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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 12, 2001
It was a beautiful day at the beach -- blue sky, gentle breeze, calm sea. I knew these things because a man sitting five feet from me was shouting them into his cellular telephone, like a play-by-play announcer. "IT'S A BEAUTIFUL DAY," he shouted. "THE SKY IS BLUE, AND THERE'S A BREEZE, AND THE WATER IS CALM, AND ..." Behind me, a woman, her cell phone pressed to her ear, was pacing back and forth. "She didn't," she was saying. "No. She didn't. She did? Really? Are you serious? She did not. She did?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2009
When people who have moved away get sentimental about Baltimore, they get especially worked up about Nam Kang. This is the oldest of the several Korean restaurants in the Charles North neighborhood, the one with its entrance down a flight of exterior stairs. Nam Kang is open 17 hours a day, seven days a week, but many of its fans formed lasting attachments to it in the very small hours of the morning, after a night on the town. People will tell you that the food Nam Kang serves, especially things like spicy seafood stews, barbecued meats, and seafood pancakes, is restorative.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It's hard to believe in 1997, but there is an animal lurking in many dark and spooky places around the world that can grow longer than a bus but has never been seen alive by man.The creature is Architeuthis dux -- the giant squid of myth, legend and the much-exaggerated tales of Jules Verne's "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," and Peter Benchley's "Beast."But the giant squid is real, and Dr. Clyde F. E. Roper of the Smithsonian Institution is likely to be one of the first humans to see it in its natural habitat.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Raw or steamed, squid has little appeal to us. But bread and fry it, and we're big fans. We ordered fried calamari from four area restaurants. Here's what turned up. Mezze 1606 Thames St., Baltimore -- 410-563-7600 Hours --5 p.m.-11 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10-15 minutes Ready in --11 minutes Presentation beat out substance with this order, $9.40. With pecorino cheese, garlic sauce, chopped tomatoes and lettuce, it looked the prettiest. But there was only about half as much calamari as in the other orders.
NEWS
By KEITH O'BRIEN and KEITH O'BRIEN,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 25, 2005
The room is filled with marine life: fiddler crabs and moon snails, dogfish and flounder. There are clams stacked up by the dozen, skates hiding in the sand, and signs that require second looks. "Toadfish infected with lice," one sign says. "Do not touch." But Joe DeGiorgis, 41, walks right past it all. He has come to the Marine Resource Center in Woods Hole, Mass., for one thing and one thing only. "The squid are here," he calls out, pointing to a large oval tank. "My favorite guys." DeGiorgis, smiling, peers inside the tank.
NEWS
By David Reyes and David Reyes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 21, 2005
NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. - More than 1,500 jumbo squid - common to South America - have washed onto Orange County beaches over the past few days, leaving marine experts perplexed as to why so many of these torpedo-shaped mollusks have traveled so far north. "We've known that there's something peculiar going on with those species," said John McGowan, professor emeritus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego. Dotting Crystal Cove State Park beach up to Newport Beach, the creatures with their elongated, gooey-looking tentacles and oversized heads have caught beachgoers off-guard, said Eric Bauer, Newport Beach lifeguard captain.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 2, 2005
Anyone who's spent too many hours in his or her own brain is apt to have an excruciating yet excellent time at The Squid and the Whale. Writer-director Noah Baumbach plies the autobiographical fiction-maker's art of making the intimate universal in this rendering of his parents' breakup, set in Brooklyn in 1986. Bitterly funny about divorce, it's even sharper and more original about intellectuals and their discontent. Like a Woody Allen freed of pretension and merciless about his own prejudices and neuroses, Baumbach has an unerring ear for affectation.
NEWS
October 12, 2005
A couple of scientific breakthroughs recently caught our eye - because, in the end, they all hit close to home. First, wild gorillas were documented using a branch as a walking stick to ford a small pool. Previously, they had not been observed using tools, and so this advertised more clearly their evolutionary link to man. Second, a recently discovered planet - dubbed Xena and possibly our solar system's 10th planet - turns out to have its own moon, orbiting much like the moon circles the Earth.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | August 15, 1993
Ocean City saw its first puppy drum of the season last weekend, a 10-pounder taken by Richard Gorleski of Denton as he was drifting near the South Jettywith squid. Ocean City got quite a number of puppy drum last season, so this is a good sign of more to come.They normally are taken on cut mullet or sand fleas. Most of the time the anglers are either fishing for tautog at the jetties or bluefish in the surf when they catch these fish.Puppy drum feed on worms and crabs turned up by the waves.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
If you're taking part in the current cultural psychosis known as the low-carb revolution, this is not the cookbook for you. That's too bad. You're missing out on a host of delicious recipes for culinary pariahs like pasta, pizza and potatoes. In her latest book, Rome, at Home (Broadway Books, 2004, $29.95), food writer Suzanne Dunaway isn't particularly worried about carbohydrates - or any sort of calories, really. In addition to focaccia and linguine, many of the more than 150 recipes in the book require abundant amounts of olive oil, butter and parmesan cheese.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 27, 2006
It's time to call a moratorium on the dysfunctional-family flick. Narcissistic, adulterous or conflicted moms, distant dads, drug-riddled youngsters - don't we get enough of them on "cutting-edge" TV series these days? Ryan Murphy, who created one of those series, Nip/Tuck, seized on Running With Scissors, Augusten Burroughs' acclaimed memoir of a loony adolescence, for the comedy-drama opening today. But all he does with this prized dysfunctional-family property is turn it into a crazed Carter-era comic strip: For Better or for Worse on acid.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 15, 2006
Chicagoans have eaten oceans of squid since the growth in popularity of fried calamari. And who can blame us, because the lightly breaded calamari are delicious - whether dipped in a zesty tomato sauce or garlicky aioli or on their own. But I'll wager that only a few of us have eaten squid prepared in other ways, whether sauteed, grilled, braised or stuffed and baked. It's too bad; squid are delicious and beloved in Mediterranean and Asian cuisines. They're also rich in protein and low in saturated fat. Don't let squeamishness put you off from trying a squid recipe.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 2, 2005
Anyone who's spent too many hours in his or her own brain is apt to have an excruciating yet excellent time at The Squid and the Whale. Writer-director Noah Baumbach plies the autobiographical fiction-maker's art of making the intimate universal in this rendering of his parents' breakup, set in Brooklyn in 1986. Bitterly funny about divorce, it's even sharper and more original about intellectuals and their discontent. Like a Woody Allen freed of pretension and merciless about his own prejudices and neuroses, Baumbach has an unerring ear for affectation.
