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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 11, 1992
Washington-- A good mystery-thriller needs two basic components. It should fool you (that's the mystery part), and it should scare you (that's the thriller part). In addition, if it's a stage play, it needs one thing more -- spine-tingling acting.Rupert Holmes' "Solitary Confinement," at the Kennedy Center on an extended pre-Broadway tour, isn't particularly frightening; there are more thrills and chills in Washington rush-hour traffic. But the play does have a humdinger of a twist. And best of all, it has a virtuoso performance by Stacy Keach as an eccentric, reclusive tycoon named Richard Jannings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2008
theater 'Frost/Nixon': Stacy Keach - yep, old Mike Hammer himself - makes the first of two appearances in Washington this season. This month, he portrays the disgraced former U.S. president as he engages in a battle of wits with an improbable opponent, jet-setting talk show host David Frost, in Frost/Nixon. The play runs through Nov. 30 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F St. N.W., Washington. Showtimes vary. Tickets cost $25-$80. Call 202-416-8448 or go to kennedy-center.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 24, 1990
The Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger's "Richard III" is an odd blend of blood bath and British music hall.The music hall element derives from Stacy Keach's fascinating but highly idiosyncratic performance in the title role. Delivering his soliloquies almost like stand-up comedy routines, Mr. Keach portrays Richard as if he were the comic narrator of his own tragic story.Denied many of life's pleasures because of his physical deformities, he takes pleasure in villainy instead. Conquest -- whether of women or thethrone -- is sport to him, and he exults in letting the audience in on each upcoming move.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HARTFORD COURANT | November 21, 2004
Call it the ultimate in underground humor. For a book published earlier this year, television personality Larry King posed an unusual question to well-known public figures and celebrities: "How would you like to be remembered after your death?" More than 300 people responded to his query, providing King with the material for Remember Me When I'm Gone: The Rich and Famous Write Their Own Epitaphs and Obituaries. Last words range from actor Stacy Keach's lighthearted verse, "Here lies Stacy Keach/A Georgia peach/Lived at the beach/Now out of reach," to comedian Howie Mandell's last laugh, "Is It Me or Is it Dark In Here?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By HARTFORD COURANT | November 21, 2004
Call it the ultimate in underground humor. For a book published earlier this year, television personality Larry King posed an unusual question to well-known public figures and celebrities: "How would you like to be remembered after your death?" More than 300 people responded to his query, providing King with the material for Remember Me When I'm Gone: The Rich and Famous Write Their Own Epitaphs and Obituaries. Last words range from actor Stacy Keach's lighthearted verse, "Here lies Stacy Keach/A Georgia peach/Lived at the beach/Now out of reach," to comedian Howie Mandell's last laugh, "Is It Me or Is it Dark In Here?"
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 19, 1995
Evil is at the bloody heart of Shakespeare's great tragedy, "Macbeth," and the central scenic image in the Shakespeare Theatre's production is a heart -- or, more precisely, a tree shaped like a heart with veins and arteries for branches.Is Macbeth -- intriguingly and intensely played by Stacy Keach -- evil at heart? Or, once exposed to evil, does it spread through his veins like a disease?Keach adopts the disease model, showing us a man who, as he and his wife explain in the banquet scene with Banquo's ghost, has long suffered from "a strange infirmity."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
It's a night of oldies -- or at least new oldies. "Flipper" has a new show, Oliver North re-surfaces in a fictional role, and Andy Griffith and the Mayberry gang are featured in a cable marathon.* "Flipper" (5 p.m.-6 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- The dynamic dolphin's back! Of course, the aquatic mammal playing the part is new, and so are the humans. But this syndicated show is a new version of the 1964-1967 series about a Florida Keys family.* "Nova: What's New About Menopause" (6 p.m.-7 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67)
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1995
Writer Mary Swander will read from "Heaven-and-Earth House," her new collection of poetry, at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the Alumni House of Goucher College.A poet, playwright and essayist, Ms. Swander has written two other poetry collections -- "Driving the Body Back" and "Succession" -- as well as the non-fiction "Parsnips in the Snow" and "Land of the Fragile Giants." In addition, Ms. Swander performs her own work as part of the artistic group Wild Women.An associate professor of English at Iowa State University, Ms. Swander has won numerous awards, including the Carl Sandburg Literary Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2008
theater 'Frost/Nixon': Stacy Keach - yep, old Mike Hammer himself - makes the first of two appearances in Washington this season. This month, he portrays the disgraced former U.S. president as he engages in a battle of wits with an improbable opponent, jet-setting talk show host David Frost, in Frost/Nixon. The play runs through Nov. 30 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F St. N.W., Washington. Showtimes vary. Tickets cost $25-$80. Call 202-416-8448 or go to kennedy-center.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 15, 1995
