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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | December 15, 1993
Teachers could be spending more time on the other side of the desk if a new staff development plan is approved by the school board in the 1994-1995 budget proposal.When administrators present the operating budget proposal to the board Jan. 12, it will include a request to spend $371,639 next year on training teachers to better instruct students."Staff development is not about staff -- the ultimate reason of staff development is what happens to youngsters," said Gary Dunkleberger, director of curriculum and staff development.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 7, 2013
Harford County Public Schools officials have taken two days in April scheduled for faculty professional development and converted them to regular school days to make up for earlier closings because inclement weather. April 29 and April 30 had been designated on the 2012-2013 school calendar for Teacher Staff Development, according to the HCPS website, and they were also set aside as make-up days for inclement weather if needed. Eight days in the spring were set aside as make-up days if schools closed for bad weather, and five have been used, with the most recent closing taking place Wednesday in anticipation of snow that never actually arrived in any magnitude.
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NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
If the Howard County school system is to remain at the top, it must do more to help teachers and administrators develop professionally, according to staff development coordinator Sandra Erickson.Ms. Erickson will be presenting a report on the future and direction of staff development to Board of Education members at tonight's meeting."We're in a time of great change," Ms. Erickson said. "There are a tremendous amount of new initiatives and new requirements. Staff development is crucial to these changes."
NEWS
December 25, 2005
Credit union grant benefits CCC students First Financial of Maryland Federal Credit Union recently awarded a $45,000 grant to benefit Carroll Community College students. The grant is the third made by the credit union to the college in the past 10 years. The grants total $100,000. Carroll Community College Foundation Inc. will use the grant to support two full, need-based scholarships for the next five years for students pursuing associate arts of teaching degrees; for continued support of the First Financial Federal Credit Union Child Care Fee Assistance Fund; and for the First Financial Federal Credit Union Equipment Fund to provide annual grants to purchase equipment and education materials for the Child Development Center.
NEWS
December 25, 2005
Credit union grant benefits CCC students First Financial of Maryland Federal Credit Union recently awarded a $45,000 grant to benefit Carroll Community College students. The grant is the third made by the credit union to the college in the past 10 years. The grants total $100,000. Carroll Community College Foundation Inc. will use the grant to support two full, need-based scholarships for the next five years for students pursuing associate arts of teaching degrees; for continued support of the First Financial Federal Credit Union Child Care Fee Assistance Fund; and for the First Financial Federal Credit Union Equipment Fund to provide annual grants to purchase equipment and education materials for the Child Development Center.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
The Carroll school board approved a 1997-1998 school calendar yesterday that includes a series of late starts and early dismissals to give teachers more time to talk with parents, participate in staff development and get planning and paperwork done.The calendar also has five snow days built into it, and any unused days would be added to spring vacation.The late starts and early dismissals address a long-standing problem for teachers, especially in elementary schools, who have asked for more time for their professional tasks.
NEWS
January 28, 1991
The president of St. John's College in Annapolis, Donald J. MacIver Jr., recently announced that the college has been selected to participate in the Sears-Roebuck Foundation's 1990-1991 Teaching Excellence and Campus Leasdership Award Program.The awards are presented to top educators at nearly 700 of the nation's leading independent liberal arts colleges and universities as a means of recognizing their outstanding resourcefulness and leadership.Each winning faculty member receives $1,000, and the institution receives a grant ranging from $500 to $1,500, depending on student enrollment.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
About 70 school administrators and supervisors participated in an annual two-day retreat last week at Wakefield Valley Conference Center in Westminster.This year, the retreat focused on the outcomes-based approach to education and on work that needs to be done to identify an "essential curriculum" that should be offered to all students, as well as an extended curriculum for specialized areas such as calculus or auto mechanics.The retreat's focus varies from year to year, but always deals with school improvement, said Gary Dunkleberger, director of staff development and curriculum for Carroll County schools.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
At a time of growing clamor to better prepare teachers and root out incompetence among them, Baltimore's school district provides virtually no training and consistently protects the jobs of bad teachers, a school watchdog group said yesterday.Despite years of dismal test scores, attendance and dropout rates, the report notes, almost every teacher in the district continually receives good or excellent evaluations.In a 60-page report, an affiliate of the nonprofit Advocates for Children and Youth calls for an immediate overhaul of what it portrays as an irrelevant, fragmented and inconsistent training and evaluation system.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
