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SPORTS
April 2, 2008
Bill Belichick insists there are no new revelations forthcoming about Spygate. "I think they've addressed everything they possibly can address," the New England Patriots coach said yesterday morning. Belichick, speaking during the AFC coaches breakfast at the NFL meetings in Palm Beach, Fla., said he was interviewed again after the Super Bowl about allegations that former team employee Matt Walsh had illegal tapes. Those tapes presumably included a walkthrough by the St. Louis Rams on the day before the 2002 Super Bowl, a game the Patriots won. "I've addressed so many questions so many times from so many people I don't know what else the league could ask," Belichick said.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | May 2, 2012
The two names you read here and pretty much everywhere else in the days leading up to the draft as it related to the Ravens and their original 29th overall pick were Alabama linebacker Dont'a Hightower and Wisconsin center Peter Konz . As it turns out, neither was as high on the Ravens' draft board as we all thought. In a live chat yesterday on the Ravens' team website, www.baltimoreravens.com , director of player personnel Eric DeCosta said that the team had about seven players that it really liked in the first round and Hightower was “not one of the players that we would have traded to get.” Again, that doesn't mean that the Ravens weren't interested in Hightower, but it does make it pretty clear that they liked several other players better.
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SPORTS
February 2, 2008
PHOENIX-- --The asterisk is there, and it's not going away for the foreseeable future. If there was still doubt as tomorrow's Super Bowl approaches that the taint of Spygate would be attached to the New England Patriots and Bill Belichick if they finish 19-0 this season, it disappeared yesterday, with the morning edition of The New York Times and the ensuing state-of-the-NFL press conference by commissioner Roger Goodell. In his 45 minutes before the cameras, Goodell had to answer a volley of questions about Spygate, and the news, in the Times, of Sen. Arlen Specter's plans to call Goodell and other NFL officials before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the issue.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 15, 2008
As expected, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter's concerns over Spygate were not allayed by his conversation with ex-New England Patriots employee Matt Walsh. To the contrary, Specter was moved to call for an independent investigation. If you read the full text of Specter's "floor statement" on the subject, he makes what some might consider a pretty strong prima-facie case for such an inquiry based on circumstantial evidence -- for example, anecdotal observations that link rule-breaking videotaping with subsequent improved Patriots performances, and inconsistencies in the NFL's own inquiry and disclosures.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 15, 2008
As expected, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter's concerns over Spygate were not allayed by his conversation with ex-New England Patriots employee Matt Walsh. To the contrary, Specter was moved to call for an independent investigation. If you read the full text of Specter's "floor statement" on the subject, he makes what some might consider a pretty strong prima-facie case for such an inquiry based on circumstantial evidence -- for example, anecdotal observations that link rule-breaking videotaping with subsequent improved Patriots performances, and inconsistencies in the NFL's own inquiry and disclosures.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 8, 2008
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell is floating a handful of anti-cheating measures past the league's competition committee that have this simple message written all over them: "Get that stinkin' Arlen Specter off my back!" Because other than providing some window dressing that Goodell is cracking down on Spygate-type shenanigans and appeasing the U.S. senator who has been harping on the Patriots video taping scandal, I don't see much of a point to some of these notions. Here's what Goodell reportedly wants the competition committee to consider: Surprise inspections of locker rooms, press-level areas where coaches presumably work and in-game communications equipment.
