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NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 5, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Have I got a spy story for you. It takes place just before the Iraq war. It reads like a thriller, except you can't believe the spooks in the story could be so clumsy. The most hair-raising chapter tells the tale of a defector named Curveball, who duped the United States into believing that Iraq had mobile germ-warfare labs. The saddest part of the tale is that it's all true. I refer to Thursday's report by the presidential commission that has been examining the ability of U.S. spy agencies to find foreign weapons of mass destruction.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow | June 10, 2007
BREACH -- Universal / 29.98 A key question of post-Sept. 11 life - "Whom can you trust?" - receives quietly horrifying treatment in Breach, the real-life tale of an espionage case that unfolded early in 2001 and that would have dominated headlines for many months had it not been for Sept. 11. Robert Hanssen spent 22 of his 25 years in the FBI divulging secrets to the U.S.S.R. and then to the new Russia. He passed along the names of KGB agents on the U.S. payroll as well as emergency protocols for relocating the president.
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NEWS
By MAGGIE GALLAGHER and MAGGIE GALLAGHER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
"Sleeper Spy," by William Safire. New York: Random House. 451 pages. $24 Where James Bond led the way, almost every spy thriller has followed: At the center of every spy story is the spy, the man whom every woman wants and all men envy, an ultimate secret agent man, whose cool good looks, suave manner, superbly tailored dinner jacket, swift cars and gorgeous women put the escape in escapist fiction.Trust William Safire to pull-off the impossible: to pen a palpitating spy novel, the hero of which is not a spy at all, but a journalist and a nasty, frumpy old fellow at that.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 5, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Have I got a spy story for you. It takes place just before the Iraq war. It reads like a thriller, except you can't believe the spooks in the story could be so clumsy. The most hair-raising chapter tells the tale of a defector named Curveball, who duped the United States into believing that Iraq had mobile germ-warfare labs. The saddest part of the tale is that it's all true. I refer to Thursday's report by the presidential commission that has been examining the ability of U.S. spy agencies to find foreign weapons of mass destruction.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 22, 1996
"The English Patient" plunges one into the heart of radiance: It's a heat that can maim cruelly, as applied to flesh; or it's a heat that can heal, also as applied to flesh, but necessarily involving someone else's flesh as well.Those are the possibilities covered by the film, which is another way of saying its possibilities encompass the whole world, as well as the entire metaphorical spectrum of fire. A love story, a spy story, a war story, an airplane story, a desert story, even a bomb-disposal story (and a damn good one!
FEATURES
By Paul Galloway and Paul Galloway,Chicago Tribune | December 27, 1990
TULSA, Okla. -- He rarely leaves the 19th century farmhouse he shares with his second wife and the youngest of four sons atop a wind-swept cliff on the rugged Cornish coast at the southwestern tip of England, and when he does, it's usually to visit his London residence.If he ventures farther, it's often to a European capital or an international trouble spot, a Moscow or a Beirut perhaps, to gather material for his next novel. You wouldn't expect to find John le Carre in this beautiful city of almost 400,000 in the verdant hills of eastern Oklahoma.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | June 10, 2007
BREACH -- Universal / 29.98 A key question of post-Sept. 11 life - "Whom can you trust?" - receives quietly horrifying treatment in Breach, the real-life tale of an espionage case that unfolded early in 2001 and that would have dominated headlines for many months had it not been for Sept. 11. Robert Hanssen spent 22 of his 25 years in the FBI divulging secrets to the U.S.S.R. and then to the new Russia. He passed along the names of KGB agents on the U.S. payroll as well as emergency protocols for relocating the president.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | February 11, 2001
Clark Johnson lived in Baltimore part of each year from 1993 to 1999 while "Homicide" was filming. Here are some memories of the city and show: "I had some great friendships there, and it was a really great place to live. Baltimore was such a character in the show itself. I lived right down in Fells Point, I had my little sailboat there, and my kids were comfortable there. And I'm from Philly, so it was right nearby. I loved it." Johnson's first directing job for "Homicide" was a particularly obscure spy story featuring Terry Kinney from "Oz."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Correspondent | February 8, 1992
LA LECHERE, France -- The former Soviet sports machine -- diminished and sputtering -- may be demolished by 1993.International Olympic Committee president Juan Antonio Samaranch announced yesterday that the states of the former Soviet Union would "probably" compete under their own flags beginning next year."