The one-size-fits-all teacher workshop is about to become a misfit in Maryland.Putting another piece of school reform in place, the State Board of Education yesterday endorsed a plan to make professional development for Maryland's 45,000 teachers substantive, meaningful and tailored to the specific needs of those teachers, their students and schools.The plan would shift attention from general topics such as multiculturalism, and toward courses more closely linked to classroom work. But, for the precedent-setting plan to work, Maryland school systems probably will have to change the way they use two precious commodities: time and money.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
As Anne Arundel County teachers begin to rate the performance of Superintendent Eric J. Smith, the school system has released suggestions to ease teacher workload and to study the disparity in their salaries compared to neighboring districts. "Our lifeblood is the quality of our teaching staff," Smith said. He emphasized the need to retain current staff and recruit good candidates to replace those retiring or leaving the system. "We have a very, very strong group of educators in our classrooms, but we also have a very experienced, very seasoned group of educators in our classrooms," Smith said.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. reported yesterday a first-quarter loss that was much larger than expected, but attributed the additional red ink to investments in new products and a larger sales force. The Baltimore drugmaker reported a net loss of $18.1 million, or 53 cents a share, for the three months that ended March 31. Analysts had anticipated a net loss of 39 cents, according to a survey conducted by Zacks Investment Research. Guilford lost $11.2 million, or 37 cents per share, in the first quarter last year.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
After a heated discussion that lasted more than an hour, the Howard County Board of Education put off a decision last night on whether to extend the school day, a move necessary to meet state instruction requirements. An analysis by The Sun in December showed that Howard County routinely falls short of the 1,170 instructional hours required at the high school level -- this year by 42 hours. Staff and board members have been scrambling ever since to find the best way to comply with the law while creating the least educational disruption.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2003
MARYLAND'S nationally acclaimed Smart Growth program, the state's major strategy for reining in sprawl development, has lost its momentum in the first six months of the Ehrlich administration. The Governor's Office of Smart Growth, which oversees and promotes anti-sprawl strategies throughout state government, has received "no direction at all" for months, according to John Frece, its acting director. "Absolute silence; ... we've heard nothing at all since the election," says Dru Schmidt-Perkins, director of 1000 Friends of Maryland, a statewide nonprofit organization dedicated to Smart Growth.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
After meeting for two hours yesterday with the task force appointed to suggest ways to improve working conditions for Carroll County public school teachers, Superintendent Charles I. Ecker said yesterday evening that he likely will be able to address teachers' concerns and end a nearly three-month work-to-rule job action occurring at a third of the county's schools. "I think most teachers want to try to resolve this," Ecker said in an interview after yesterday's closed meeting. "They have some legitimate concerns and I'm going to try to address them."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
After meeting for two hours yesterday with the task force appointed to suggest ways to improve working conditions for Carroll County public school teachers, Superintendent Charles I. Ecker said yesterday evening that he likely will be able to address teachers' concerns and end a nearly three-month work-to-rule job action occurring at a third of the county's schools. "I think most teachers want to try to resolve this," Ecker said in an interview after yesterday's closed meeting. "They have some legitimate concerns and I'm going to try to address them."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
The Howard County school board will decide what to keep in and cut out of next year's operating budget at its meeting today."It would be nice to find money for all of the programs the community and the school system needs," said board member Linda Johnston. "Unfortunately, we don't have the money to do it. It's not an easy time to be a board member."Superintendent Michael E. Hickey's $202 million proposal is a hold-the-line budget that includes no money for new programs, save a $100,000 expansion of the human relations department.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
The Board of Education is not a "bloated bureaucracy," but it could use some direction, according to a report issued yesterday by a citizens advisory committee."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
After meeting for two hours yesterday with the task force appointed to suggest ways to improve working conditions for Carroll County public school teachers, Superintendent Charles I. Ecker said yesterday evening that he likely will be able to address teachers' concerns and end a nearly three-month work-to-rule job action occurring at a third of the county's schools. "I think most teachers want to try to resolve this," Ecker said in an interview after yesterday's closed meeting. "They have some legitimate concerns and I'm going to try to address them."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
When Edward Cozzolino became principal of Middlesex Elementary in 1993, the school's test scores were among the worst in Baltimore County. When he left in 1997, Middlesex was a National Blue Ribbon School. When Cozzolino arrived to take over nearby Shady Spring Elementary in Rosedale in 1999, the school was struggling academically and with behavior problems. Troublemakers often were lined up outside the office, and pupils routinely banged their fists against the partitions that serve as classroom walls.
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