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ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | July 22, 2004
OVER THE PAST week I've learned more about the plumbing of Microsoft Internet Explorer than I ever wanted to know. That's because I had to spend entirely too much of my spare time exterminating spyware, adware and other kinds of malware from my son's laptop computer. I mentioned the issue briefly last week when I thought I'd removed all the little devils. But I was wrong - it took several more hours' work over the weekend to find the last browser hijacker and terminate it. In the end, I had to use two general purpose spyware removers, one highly specific junkware nuker and a couple of utility programs designed for geeks who are willing to muck around in the Windows registry.
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 5, 2008
The most serious threat to your computer and other electronics today might not be a virus or spyware attack. It's a summer thunderstorm - or more precisely, the sudden blackouts and power surges that lightning can cause. If you haven't done anything to protect your equipment against this threat, it's time. And if you haven't checked the protective devices you bought a couple of years ago, it's time for that, too.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | July 29, 2004
TIRED OF SPYWARE, adware and other slimeware that sneaks onto your computer, snoops while you surf the Web, steals personal information, hijacks your Web browser and slows your PC to a crawl? You don't have to put up with it. With a basic toolkit and a lot of patience, you can get rid of most of these parasites and maybe keep them from coming back. Before you start, look for help online. Spyware is so pervasive and annoying that a whole cottage industry of Web sites has grown up to help keep it in check.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Atlanta Journal-Constitution | June 28, 2007
At times, when I am working at my com- puter something begins to run in the background that slows everything down. Nothing appears on the screen to indicate what it might be. The slowdown will last for a brief period, then all is back to normal for a short time, then the slowdown will begin again. Do you have any suggestions as to what is causing this or what I can do? - Donald W. Titus, Boerne, Texas My first guess is that you have a spyware problem. These tiny programs report back to their owners - they're spying on you. Some computers can have 200 or more of these programs on the hard disk, a lot for a computer to handle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
Worried about hackers sneaking into your computer, ruining files and lighting out with your most private documents? Maybe you should be more worried about the nosy software you invite in through the front door. "Spyware," as it's known in the trade, is often attached to free programs downloaded from the Internet. It can collect information about your browsing habits and secretly ship it back to advertisers or marketers. They, in turn, may use it to send you targeted ads, or sell it to others.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | September 21, 2006
I notice that after the America Online security center does a scan for spyware on my computer and I follow that up immediately with a scan by another spyware product, it discovers a lot of adware and a number of cookies that AOL left on my computer. I'm wondering if AOL parks its own spy- and adware on my computer and has its spyware scanner ignore it. If so, that is a breach of trust, don't you think? - Nadya Krylov "AOL is the kindest, most generous, most wonderful online service on earth," said the brainwashed columnist just back from a vacation in Manchuria.
BUSINESS
By ST. PETERSBURG TIMES | August 9, 2005
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The very private details of people's lives flashed on a wall at Sunbelt Software yesterday. Social Security numbers. Credit-card numbers. Bank account numbers, eBay and PayPal account numbers. Online user names and passwords. And more. All of it was projected on a wall at an office at Sunbelt Software's office in Clearwater. All of it was live from a Web site. All of it was taken secretly from computers here and around the world. Most, if not all, of the victims had no idea they had been snared by intrusive software known as spyware.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2005
America Online Inc., which centered a humorous advertising campaign on its efforts to protect people from Internet intrusions, found itself answering yesterday for a Baltimore subsidiary that was accused of installing spyware on people's computers -- under the guise that it was providing spyware protection. AOL wasn't named or included in a settlement announced yesterday between the Federal Trade Commission and Advertising.com, which AOL acquired last year for $435 million. The incidents took place in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Teresa McUsic and Teresa McUsic,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 7, 2004
Those irritating problems of the computer world - spam, viruses and spyware - continue to grow exponentially, according to a survey by Consumer Reports. Despite the first federal law regulating junk e-mail going into effect last January, spam still outnumbered legitimate messages, according to the survey of 2,000 e-mail users. And most of us are aware of viruses, which can come from e-mail and from downloading software. But spyware, which marketing companies use to "spy" on your Internet usage and send pop-up screens to lure you away from your regular sites, is also becoming more of a problem, according to Consumer Reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 22, 2006
I have subscribed to Norton Internet Security for years, and I've been quite satisfied. Now my SBC Yahoo DSL service offers a free download of Internet security with anti-spyware, firewalls and anti-virus protection. But they say I must uninstall any other anti-virus programs before adopting theirs. I'm wondering if I'd be safe with the SBC version and save the cost of Norton. I'm sure a lot of other Yahoo customers are curious about this also. - Jim Bergstrom, yahoo.com If you had auto insurance from State Farm, would you go out and buy a policy from Allstate so that you would be covered by both?
