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July 8, 2010
Stage 4 A 95.4-mile ride from Cambrai to the champagne capital Reims. Winner: Alessandro Petacchi of Italy. The Lampre rider collected his second stage victory of this Tour. Yellow Jersey: Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland, who finished in the main pack with the expected title contenders. Defending champion Alberto Contador of Spain is ninth, 1:40 behind. Next stage: Thursday's fifth stage also is mostly flat, a 116.5-mile run from Epernay to Montargis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Judging by the spicy, sophisticated production of David Ives' “Venus in Fur," it's going to be an interesting year for the Columbia-based professional company Rep Stage, now in its first full season planned by recently appointed co-producing artistic directors Suzanne Beal and Joseph W. Ritsch. "Venus in Fur," a hit on Broadway in 2011, manages a neat little trick of turning tables and shifting centers of gravity as it confronts issues of desire, passion, sexuality and domination.
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NEWS
November 22, 2009
Laurel Mill Playhouse presents a play based on the children's novel by E.B. White about a pig named Wilbur who is saved from being slaughtered by an intelligent spider. The show starts at 2 p.m. today at 508 Main St. Tickets are $13, $10 for students 18 and younger and seniors 65 and older. Call 301-617-9906 or go to laurelmillplayhouse.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
It is impossible to avoid thinking about Sarah Kane's suicide by hanging in 1999 at the age of 28 when encountering the British playwright's final work, "4.48 Psychosis. " There's something at once real and surreal, disturbing and absorbing, about this roughly hour-long examination of mental illness, qualities that Iron Crow Theatre seizes upon in a darkly evocative production directed by Ryan Clark at Theatre Project. Kane's non-linear play is a kind of manic prose poem about people in various stages of mental illness; warnings and pleas seem to haunt every line.
NEWS
By David Berry | March 5, 2010
T he German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer once said that all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. Schopenhauer's views could be applied to almost any issue that is currently being debated, but it seems one of the most useful times is during discussions of any environmental problem. Just listen to conversations about global warming. The truth behind Schopenhauer's model was brought home on a local level during a recent presentation to a group about the problems of silt behind the Conowingo Dam. One man in the back of the room was quietly polite but obviously anxious to say something.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
The Parkville High School Knight Players, under the co-direction of Steve Devorah and Lisa Moose, will host its final performance of this year's dramatic production, "A Midsummer Night's Jersey. " on Saturday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m., at the school, 2600 Putty Hill Avenue in Parkville. Written by Ken Ludwig for high school actors, the play blends Shakespeare's “A Midsummer Night's Dream” with reality TV's “Jersey Shore.” Tickets are available at the door of the school.
FEATURES
September 19, 2005
How the stage world is portrayed on screen is the theme of Towson University's "Theater and/As Film" series, running Monday nights through Dec. 5. Tonight's offering is last year's Stage Beauty, starring Billy Crudup as Edward "Ned" Kynaston, a 1660s actor known for his skill in playing women's roles. When Charles II suddenly allows women to play these roles, Kynaston's life turns upside-down. Claire Danes also stars. The film screens at 7:30 tonight at Towson University's Van Bokkelen Hall, 8000 York Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 19, 1996
The film version of Herb Gardner's Tony Award-winning play, jTC "I'm Not Rappaport," will open in Baltimore in early 1997, but if you want to see what the original stage version is like, the Jewish Community Center's Ensemble Theatre Company has a production opening tonight.Barney Cohen and Ed Smith star as two elderly curmudgeons in this touching tale of friendship. Direction is by Mitchell A. Nathan.Show times at the Jewish Community Center, 5700 Park Heights Ave., are 7: 30 p.m. Thursdays, 8 p.m. Saturdays and 1 p.m. Sundays, through Dec. 29. Tickets are $6 in advance; $8 at the door.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
After winning five Washington Area Theatre Community Honors awards and a Ruby Griffith Award for production excellence last season, the 2nd Star theater troupe is opening its 20th season with a production of Stephen Schwartz's biblical musical "Children of Eden. " Although its January 1991 London premiere received mixed reviews and closed after three months, "Children of Eden," with book and libretto by John Caird, has become such a popular offering in community theater circles that its initial struggles are a faded memory.
NEWS
Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
T hinking of selling your home? Consider this: According to the National Association of Realtors, 92 percent of buyers use the Internet to search for homes. And that consummate time-saver for prospective buyers can also make or break a seller's chances of getting the asking price. Your home's initial appeal online determines its ability to compete with thousands of other offerings. Enter the home stager. Howard County real estate agents and buyers have been calling on their services for years.
SPORTS
Brittany Cheng and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Donnell Whittenburg rocked back and forth on his feet, his eyes boring into the vault table yards ahead of him as he waited behind the start line. It was Aug. 24, Day 2 of the 2014 P&G Gymnastics Championships at Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, and the 20-year-old U.S. men's national team member was playing catch-up after finishing sixth two nights earlier. So Whittenburg, a Baltimore native who will be competing in the world championships starting Friday in Nanning, China, knew he had to nail a rare vault sequence - so dangerous that it was once thought to be impossible - if he wanted to medal.
NEWS
By Tim Kreider | September 19, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated to reflect the correct spelling of Billie Holiday's name. The Sun regrets the error.  I traveled back to my hometown of Baltimore last weekend to reprise my role as that important historical figure, The Devil, in a rock opera about the Battle of Baltimore. This was the long-anticipated bicentennial performance of "1814!: The War of 1812 Rock Opera," a project some old friends of mine, Dave Israel and David Dudley, conceived in the bars of Fort Avenue back in 1992, before we had anything worse to do. They'd always envisioned mounting a spectacular, all-star production of the thing on the 200th anniversary of the bombardment of Fort McHenry, in the unimaginable science-fiction year of 2014.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Vivienne Shub, who played eccentric personalities as she delighted Baltimore theater audiences during a long and lauded run here, died of heart failure Thursday morning at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former Liberty Heights resident was 95. "Vivienne was one of the most talented actresses on the Baltimore scene," said Rhea Feiken, the television personality who performed with her. "You learned a lesson every time you watched her. Her dedication to the theater was enormous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
In a letter to his father, a 25-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart declared: "I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. … I simply follow my own feelings. " This self-confidence is just one of the revered composer's traits explored in Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus," which Center Stage is reviving for its season-opener. A few other Mozart characteristics, including behavior still not considered kosher in polite society, also pepper this colorful mix of fact and fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Big-bucks movies -- "Sister Act," "Ghost," "Flashdance," "Dirty Dancing," to name a few -- get turned into stage musicals with some frequency. Indie films form a smaller screen-to-boards subset. Of these, "Once," based on the minuscule-budget, shot-in-17-days Irish film written and directed by John Carney, may be the most distinctive. With its eight Tony Awards in 2012, including best music, "Once" continues to win fans and strong reviews on the road. The national touring production, which arrives Tuesday to open the Hippodrome Theatre 's Broadway Across America season, launched a year ago and will keep traveling at least through next summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
  Poor Harry. The struggling actor lucked out auditioning for an understudy gig, but he has little respect for the guy he's understudying -- Jake, a so-so star of low-grade disaster movies. To make things more uncomfortable, the stage manager running the rehearsal turns out to be Harry's former fiancee, Roxanne, and she is far from pleased at the reunion. Still, Harry is determined to plunge into the play, a long-buried work by Franz Kafka filled with challenging existential musings and surreal situations.
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