SPORTS
February 24, 2008
Orioles' MacPhail deserves credit for long-term success strategy Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail has been criticized on his offseason moves to rebuild the club. This is because some fans don't understand the process of rebuilding. To gain a successful and stable future, some of the present must be sacrificed. It's unrealistic to use limited resources to sign high-priced free agents because there are too many holes to fill. Therefore, veterans have to be traded to receive talented young players.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | May 2, 2012
The two names you read here and pretty much everywhere else in the days leading up to the draft as it related to the Ravens and their original 29th overall pick were Alabama linebacker Dont'a Hightower and Wisconsin center Peter Konz . As it turns out, neither was as high on the Ravens' draft board as we all thought. In a live chat yesterday on the Ravens' team website, www.baltimoreravens.com , director of player personnel Eric DeCosta said that the team had about seven players that it really liked in the first round and Hightower was “not one of the players that we would have traded to get.” Again, that doesn't mean that the Ravens weren't interested in Hightower, but it does make it pretty clear that they liked several other players better.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 12, 2008
Everybody wants Spygate to go away. That's understandable. Especially when "everybody" includes the NFL itself. But we have to accept that, and this, too: The final resolution will not be fair. Everything about this unsavory affair, from the first revelation of the New England Patriots' illegally taping opposing coaching signals to the NFL's clumsy explanations of its every investigative half-step, has reeked of unfairness. It's too early to judge everything about this situation because the latest round of evidence against the Patriots just arrived at the NFL offices, and tomorrow, ex-Patriots employee/tape smuggler Matt Walsh gets his day in front of both Roger Goodell and the NFL commissioner's arch-nemesis, Sen. Arlen Specter.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
Reserve linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo apologized today for comments he made last night on his Twitter account criticizing the New England Patriots, the Ravens' opponent in Sunday's AFC championship game. "I made selfish comments on twitter last night that reflected poorly upon myself, my teammates, and the organization," Ayanbadejo said on his Twitter account today. "For that I apologize. " As the Patriots were putting the finishing touches on a 41-28 victory Sunday over the Houston Texans that created a rematch in the AFC title contest, Ayanbadejo was taking several shots at the New England organization.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 12, 2008
Everybody wants Spygate to go away. That's understandable. Especially when "everybody" includes the NFL itself. But we have to accept that, and this, too: The final resolution will not be fair. Everything about this unsavory affair, from the first revelation of the New England Patriots' illegally taping opposing coaching signals to the NFL's clumsy explanations of its every investigative half-step, has reeked of unfairness. It's too early to judge everything about this situation because the latest round of evidence against the Patriots just arrived at the NFL offices, and tomorrow, ex-Patriots employee/tape smuggler Matt Walsh gets his day in front of both Roger Goodell and the NFL commissioner's arch-nemesis, Sen. Arlen Specter.
SPORTS
April 2, 2008
Bill Belichick insists there are no new revelations forthcoming about Spygate. "I think they've addressed everything they possibly can address," the New England Patriots coach said yesterday morning. Belichick, speaking during the AFC coaches breakfast at the NFL meetings in Palm Beach, Fla., said he was interviewed again after the Super Bowl about allegations that former team employee Matt Walsh had illegal tapes. Those tapes presumably included a walkthrough by the St. Louis Rams on the day before the 2002 Super Bowl, a game the Patriots won. "I've addressed so many questions so many times from so many people I don't know what else the league could ask," Belichick said.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 8, 2008
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell is floating a handful of anti-cheating measures past the league's competition committee that have this simple message written all over them: "Get that stinkin' Arlen Specter off my back!" Because other than providing some window dressing that Goodell is cracking down on Spygate-type shenanigans and appeasing the U.S. senator who has been harping on the Patriots video taping scandal, I don't see much of a point to some of these notions. Here's what Goodell reportedly wants the competition committee to consider: Surprise inspections of locker rooms, press-level areas where coaches presumably work and in-game communications equipment.
SPORTS
February 24, 2008
Orioles' MacPhail deserves credit for long-term success strategy Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail has been criticized on his offseason moves to rebuild the club. This is because some fans don't understand the process of rebuilding. To gain a successful and stable future, some of the present must be sacrificed. It's unrealistic to use limited resources to sign high-priced free agents because there are too many holes to fill. Therefore, veterans have to be traded to receive talented young players.
SPORTS
February 2, 2008
PHOENIX-- --The asterisk is there, and it's not going away for the foreseeable future. If there was still doubt as tomorrow's Super Bowl approaches that the taint of Spygate would be attached to the New England Patriots and Bill Belichick if they finish 19-0 this season, it disappeared yesterday, with the morning edition of The New York Times and the ensuing state-of-the-NFL press conference by commissioner Roger Goodell. In his 45 minutes before the cameras, Goodell had to answer a volley of questions about Spygate, and the news, in the Times, of Sen. Arlen Specter's plans to call Goodell and other NFL officials before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the issue.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | April 18, 2008
So Congress has gotten worked up about steroids in baseball. Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania became involved in the NFL's Spygate. And legislators from the state of Washington are trying to stop the possible move of the NBA's Seattle SuperSonics to Oklahoma City. So why should anyone be surprised that three members of the U.S. House of Representatives want to pass a resolution to have the Justice Department look into college football's Bowl Championship Series system to see whether it violates federal laws.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 12, 2008
A year ago, the New England Patriots suffered a black eye over Spygate, admitting to having broken NFL rules in their zeal to scout opposing teams. It was a national embarrassment to the organization, and owner Bob Kraft wound up apologizing to his fellow owners. However, this year, the Patriots are coming out of the gate as a franchise doing something entirely admirable. Today, the Patriots, along with the Federal Reserve, are holding a giant mortgage consultation at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Mass.
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