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Imagine a burglar with the key to your house and the code to turn off your alarm system, making it easy to steal from you without you knowing anything happened. That could be happening on your computer right now. Experts warn that unseen cyber-thieves use aptly named "spyware" programs to snoop around computers, farming personal data and passwords and tracing every keystroke users make. Some members of Congress are trying to beef up laws against cyber-snooping, but critics say the proposals might go too far. Few disagree about spyware's potential for damage.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | September 21, 2006
I notice that after the America Online security center does a scan for spyware on my computer and I follow that up immediately with a scan by another spyware product, it discovers a lot of adware and a number of cookies that AOL left on my computer. I'm wondering if AOL parks its own spy- and adware on my computer and has its spyware scanner ignore it. If so, that is a breach of trust, don't you think? - Nadya Krylov "AOL is the kindest, most generous, most wonderful online service on earth," said the brainwashed columnist just back from a vacation in Manchuria.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 22, 2006
I have subscribed to Norton Internet Security for years, and I've been quite satisfied. Now my SBC Yahoo DSL service offers a free download of Internet security with anti-spyware, firewalls and anti-virus protection. But they say I must uninstall any other anti-virus programs before adopting theirs. I'm wondering if I'd be safe with the SBC version and save the cost of Norton. I'm sure a lot of other Yahoo customers are curious about this also. - Jim Bergstrom, yahoo.com If you had auto insurance from State Farm, would you go out and buy a policy from Allstate so that you would be covered by both?
BUSINESS
By ST. PETERSBURG TIMES | August 9, 2005
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The very private details of people's lives flashed on a wall at Sunbelt Software yesterday. Social Security numbers. Credit-card numbers. Bank account numbers, eBay and PayPal account numbers. Online user names and passwords. And more. All of it was projected on a wall at an office at Sunbelt Software's office in Clearwater. All of it was live from a Web site. All of it was taken secretly from computers here and around the world. Most, if not all, of the victims had no idea they had been snared by intrusive software known as spyware.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2005
America Online Inc., which centered a humorous advertising campaign on its efforts to protect people from Internet intrusions, found itself answering yesterday for a Baltimore subsidiary that was accused of installing spyware on people's computers -- under the guise that it was providing spyware protection. AOL wasn't named or included in a settlement announced yesterday between the Federal Trade Commission and Advertising.com, which AOL acquired last year for $435 million. The incidents took place in 2003.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 17, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - Add personal computers to the list of throwaways in the disposable society. On a recent Sunday morning when Lew Tucker's Dell desktop computer was overrun by spyware and adware - stealth software that delivers intrusive advertising messages and even gathers data from the user's machine - he did not simply get rid of the offending programs. He threw out the whole computer. Tucker, an Internet industry executive who holds a doctorate in computer science, decided that rather than take the time to remove the offending software, he would spend $400 on a new machine.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | July 14, 2005
IT MAY NOT be easy to define spyware, but if your computer is infected with it, you probably know what it looks like. It makes ads for porn sites pop up, hijacks your Web browser to a site you've never heard of or slows your computer to a crawl for no apparent reason. That's if you're lucky. In the worst case, you may not know you're infected at all as some forms of spyware track your Web surfing habits, steal your passwords and credit card numbers, or turn your computer into a "zombie" that sends out thousands of spam e-mails.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Atlanta Journal-Constitution | June 28, 2007
At times, when I am working at my com- puter something begins to run in the background that slows everything down. Nothing appears on the screen to indicate what it might be. The slowdown will last for a brief period, then all is back to normal for a short time, then the slowdown will begin again. Do you have any suggestions as to what is causing this or what I can do? - Donald W. Titus, Boerne, Texas My first guess is that you have a spyware problem. These tiny programs report back to their owners - they're spying on you. Some computers can have 200 or more of these programs on the hard disk, a lot for a computer to handle.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | July 14, 2005
IT MAY NOT be easy to define spyware, but if your computer is infected with it, you probably know what it looks like. It makes ads for porn sites pop up, hijacks your Web browser to a site you've never heard of or slows your computer to a crawl for no apparent reason. That's if you're lucky. In the worst case, you may not know you're infected at all as some forms of spyware track your Web surfing habits, steal your passwords and credit card numbers, or turn your computer into a "zombie" that sends out thousands of spam e-mails.
NEWS
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 29, 2005
Jalapenos dancing across your computer screen might look amusing, but their charm wanes once you realize they spice up your PC with unwanted pop-up ads. This malevolent software, known as adware, is rising rapidly as an Internet menace, rivaling spam in annoyance but potentially far more damaging. Its cousin, spyware, sits unseen on a computer but has the ability to track Internet use - including some programs that monitor keystrokes, a serious security threat. Yesterday, New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer filed a lawsuit against Los Angeles-based Intermix Media Inc., accusing the marketing firm of secretly installing spyware and adware on millions of home computers.
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