NEWS
By KEITH O'BRIEN and KEITH O'BRIEN,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 25, 2005
The room is filled with marine life: fiddler crabs and moon snails, dogfish and flounder. There are clams stacked up by the dozen, skates hiding in the sand, and signs that require second looks. "Toadfish infected with lice," one sign says. "Do not touch." But Joe DeGiorgis, 41, walks right past it all. He has come to the Marine Resource Center in Woods Hole, Mass., for one thing and one thing only. "The squid are here," he calls out, pointing to a large oval tank. "My favorite guys." DeGiorgis, smiling, peers inside the tank.
NEWS
October 12, 2005
A couple of scientific breakthroughs recently caught our eye - because, in the end, they all hit close to home. First, wild gorillas were documented using a branch as a walking stick to ford a small pool. Previously, they had not been observed using tools, and so this advertised more clearly their evolutionary link to man. Second, a recently discovered planet - dubbed Xena and possibly our solar system's 10th planet - turns out to have its own moon, orbiting much like the moon circles the Earth.
NEWS
By David Reyes and David Reyes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 21, 2005
NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. - More than 1,500 jumbo squid - common to South America - have washed onto Orange County beaches over the past few days, leaving marine experts perplexed as to why so many of these torpedo-shaped mollusks have traveled so far north. "We've known that there's something peculiar going on with those species," said John McGowan, professor emeritus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego. Dotting Crystal Cove State Park beach up to Newport Beach, the creatures with their elongated, gooey-looking tentacles and oversized heads have caught beachgoers off-guard, said Eric Bauer, Newport Beach lifeguard captain.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Raw or steamed, squid has little appeal to us. But bread and fry it, and we're big fans. We ordered fried calamari from four area restaurants. Here's what turned up. Mezze 1606 Thames St., Baltimore -- 410-563-7600 Hours --5 p.m.-11 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10-15 minutes Ready in --11 minutes Presentation beat out substance with this order, $9.40. With pecorino cheese, garlic sauce, chopped tomatoes and lettuce, it looked the prettiest. But there was only about half as much calamari as in the other orders.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | September 20, 1992
It's that time of year. Fish sense the coming of autumn, the dropping water temperatures, and the need to migrate south. They begin feeding heavily, and large flounder that kept to themselves all summer suddenly make their move out of the bay. (One wonders where they've been all summer.)One of the best places to fish for flounder this time of year (for folks without a boat) is the U.S. 50 bridge. The bridge offers two channels that are teeming with fish. Two to three hours on each side of the high tide are the best times to go.Anglers should cast into the channels with frozen shiners hooked through the eyes with a 2- to 3-inch-long strip of squid hooked beside the shiner on the same hook.
NEWS
By William Mullen and William Mullen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 27, 2004
Looking and acting something like an underwater canister vacuum cleaner, a prehistoric marine reptile apparently used its extremely long neck to sneak up on and suck in unwary fish swimming in murky shoreline waters 230 million years ago. The creature was discovered two years ago in China and named Dinocephalosaurus orientalis, or "terrible-headed lizard from the Orient." Figuring out what the fossil was and how it lived took the combined skills of the Chinese paleontologist who found it, an expert on fossil reptiles from the Field Museum in Chicago and a University of Chicago expert in biomechanics who studies how scallops swim.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
If you're taking part in the current cultural psychosis known as the low-carb revolution, this is not the cookbook for you. That's too bad. You're missing out on a host of delicious recipes for culinary pariahs like pasta, pizza and potatoes. In her latest book, Rome, at Home (Broadway Books, 2004, $29.95), food writer Suzanne Dunaway isn't particularly worried about carbohydrates - or any sort of calories, really. In addition to focaccia and linguine, many of the more than 150 recipes in the book require abundant amounts of olive oil, butter and parmesan cheese.
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