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Stadium Seating

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NEWS
By DAN MORSE and DAN MORSE,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
Promising unobstructed tiers of seats like those at Camden Yards, United Artists cinemas has upgraded its plans for a 14-theater project in east Columbia -- and now intends to build the largest "stadium-seating" complex in the state.The steep rows allow moviegoers to sit 14 to 18 inches higher than those in front of them. They are popping up in new theaters throughout the nation. But only one other movie theater in Maryland has them now, according to industry officials.Completion of the Columbia project is still as much as a year away.
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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | December 23, 2007
In terms of sheer size and number of screens, Baltimore's movie theaters may never compare with the huge, anonymous multiplexes of the suburbs. But the city's theaters are known for their character, intimacy and smart film offerings. The decor is clean but looks old and tired. But though it was built more than 65 years ago, the Senator is still one of the city's cinematic gems. From the paintings on display in the lobby to the sidewalk -- Baltimore's version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame -- you won't find that anywhere else.
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
Movies are going to a new level in Anne Arundel County thanks to a multimillion-dollar movie theater complex opening tomorrow near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Hoyts West Nursery Cinema 14, just off Nursery Road at International Drive in Linthicum, is the latest theater in the Baltimore region to offer more than a dozen screens with stadium seating -- rows of seats arranged on an increasingly steeper incline to give every viewer a clear sight line.Similar theaters, such as Loews White Marsh Theatres, have been well received by moviegoers, who have consistently packed the huge auditoriums.
NEWS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Stocks? Forget 'em. Bonds? Returns too low. Permanent seat licenses? Now you're talking. The licenses that the Ravens and some other National Football League teams require fans to purchase to buy season tickets - often to help pay for stadium construction or renovation - have gone from being what many regarded as an extortionary annoyance to what some now consider a dandy investment. For instance, when the Ravens' stadium opened in 1998, a permanent seat license ranged from $250 to $3,000, depending on the location of the seat covered by the license.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF Sun staff researcher Jean Packard contributed to this article | February 16, 1998
As the crowd streamed past them yesterday afternoon, Susan and Jim Boro peered at the giant marquee. They had come to the Loews White Marsh Theatres to see -- what else? -- "Titanic."They had a lot of choices to make. The three-hours-plus blockbuster is playing on three of the 16 screens at the Baltimore area's biggest and newest theater, and there were nine showings of the film yesterday.But choice wasn't the main attraction that lured the couple from Lutherville. Instead, they drove past several theaters closer to home to get to White Marsh because of the seating.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1997
Lights, camera, stadium seating.A state-of-the-art, 14-screen theater complex proposed for Snowden Square retail center in east Columbia has cleared another regulatory hurdle -- this time receiving land-use approval for an additional parcel behind the Hechinger outlet.United Artists hopes to open the complex by Thanksgiving. Each theater will have have stadium seating -- seats in steep rows that allow moviegoers to sit 14 to 18 inches higher than those in front of them.Apparently only one such theater exists in Maryland -- at Eastpoint Mall in Baltimore County -- although they are being built in such cities as Los Angeles, Dallas, Denver and Atlanta, according to industry officials.
NEWS
December 26, 1997
BALTIMORE AREA film buffs will have to get used to the word "megaplex." The Christmas Day opening of the 16-screen Loew's Theatres in White Marsh gave the region its third film-entertainment venue that fits that category.Some theater operators rigidly define megaplexes as places with at least 16 screens. Of course, that's semantic nonsense. When you get beyond eight or nine screens in a movie house -- in some U.S. communities there are as many as 30 screens at one location -- you're talking mega.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1997
This weekend's opening of a 14-screen, all-stadium seating movie theater at Columbia's Snowden Square Shopping Center marked a major step in the megaplexing of the area's film experience."
