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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Every time baby squash in my garden starts to grow, it dies. I hose down the garden every day, but it still gets fuzzy and dries up. How can I stop this? Most vegetables don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by warm, rainy days with overcast, humid conditions. Overhead watering, watering too often, and plants crowding so they don't get good air circulation all contribute to choanephora. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash and pumpkin blossoms, causing them to abort, or causing them to wither at the connection of the blossoms to the young fruit.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
When we realized our zucchini were dying of squash vine borer, we tried making the vertical cuts in the stem and fishing out the white grubby worms, but we were too late. How can we never have that happen to our beautiful zucchini? Plant late and protect. Put out transplants or plant seeds in mid-June. Then keep them covered with floating row cover until flowers open so the adult vine borer (a moth) can't get to the zucchini to lay its eggs. You'll still have time for plenty of zucchini and even more plantings.
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NEWS
November 24, 1992
Stuffed Squash1 large Turkish or Hubbard squash or pumpkin12 slices bread ( 1/2 white, 1/2 whole wheat bread)1/2 cup butter1 stalk celery1 onion1/2 tsp. sage1 tsp. thyme1 vegetable bouillon cube1 tbsp. Braggs Liquid Aminos1/2 cup boiling waterOpen squash. Scrape seeds out of cavity. Prepare stuffing. Place bread slices on cookie sheets in 400-degree oven for 15 minutes to dry out bread so stuffing holds together better. Meanwhile, melt butter in large saucepan. Chop celery and onion, add to butter.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Every time baby squash in my garden starts to grow, it dies. I hose down the garden every day, but it still gets fuzzy and dries up. How can I stop this? Most vegetables don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by warm, rainy days with overcast, humid conditions. Overhead watering, watering too often, and plants crowding so they don't get good air circulation all contribute to choanephora. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash and pumpkin blossoms, causing them to abort, or causing them to wither at the connection of the blossoms to the young fruit.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to the Sun | July 19, 2008
Every time a baby squash starts to grow, it dies. I water the garden every day with a hose, but my squash still dry up. How can I stop this? Most vegetable plants don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by rainy years but also by watering overhead and too often. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash (and pumpkin) blossoms, causing them to abort or, at the connection of the blossom to the young fruit, to wither. Try watering at the base of the plants, only to supplement rainfall.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | June 22, 1991
Zucchini season is near, and I am ready this year.I moved the wheelbarrow next to the squash patch. I cleared out the refrigerator. I opened all my cookbooks to the letter Z.I schmoozed up to friends and neighbors, who are about to be buried in green. I lifted weights in anticipation of harvesting the one zucchini that always manages to hide in the garden until it's the size of Cal Ripken's bat.Don't get me wrong. I love zucchini. I look forward to picking the first ones from the garden.But by the 50th zucchini, I'm going crazy.
FEATURES
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 25, 1995
I came late to the squash fan club. Although my childhood was spent in the Southwest, where some of these versatile vegetables originated, I don't remember eating more than pumpkin on a regular basis.My mother did her vegetable gardening in the canned goods aisle at the local grocery store, and pumpkin was a staple only because all our neighbors were Mexicans who didn't wait around for Thanksgiving to eat it. They baked it into sweet empanadas all year. They savored the seeds, roasted and salted, as pepitas.
FEATURES
July 14, 1996
My young squash are turning yellow and falling off before they mature. What can I do?This might be the result of the low bee activity we've been experiencing recently.Members of the squash family require pollination from bees. Young fruits that are not pollinated may turn yellow or become malformed before dropping off prematurely. Low bee activity has become an alarming trend across the state recently because of two mite parasites infecting both domestic and wild beehives.Gardeners can transfer the pollen from male squash flowers to female flowers (which have a swelling at their base)
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 9, 1998
On the dinner plate or in the garden, zucchini is one of those things in life that's most appreciated when there's just enough of it, less so when there's an overabundance.Still, it's a good idea, given zucchini's prolific nature, to prepare to handle a bumper crop from the backyard garden or a neighbor's largess.Tips:* Fresh zucchini (green or yellow) should be firm, with no brown spots. Smaller squash (6 inches or less) are usually sweeter than larger, more mature ones. Store in a loosely closed plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to three days.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
Mark Stevenson of Lakeport, Calif., requested a recipe that his friend and wife made out of zucchini and yellow crookneck squash. "It was wonderful on hamburgers and hot dogs. I've not had contact with these friends for four years and have searched for this recipe but can't find it. I'd appreciate your help." Mrs. Wally A. Hoggatt of Rogers, Ark., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. She wrote, "I've used a hand grinder with a coarse blade for years, but with a food processor it will be quicker.
