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By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rushing to head off sweeping Republican changes in a troubled children's disability program, a national commission will come to Baltimore today for two days of hearings and meetings.The National Commission on Childhood Disability, which will meet at the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel, will try to fashion its own recommendations to Congress.Today the commission will hear from officials of the Social Security Administration, which runs the program, and from experts on children's disabilities.
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NEWS
March 24, 1996
SSI provides income floor for needyI am writing in response to the March 18 article, ''More disability case reviews sought.''For advocates such as myself, who experienced the aggressively hostile campaign to terminate low-income disabled persons in the 1980s, a major objective in any initiative to increase the number of reviews is to prevent those governmental abuses from recurring.We readily acknowledge that the review process is a necessary feature of any disability program and that the integrity of the program is affected by the Social Security Administration's failure to perform reviews.
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NEWS
January 22, 1995
Every taxpayer who wants government to use money wisely and in a manner helpful to the nation and its citizens will be appalled by the story in The Sun today about a Louisiana family that receives $46,716 a year, non-taxable, from the $25 billion Supplemental Security Income program, one of the chief federal welfare efforts.But the bigger outrage is not the money that a resourceful mother has succeeded in extracting for herself, her common-law husband and all seven of her children -- based on claims of mental or medical disability -- but the fact that the government, especially Congress, is the real villain in this story.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner,Sun Staff Writers | September 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A controversial Social Security program that gives cash benefits to nearly 1 million disabled children -- some of them with marginal disabilities -- should be revamped to make it harder to win benefits, a Clinton administration commission has concluded.The panel called for eligibility in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program to be tightened, although panel members were divided over how to do it. At the least, they favored changes that would drop more than 100,000 children over five years.
NEWS
March 24, 1996
SSI provides income floor for needyI am writing in response to the March 18 article, ''More disability case reviews sought.''For advocates such as myself, who experienced the aggressively hostile campaign to terminate low-income disabled persons in the 1980s, a major objective in any initiative to increase the number of reviews is to prevent those governmental abuses from recurring.We readily acknowledge that the review process is a necessary feature of any disability program and that the integrity of the program is affected by the Social Security Administration's failure to perform reviews.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Writers | February 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Looking to cut welfare spending by $43 billion over five years, a House panel approved yesterday a measure that would remove 338,000 drug addicts, alcoholics and children from a Social Security program for disabled poor people.Racing to beat a deadline in their "Contract with America" campaign manifesto, Republicans on the Ways and Means subcommittee on human resources brushed aside Democratic objections and rolled $13 billion in disability cuts into a bill that hands over to the states some 50 federal welfare programs.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner,Sun Staff Writers | September 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A controversial Social Security program that gives cash benefits to nearly 1 million disabled children -- some of them with marginal disabilities -- should be revamped to make it harder to win benefits, a Clinton administration commission has concluded.The panel called for eligibility in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program to be tightened, although panel members were divided over how to do it. At the least, they favored changes that would drop more than 100,000 children over five years.
NEWS
By Sun Washington Bureau | February 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Looking to cut welfare spending by $43 billion over five years, a House panel has approved a measure that would remove 338,000 drug addicts, alcoholics and children from a Social Security program for disabled poor people.Racing to beat a deadline in their "Contract with America" campaign manifesto, Republicans on the Ways and Means subcommittee on human resources brushed aside Democratic objections yesterday and rolled $13 billion in disability cuts into a bill that hands over to the states some 50 federal welfare programs.
NEWS
September 7, 1995
The Social Security Administration has a perverse tendency to run its programs so badly it sets up a public backlash hurtful to the very people it tries to benefit. The latest confirmation of bureaucratic mess is a General Accounting Office report on massive fraudulent payments to non-U.S. citizens, some of whom are coached by unscrupulous middlemen to fake disabilities.As The Sun reported after a nine-month investigation of the SSA's Supplemental Security Income program, federal authorities at the Woodlawn-based federal agency have known of serious shortcomings for years but have done little to correct a worsening situation.
NEWS
February 18, 1995
Nowhere in the reforms under consideration by the new Republican Congress will the distinction between lean government and mean government be more obvious than in the $25 billion Social Security program known as Supplemental Security Income (SSI). These are the abuse-prone grants described in detail recently by Sun reporters John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner.There is no question that the SSI program needs a thorough examination, along with some better ways of screening applicants and monitoring those already on the rolls.