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | December 23, 2007
In terms of sheer size and number of screens, Baltimore's movie theaters may never compare with the huge, anonymous multiplexes of the suburbs. But the city's theaters are known for their character, intimacy and smart film offerings. The decor is clean but looks old and tired. But though it was built more than 65 years ago, the Senator is still one of the city's cinematic gems. From the paintings on display in the lobby to the sidewalk -- Baltimore's version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame -- you won't find that anywhere else.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
Stadium seating may be all the rage in movie theatres, but Howard County officials are hoping to help disabled citizens by eliminating that feature in the government's premier meeting and ceremonial room - the County Council's chambers in Ellicott City. The 26 year-old Banneker Room, named after the Colonial-era, self-taught inventor and astronomer Benjamin Banneker, has a dramatic appearance. Its 365 seats are arranged somewhat like a theater in the round, with terraced seating descending to a central well where citizens testify and awards are handed out. The five council members sit at a dais at the room's far end. But the room in the county's George Howard Building is not friendly to disabled people, who must either testify from the back or make their way around the room's outer rim, dodging electric cables and public television cameras.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 9, 2004
LIKE MOST fans of the Baltimore Ravens, their 27-24 loss to Kansas City Chiefs Monday night at M&T Bank Stadium left me in pain. It is a pretty safe bet, I think, that my pain was worse than most. I took a header for the team. In the high-fiving celebration in the stands after a touchdown by Raven scatback B.J. Sams, a big guy in the row behind me lost his balance and went airborne. I never got the fellow's name, but I will call him "Tim" as in " Timmmmber." Tim knocked me off my feet and propelled me down a row, into a woman wearing a Todd Heap jersey.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | August 24, 2003
When guests arrive at Sherry Wolf and Alan Geringer's house in Owings Mills, they often express surprise at an interior design that's dramatically at odds with the staid brick facade. Beyond the front door's vestibule, in fact, the living room ceiling shoots upward to twenty feet, and a wall of windows frames an Arcadian view of woods sloping down to a gentle curve in the Jones Falls. Not that people tend to linger at this scenic outlook. No, indeed. Most visitors rush straight to the basement where this 8,000 square foot, four-bedroom home's main attraction is located.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
After spending nearly a half-million dollars to raise and level the floor in the Howard County Council chamber and thus lower the high, intimidating dais the five members sat behind, the council is spending a bit more - to jack the dais up again. It seems that eliminating the old chamber's tiered, stadium seating - long a goal of advocates for the handicapped - made the room so level that the council members couldn't be seen from much of the public seating, and vice versa. "When we're there, I'd like to see who is in the audience," said Councilman Christopher J. Merdon, an Ellicott City Republican who, like the other members, found the renovated chamber a bit too level.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
After spending nearly a half-million dollars to raise and level the floor in the Howard County Council chamber and thus lower the high, intimidating dais the five members sat behind, the council is spending a bit more -- to jack the dais up again. It seems that eliminating the old chamber's tiered, stadium seating -- long a goal of advocates for the handicapped -- made the room so level that the council members couldn't be seen from much of the public seating, and vice versa. "When we're there, I'd like to see who is in the audience," said Councilman Christopher J. Merdon, an Ellicott City Republican who, like the other members, found the renovated chamber a bit too level.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
Stadium seating may be all the rage in movie theatres, but Howard County officials are hoping to help disabled citizens by eliminating that feature in the government's premier meeting and ceremonial room - the County Council's chambers in Ellicott City. The 26 year-old Banneker Room, named after the Colonial-era, self-taught inventor and astronomer Benjamin Banneker, has a dramatic appearance. Its 365 seats are arranged somewhat like a theater in the round, with terraced seating descending to a central well where citizens testify and awards are handed out. The five council members sit at a dais at the room's far end. But the room in the county's George Howard Building is not friendly to disabled people, who must either testify from the back or make their way around the room's outer rim, dodging electric cables and public television cameras.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Magic Johnson Theatres will build a 16-screen, stadium-style movie megaplex as an anchor of the planned Capital Centre entertainment and retail complex on the site of US Airways Arena in Landover, the project's developers plan to announce today.Loews Cineplex Entertainment and Johnson Development Corp. formed the chain three years ago to bring upscale, first-run cinemas to minority neighborhoods in metropolitan areas, said a spokeswoman for Magic Johnson Theatres. The chain runs similar theaters in Los Angeles, Atlanta and Houston and plans to open three more next year in Cleveland, Harlem, N.Y., and Carson, Calif.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
A regional cinema chain that operates the sprawling Eastpoint Movies 10 complex says it plans to build Maryland's largest movie house -- a 20-screen theater in the fast-growing Owings Mills area of northwest Baltimore County.The $15 million, 85,000-square-foot project, tentatively dubbed the Movies at Red Run, would provide wide screens and "stadium" seating for movie lovers, and a play center with activities for children and adults, R/C Theatres President Scott R. Cohen said yesterday.But the project, which could draw up to 6,000 patrons at a time, may encounter opposition from residents concerned about traffic on nearby roads.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
After spending nearly a half-million dollars to raise and level the floor in the Howard County Council chamber and thus lower the high, intimidating dais the five members sat behind, the council is spending a bit more - to jack the dais up again. It seems that eliminating the old chamber's tiered, stadium seating - long a goal of advocates for the handicapped - made the room so level that the council members couldn't be seen from much of the public seating, and vice versa. "When we're there, I'd like to see who is in the audience," said Councilman Christopher J. Merdon, an Ellicott City Republican who, like the other members, found the renovated chamber a bit too level.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
The renovation at the Charles Theatre is right on schedule, says the venerable theater's co-owner John Standiford. The steel base for the new stadium seating went in last week, and Standiford says an opening date for the three new theaters should be nailed down soon.Standiford is especially excited about the theater's new concession stand, which was designed by Maryland Institute, College of Art graduate Jon Maxwell."It's really going to be nice," Standiford says. "The top is going to be concrete, and he's casting metal for the front and doing a cherry section for the bar, where we'll serve coffee and beer and wine."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
Movies are going to a new level in Anne Arundel County thanks to a multimillion-dollar movie theater complex opening tomorrow near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Hoyts West Nursery Cinema 14, just off Nursery Road at International Drive in Linthicum, is the latest theater in the Baltimore region to offer more than a dozen screens with stadium seating -- rows of seats arranged on an increasingly steeper incline to give every viewer a clear sight line.Similar theaters, such as Loews White Marsh Theatres, have been well received by moviegoers, who have consistently packed the huge auditoriums.
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