FEATURES
By Pia Farrell and Pia Farrell,The Hollywood Reporter | April 22, 1994
John Waters' "Serial Mom" has been chosen as the closing night film for this year's Cannes Film Festival, being held in France May 12-22."This is wonderful," Mr. Waters said from his Baltimore office yesterday. "I'm excited, are you kidding? Closing night, with black tie and the whole thing, this is a big deal. I'm thrilled."I'll be going, and Kathleen (Turner, star of 'Serial Mom') will be there too. You know, she's the type of star they just love over there. It'll be great.""Serial Mom" did not, however, win a berth in Cannes' highly prized official competition.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 22, 1996
"The English Patient" plunges one into the heart of radiance: It's a heat that can maim cruelly, as applied to flesh; or it's a heat that can heal, also as applied to flesh, but necessarily involving someone else's flesh as well.Those are the possibilities covered by the film, which is another way of saying its possibilities encompass the whole world, as well as the entire metaphorical spectrum of fire. A love story, a spy story, a war story, an airplane story, a desert story, even a bomb-disposal story (and a damn good one!
NEWS
By MAGGIE GALLAGHER and MAGGIE GALLAGHER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
"Sleeper Spy," by William Safire. New York: Random House. 451 pages. $24 Where James Bond led the way, almost every spy thriller has followed: At the center of every spy story is the spy, the man whom every woman wants and all men envy, an ultimate secret agent man, whose cool good looks, suave manner, superbly tailored dinner jacket, swift cars and gorgeous women put the escape in escapist fiction.Trust William Safire to pull-off the impossible: to pen a palpitating spy novel, the hero of which is not a spy at all, but a journalist and a nasty, frumpy old fellow at that.
FEATURES
By Paul Galloway and Paul Galloway,Chicago Tribune | December 27, 1990
TULSA, Okla. -- He rarely leaves the 19th century farmhouse he shares with his second wife and the youngest of four sons atop a wind-swept cliff on the rugged Cornish coast at the southwestern tip of England, and when he does, it's usually to visit his London residence.If he ventures farther, it's often to a European capital or an international trouble spot, a Moscow or a Beirut perhaps, to gather material for his next novel. You wouldn't expect to find John le Carre in this beautiful city of almost 400,000 in the verdant hills of eastern Oklahoma.
NEWS
By JEFF STEIN | June 23, 1993
Fredericksburg, Virginia. -- The same day President Clinton faced a chorus of hecklers at the Vietnam War Memorial, I happened to be packing away cases of old books and files on Vietnam. As the president spoke, I began leafing through a few volumes, and hours later I was still sitting on the floor amid a growing pile.As it turns out, the material was a timely reminder of what seems largely forgotten in the ongoing story of President Clinton's difficulty with the armed forces: How few GIs actually saw combat in the war they knock Bill Clinton for avoiding.
NEWS
By Jeff Stein | December 3, 1995
THE NEWS THAT the Pentagon wants to horn in on the CIA's spying turf made me laugh.It was over 25 years ago that I got my feet wet in the spook trade, via the U.S. Army Intelligence Corps in Vietnam. I might've made it a career, but it was all downhill from the first night I tried to pass myself off as something I wasn't.Hauled off to a cocktail party at the U.S. consulate, I was feverishly trying to memorize my "cover" as a civilian Pentagon refugee official when a senior South Vietnamese officer sidled up to me and asked, "So what do you do?"
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