SPORTS
By Matt Hamilton, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
The sound of Stan Dorney's red-and-blue shoes squeaking on the hardwood floor bounced off the three white walls splattered with blue streaks, a reminder of the number of games of squash the court has endured. Squeaks continue as the ball makes a popping sound, ricocheting off the front wall, then the right wall, then back to the hardwood floors before it is picked up by another racket. Dorney, dressed in a white shirt and white shorts, shifts his weight forward and back, left and right, trying to hit each ball before it bounces twice.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
After watching Virginia score 11 goals in 41 minutes, 29 seconds against Jack Runkel on Thursday night, Loyola coach Charley Toomey decided to sit the senior goalkeeper in favor of junior Pat McEnerney. McEnerney surrendered three goals in 20:13, including the game-winning tally by Cavaliers sophomore attackman James Pannell with 2:13 left in overtime . But Toomey said Friday that his faith in Runkel, who has started since his sophomore year, has not been shaken. “I think Jack would be the first to tell you that he struggled last night,” Toomey said.
HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, For The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from Rachel Ernzen. This time of year, consider featuring local winter squash. Winter squash packs a nutritional punch and its varieties are rich in fiber, vitamin A and potassium. There are many markets and grocery stores that offer produce grown within the state or from neighboring states. Here's a sampling of fun facts, tidbits and some suggestions for serving winter squash (generalizations of recipes I have at home or have made up)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
The thing about summer squash is that it's pretty good just steamed and with some salt and pepper. But with an abundance of it in my fridge, I decided to try something more adventurous I found an interesting recipe for grilled squash with lemon juice, feta and mint on Chow.com. Then I found another recipe that was similar but the squash was roasted and the herb was thyme - and instead of lemon juice, balsamic vinegar gave the dish a little acid. I decided to do a combination of the two recipes using the ingredients I had on hand, which included some mint growing in a pot on my deck that needed to be picked (or moved)
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Sports Digest | May 7, 2013
Colleges Ex-Raven Testaverde chosen for football HOF The National Football Foundation announced that former Ravens quarterback Vinny Testaverde will be a member of the 2013 College Football Hall of Fame Class. Testaverde starred at Miami from 1982 to 1986. The entire class will be unveiled today during a news conference at the NASDAQ OMX MarketSite in New York's Times Square at 11:30 a.m. The Football Bowl Subdivision Class will be inducted at the NFF awards dinner Dec. 10 at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York.
SPORTS
By Tom Schad, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Wade Johnstone started playing squash in his native Australia when he was 3 years old. In the 28 years since, the sport has left him exhausted, frustrated, lonely, perpetually broke - and very happy with it all. Last week, Johnstone finished his daily workout and slouched in a chair at the Bare Hills Racquet and Fitness Club in northern Baltimore, where he has been the head squash pro for more than eight years. Six white-walled squash courts with glass doors sprawled in front of him. His office, which is little more than a desk and burgundy swivel chair, sat behind him. “This is my second home,” the 31-year-old said with a laugh.
FEATURES
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | July 19, 2007
In a space not much bigger than a hamster cage, longtime squash players David Jung and John Dewis look like human pinballs -- moving in lightning-quick steps, deftly avoiding each other as they change course, wielding their feather-light squash rackets like overzealous exterminators. They're a blur of motion and flying sweat as they take turns slamming the ball into the wall, dashing out of the ball's way and positioning themselves for a rapid-fire return. In the course of their 45-minute game, they will burn more than 700 calories, according to calories perhour.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and By Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | October 17, 2004
If you type the word "squash" into an Internet search engine, the results will likely be recipes for vegetarian casseroles. But increasingly you will also find information on the indoor racket sport that Beth Fenwick plays and coaches at the Merritt Athletic Club on Fort Avenue. Squash has emerged from the elite private clubs and colleges where it had been played pretty exclusively since it was invented around 1830 at Harrow, the British school whose notable graduates include poet Lord Byron and Winston Churchill.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | February 12, 2013
WWE "go home" shows always seem to be the most scrutinized. Often, pundits will cast away the past several weeks of television and focus most on the last Raw before a pay-per-view event, often with the same question -- did this show make me interested in buying the pay-per-view? While it's a fair question, perhaps its a skewed way to look at it when you are analyzing just one isolated show -- in particular, the closing moments of that show. If we were to do that for this past episode of Raw, then the closing segment did a very good job of creating interest and generating buys for the Elimination Chamber pay-per-view coming this Sunday.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 27, 2012
Now that we have gorged ourselves on holiday meals, it's time to get back to healthy eating. The latest healthy recipe comes from Jay Wilson, senior program director at the Dancel Family Center Y in Ellicott City. It is butternut squash chicken salad. Wilson said he has been cooking since age 12 and you can often find him in the kitchen experimenting with new recipes. He loves to share his creations with colleagues. His duties at the Y include coordinating sports and fitness activities and teaching boot camp classes.
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