It might take a Texas-size measure of stamina and fortitude, but if you can hang on through the first hour of "James Michener's 'Texas' " at 9 tomorrow night on ABC (WMAR-Channel 2), you've weathered the worst of this so-so miniseries.Things get a lot better in Monday night's conclusion of this four-hour fictionalized history of Texas. But "uneven" doesn't begin to cover what you'll see.The low end of the experience begins tomorrow night, when you realize in the opening minutes that Patrick Duffy is playing Stephen F. Austin with a range not quite worthy of the adjective "wooden."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
It's a night of oldies -- or at least new oldies. "Flipper" has a new show, Oliver North re-surfaces in a fictional role, and Andy Griffith and the Mayberry gang are featured in a cable marathon.* "Flipper" (5 p.m.-6 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- The dynamic dolphin's back! Of course, the aquatic mammal playing the part is new, and so are the humans. But this syndicated show is a new version of the 1964-1967 series about a Florida Keys family.* "Nova: What's New About Menopause" (6 p.m.-7 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 19, 1995
Evil is at the bloody heart of Shakespeare's great tragedy, "Macbeth," and the central scenic image in the Shakespeare Theatre's production is a heart -- or, more precisely, a tree shaped like a heart with veins and arteries for branches.Is Macbeth -- intriguingly and intensely played by Stacy Keach -- evil at heart? Or, once exposed to evil, does it spread through his veins like a disease?Keach adopts the disease model, showing us a man who, as he and his wife explain in the banquet scene with Banquo's ghost, has long suffered from "a strange infirmity."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 15, 1995
It might take a Texas-size measure of stamina and fortitude, but if you can hang on through the first hour of "James Michener's 'Texas' " at 9 tomorrow night on ABC (WMAR-Channel 2), you've weathered the worst of this so-so miniseries.Things get a lot better in Monday night's conclusion of this four-hour fictionalized history of Texas. But "uneven" doesn't begin to cover what you'll see.The low end of the experience begins tomorrow night, when you realize in the opening minutes that Patrick Duffy is playing Stephen F. Austin with a range not quite worthy of the adjective "wooden."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1995
Writer Mary Swander will read from "Heaven-and-Earth House," her new collection of poetry, at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the Alumni House of Goucher College.A poet, playwright and essayist, Ms. Swander has written two other poetry collections -- "Driving the Body Back" and "Succession" -- as well as the non-fiction "Parsnips in the Snow" and "Land of the Fragile Giants." In addition, Ms. Swander performs her own work as part of the artistic group Wild Women.An associate professor of English at Iowa State University, Ms. Swander has won numerous awards, including the Carl Sandburg Literary Award.
NEWS
By STEPHEN WIGLER | June 28, 1992
In the second scene of Shakespeare's "Richard III," the play's villainous hero, succeeds in a matter of minutes in seducing Lady Anne, whose young husband he has recently murdered, over the even more recent corpse of her beloved father-in-law. When the unfortunate woman leaves the stage, Richard turns to the audience and exults:"Was ever woman in this humor woo'd?Was ever woman in this humor won?I'll have her, but I will not keep her long."When Ian McKellen spoke those lines Tuesday night at the Kennedy Center at the Washington premiere of the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain production of the play, much of the audience laughed.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 11, 1992
Washington-- A good mystery-thriller needs two basic components. It should fool you (that's the mystery part), and it should scare you (that's the thriller part). In addition, if it's a stage play, it needs one thing more -- spine-tingling acting.Rupert Holmes' "Solitary Confinement," at the Kennedy Center on an extended pre-Broadway tour, isn't particularly frightening; there are more thrills and chills in Washington rush-hour traffic. But the play does have a humdinger of a twist. And best of all, it has a virtuoso performance by Stacy Keach as an eccentric, reclusive tycoon named Richard Jannings.
NEWS
By STEPHEN WIGLER | June 28, 1992
In the second scene of Shakespeare's "Richard III," the play's villainous hero, succeeds in a matter of minutes in seducing Lady Anne, whose young husband he has recently murdered, over the even more recent corpse of her beloved father-in-law. When the unfortunate woman leaves the stage, Richard turns to the audience and exults:"Was ever woman in this humor woo'd?Was ever woman in this humor won?I'll have her, but I will not keep her long."When Ian McKellen spoke those lines Tuesday night at the Kennedy Center at the Washington premiere of the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain production of the play, much of the audience laughed.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 14, 1992
"I have taken my life in order to provide capital for you," Alex Counsel, a real estate developer, wrote to his wife in a suicide note. "It's purely a business decision. I hope you can understand that."Understanding is not what "Suicide Notes," an HBO documentary premiering at 10 tonight, is about. It's about the fascination -- possibly morbid -- of reading suicide notes. The show examines the last written words of Counsel and four other suicides, as well as the note of a man who tried to kill himself and failed.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 24, 1990
The Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger's "Richard III" is an odd blend of blood bath and British music hall.The music hall element derives from Stacy Keach's fascinating but highly idiosyncratic performance in the title role. Delivering his soliloquies almost like stand-up comedy routines, Mr. Keach portrays Richard as if he were the comic narrator of his own tragic story.Denied many of life's pleasures because of his physical deformities, he takes pleasure in villainy instead. Conquest -- whether of women or thethrone -- is sport to him, and he exults in letting the audience in on each upcoming move.
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