NEWS
September 7, 1995
The Social Security Administration has a perverse tendency to run its programs so badly it sets up a public backlash hurtful to the very people it tries to benefit. The latest confirmation of bureaucratic mess is a General Accounting Office report on massive fraudulent payments to non-U.S. citizens, some of whom are coached by unscrupulous middlemen to fake disabilities.As The Sun reported after a nine-month investigation of the SSA's Supplemental Security Income program, federal authorities at the Woodlawn-based federal agency have known of serious shortcomings for years but have done little to correct a worsening situation.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As the Senate begins to shape welfare legislation this week, lawmakers are likely to scale back a sweeping House bill that would curb the burgeoning program for the aged and disabled poor.At the crux of the changes is a dispute about payments to help disabled children.Those payments form a controversial part of the $25 billion Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.A series in The Sun in January described serious problems with SSI and the companion $40 billion Disability Insurance program for people who have worked and paid Social Security taxes.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rushing to head off sweeping Republican changes in a troubled children's disability program, a national commission will come to Baltimore today for two days of hearings and meetings.The National Commission on Childhood Disability, which will meet at the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel, will try to fashion its own recommendations to Congress.Today the commission will hear from officials of the Social Security Administration, which runs the program, and from experts on children's disabilities.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
Biased CoverageI am a public interest attorney who has represented Supplemental Security Income (SSI) clients for nearly 15 years. I continue to be distressed by the nature of The Sun's coverage of the SSI program.I am writing in response to the front-page story on March 11: " 'Coached' Children Wrongly Get Benefits" by John O'Donnell.I attended the same meeting as Mr. O'Donnell and, in my opinion, he has grossly mis-characterized Dr. Bill Payne's testimony and, consistent with all of The Sun's recent stories about the SSI program, has presented a biased and incomplete description.
NEWS
February 18, 1995
Nowhere in the reforms under consideration by the new Republican Congress will the distinction between lean government and mean government be more obvious than in the $25 billion Social Security program known as Supplemental Security Income (SSI). These are the abuse-prone grants described in detail recently by Sun reporters John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner.There is no question that the SSI program needs a thorough examination, along with some better ways of screening applicants and monitoring those already on the rolls.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Writers | February 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Looking to cut welfare spending by $43 billion over five years, a House panel approved yesterday a measure that would remove 338,000 drug addicts, alcoholics and children from a Social Security program for disabled poor people.Racing to beat a deadline in their "Contract with America" campaign manifesto, Republicans on the Ways and Means subcommittee on human resources brushed aside Democratic objections and rolled $13 billion in disability cuts into a bill that hands over to the states some 50 federal welfare programs.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
Biased CoverageI am a public interest attorney who has represented Supplemental Security Income (SSI) clients for nearly 15 years. I continue to be distressed by the nature of The Sun's coverage of the SSI program.I am writing in response to the front-page story on March 11: " 'Coached' Children Wrongly Get Benefits" by John O'Donnell.I attended the same meeting as Mr. O'Donnell and, in my opinion, he has grossly mis-characterized Dr. Bill Payne's testimony and, consistent with all of The Sun's recent stories about the SSI program, has presented a biased and incomplete description.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As the Senate begins to shape welfare legislation this week, lawmakers are likely to scale back a sweeping House bill that would curb the burgeoning program for the aged and disabled poor.At the crux of the changes is a dispute about payments to help disabled children.Those payments form a controversial part of the $25 billion Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.A series in The Sun in January described serious problems with SSI and the companion $40 billion Disability Insurance program for people who have worked and paid Social Security taxes.
NEWS
By Sun Washington Bureau | February 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Looking to cut welfare spending by $43 billion over five years, a House panel has approved a measure that would remove 338,000 drug addicts, alcoholics and children from a Social Security program for disabled poor people.Racing to beat a deadline in their "Contract with America" campaign manifesto, Republicans on the Ways and Means subcommittee on human resources brushed aside Democratic objections yesterday and rolled $13 billion in disability cuts into a bill that hands over to the states some 50 federal welfare programs.
NEWS
January 22, 1995
Every taxpayer who wants government to use money wisely and in a manner helpful to the nation and its citizens will be appalled by the story in The Sun today about a Louisiana family that receives $46,716 a year, non-taxable, from the $25 billion Supplemental Security Income program, one of the chief federal welfare efforts.But the bigger outrage is not the money that a resourceful mother has succeeded in extracting for herself, her common-law husband and all seven of her children -- based on claims of mental or medical disability -- but the fact that the government, especially Congress, is the real villain in this story.
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