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Square Foot

SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 20, 2008
Eight years ago next month, the state bought 600 acres surrounding Deep Creek Lake, Western Maryland's prime vacation spot, to keep it from looking like Coney Island. The lake was added to the state parks system while most of the surrounding land was put up for sale to adjacent property owners. But the so-called Buydown Program is coming to an end. "We're trying to get through to people who haven't participated," said David Humphrey, Department of General Services spokesman. "They have until the end of the year, but they have to start thinking about it and planning for it."
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BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | November 16, 2007
The Laurelford community off Falls Road in northern Baltimore County is resplendent in its variety of stately, custom-built homes. Predominately Georgian and Colonial in style, they rest on large landscaped lots surrounded by tall trees. One of the first houses in the neighborhood - built in 1988 - was set apart in both space and style. Placed off the beaten path on nine wooded acres at the end of a cul-de-sac, the contemporary design, with its brick construction and commercial-looking doors and windows, was the joke of the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun reporter | May 20, 2007
The city of Annapolis will break ground today on a 60,000-square-foot recreation center at Truxtun Park, 20 years after it was first recommended in a master plan for the city. The $12.5 million facility, named for former Mayor Roger "Pip" Moyer, will be accompanied by a $1 million maintenance building and will replace the 15,000 square-foot Annapolis Recreation Center downtown. "It gives us a single location to get the entire city together for recreation, whether it's indoor basketball or a crafts class," said Ward 6 Alderman Julie Stankivic, whose district includes Truxtun Park.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2007
KEY LARGO, FLA. 100 GREATEST TRIPS Travel + Leisure Books / $34.95 So many destinations, not enough time. But that doesn't seem to have prevented the editors of Travel + Leisure magazine from assembling a list of what they call the "100 Greatest Trips." Given the sophistication of the magazine, it is not surprising that the suggestions veer on the side of the classy, the urbane and the chic, with an emphasis on the arts. They write about gallery hopping around New York City, a culinary tour of Brittany, France, learning to draw and paint in Florence, Italy, a cinematic pilgrimage to Rome and much more.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,sun reporter | October 26, 2006
One of downtown Baltimore's trophy office buildings, 500 E. Pratt St., is on the market and generating strong interest from potential buyers, an owner's representative said yesterday. The owner of the 12-story tower, one of the newest at the Inner Harbor, will be considering offers over the next couple of weeks and expects to select a buyer before Thanksgiving, said Bruce Strasburg, a principal and senior vice president with Trammell Crow Co.'s Washington office. Trammell Crow is representing the building's owner, Multi-Employer Property Trust, a pool of public and private pension funds.
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2006
One brightly lit spacious area houses a lab where scientists use an array of chemicals to analyze blood found at a crime scene. Not far from there is the unit where investigators examine objects for the faintest of fingerprints. A few doors down is an area where police chemists work to identify suspected illegal drugs. What may sound like the set for a TV crime drama is the Maryland State Police's new $30 million Forensic Science Laboratory, which was completed in March but opened yesterday for a news media tour.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
A spacious Cape Cod house on Solomons Island Road - with 6,000 square feet of space - is on the auction block. The place has high ceilings, loads of bathrooms and is situated on a busy Edgewater artery. The World War II-era building sits on more than an acre and was last occupied by Anne Arundel County police officers. The former Southern District maintains many of its former charms: lockers, a white board for shift assignments, bulletproof glass and at least five jail cells. Prospective buyers inspected the brick-front building from top to bottom at an open house this week, and a public auction of the property will be held Tuesday, marking the first time the county will try to sell a property in this fashion.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2005
Five years ago, four grandmothers marched into the mayor's office with children in tow. They said their Edgewood neighborhood needed a new community center to replace the shack where kids didn't have enough room to play pingpong and pool at the same time. The grandmothers wouldn't take no for an answer. Yesterday, the determined women joined Mayor Martin O'Malley in opening the 5,700-square-foot Edgewood Lyndhurst Recreation Center in West Baltimore, the first such center built in the city since 1975.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2005
On the occasion of her 65th birthday yesterday, Carroll Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge delivered good news to patrons of the North Carroll Senior Center. Over lunch at the center, Gouge announced the county had just signed a lease for a much larger space across the street. For $17,000 a month, the county will rent the largest building in North Carroll Shopping Center, a space vacated several years ago by Ames Department Stores. "It is not usually feasible for us to rent, but this situation is very attractive," said Ralph Green, director of the county's Department of General Services.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 22, 2005
The building is new, which means it instantly seems out of place, considering that nothing else on the property is less than two centuries old. Despite the incongruity, the structure on the 232-acre Mount Pleasant Farm in Woodstock is the doorway to the past and the future and, its owners hope, will instill the public with an understanding and appreciation of the environment and nature. That is a tall order for a structure not even 9,000 square feet and that from the outside resembles a barn, but the Howard County Conservancy is banking on the appeal of its new education center.
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