the tourist trade, has asked the city liquor board to allow nude dancing in Baltimore.The proposal has excited business owners on The Block who say the measure might be the last hope for resurrecting the declining red-light strip.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | March 19, 2005
I INHERITED my fondness for spur-of-the-moment travel from my grandfather, Edward Jacques Monaghan, who demonstrated his get-out-of-town technique when I was 4. He took me downtown on his chores, and maybe a lunch at a tavern he favored. It was a good idea to evacuate the house on Guilford Avenue, with its ever-increasing membership, as a means of preserving sanity for a part of the day. I think we were near the Shot Tower on Fayette Street when a car pulled over and the driver asked for directions to New York City.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Peter Hermann and John Rivera and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2000
Like many before him, Jack Graham was arrested recently for his behavior on The Block, Baltimore's red-light district. His crime? Handing out tracts to passers-by, inviting them to give their lives to Jesus Christ. Graham is a York, Pa., pastor who has been coming to town each Friday night for 13 years to save souls at the corner of Baltimore and Holliday streets. He was arrested last month and charged with loitering for handing out religious tracts. Undeterred, he's still coming back.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1997
ATHOLTON HIGH School's new drama teacher, Nathan Rosen, will make his directorial debut at the school next week with a production of Ferber and Kaufman's comedy-drama, "Stage Door."The play depicts a group of aspiring young actresses who live in a boarding house in New York City.Performances will be held at 7: 30 p.m. Nov. 20, 21 and 22 at the school, 6520 Freetown Road.Tickets are $6 each and will be sold at the door. Theatergoers are asked to bring a nonperishable food item to donate to charity.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Michael James and Joan Jacobson and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1995
Forget pasties and G-strings. If Baltimore really wants to keep up with "a phenomenon around the country" it needs legalized nude dancing, a former gubernatorial candidate turned lobbyist is telling city officialdom.Former state Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski, a lobbyist for an Atlanta strip club interested in expanding here and cultivating the tourist trade, has asked the city liquor board to allow nude dancing in Baltimore.The proposal has excited business owners on The Block who say the measure might be the last hope for resurrecting the declining red-light strip.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | October 11, 1993
The curtain won't rise on "Harvey" this fall. Without a stage, the show can't go on."Everybody is moaning, but we haven't been able to find a place," said Paula Langmead, business manager of Stage Door Dinner Theater.The displaced company had cast "Harvey" for its fall production at Wilhelm Caterers on Route 140 in Westminster.Three performances of the comedy, set to run weekends through October, were already sold out."A man came up to me at my son's football game and told me he wanted 150 tickets," said Joan Crooks, a member of the company.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 11, 1993
For an occasional dollar, Ronnie Smuck has played booking agent for dancers on The Block. From force of habit, he sometimes calls them girls. For this, he now pays a legal price which defies reason.Go back to last December. A woman who works on The Block asks Smuck for a loan to help pay her rent and buy Christmas gifts. Smuck helps out, but says he needs the money back after the holidays.On Jan. 9, he goes to The Stage Door, just off The Block, to ask about repayment. But he gets into an argument with the bar manager, Tony Pulaski, and the two decide, in the time-honored and primitive way, to settle the argument outside, with fists.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Contributing Writer | February 26, 1993
The ringing of hammers, smell of fresh paint, last-minute lighting cues and actors prowling the set looking for their marks.It's all part of what looks to an outsider like a run for the lifeboats on the Titanic, but actually is a dress rehearsal for Stone Road Productions' latest play, "Rumors."The play opens tomorrow evening at the Stage Door Dinner Theatre, at Wilhelm Limited Caterers, formerly Friendly Farm restaurant, on Route 140, Westminster.This fast-paced Neil Simon comedy unites some very objectionable friends at a 10th wedding anniversary party, where the host and hostess, Charley and Myra Brock, never appear.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Peter Hermann and John Rivera and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2000
Like many before him, Jack Graham was arrested recently for his behavior on The Block, Baltimore's red-light district. His crime? Handing out tracts to passers-by, inviting them to give their lives to Jesus Christ. Graham is a York, Pa., pastor who has been coming to town each Friday night for 13 years to save souls at the corner of Baltimore and Holliday streets. He was arrested last month and charged with loitering for handing out religious tracts. Undeterred, he's still coming back.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 7, 2001
John Waters was the first to notice - the fat girls dressed in bright colors and displayed a lot of cleavage. The skinny girls wore black. Normally, he pointed out, large women try to disguise their size by wearing dark colors. But yesterday was a day when fat was fine, and thin was in - especially if you could sing. It was the day the Hairspray auditions came to Baltimore. The coming Broadway musical, based on Waters' 1988 movie of the same name, held its first ever open-call auditions at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt | May 27, 1992
For a brief shining moment last week, I was the mother of a star. Well, perhaps "star" is not quite accurate; maybe "extra" is more appropriate. Anyway, for one day, my son Travis was invited to participate in a Japanese television project taped around Baltimore about the life of baseball legend Babe Ruth.It all began with a casting story that rivals Lana Turner's discovery at Schwabb's drugstore. Our neighbor, Thomas "T.J." Goldberg, 10, was playing baseball one afternoon at Point Pleasant Elementary School when casting agent Charles Domm noticed his resemblance to a young Babe Ruth.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | January 8, 1992
There's something new cooking at the Friendly Farm Restaurant.And Carroll will get its first taste March 6, when "Oklahoma" opens at the Stage Door Dinner Theatre.Larry Wilhelm, general manager of Friendly Farm and recipient of the 1990 Maryland Restaurateur of the Year award, is excited about the new venture and his new partnership with Stone Road Productions.Stone Road has been doing excellent theater for the last 2 1/2 yearsin Taneytown at the Havilah-Hayes Dinner Theatre. The move to Friendly Farm will result in a larger and more practical performance space,as well as the proximity to a potentially larger audience.
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