Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpy Satellites
IN THE NEWS

Spy Satellites

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 23, 1992
At least three countries are seeking to buy spy satellites in the United States. The requests, government experts say, have set off a high-level rift and a policy review within the government that will probably have to be resolved by the Clinton White House.It is a watershed, analysts say, that the government is even considering permits to sell such high-tech surveillance craft, which can cost a billion dollars and have been cloaked in the highest secrecy ever since their debut 32 years ago. Several people are now in jail just because they leaked information about such satellites or data gathered by them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Frank D. Roylance and Dennis O'Brien and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporters | February 21, 2008
A missile launched from a Navy ship struck a dying U.S. spy satellite passing 130 miles over the Pacific Ocean yesterday, the Pentagon said. A Defense Department official said an initial view of the missile strike on the spy satellite indicated that it probably hit the spacecraft's fuel tank, whose toxic contents were the main target of the missile launch, the Associated Press reported. "Due to the relatively low altitude of the satellite at the time of the engagement, debris will begin to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere immediately," the Pentagon said in a news release last night.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 10, 1997
Commercial spy satellites are about to let anyone with a credit card peer down from the heavens into the compounds of dictators or the back yards of neighbors with high fences.The first satellite is scheduled to fly into orbit in April or May, another in December and perhaps a dozen during the next decade. The launchings will end a monopoly that advanced nations held for nearly four decades on orbital espionage.Rivaling military spy craft in the sharpness of their photos, the new American-made satellites are designed to see objects as small as a yard or so in diameter -- cars and hot tubs, for example.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 11, 2007
By May 2002, the government's effort to build a technologically audacious new generation of spy satellites was foundering. The contractor building the satellites, Boeing, was still giving Washington reassuring progress reports. But the program was threatening to outstrip its $5 billion budget, and pivotal parts of the design seemed increasingly unworkable. Peter B. Teets, the new head of the nation's spy satellite agency, appointed a panel of experts to examine the secret project, telling them, according to one member, "Find out what's going on; find the terrible truth I suspect is out there."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- For 40 years, Pete Wilhelm wasn't allowed to tell anyone the real story behind the work he did at the Naval Research Laboratory.His cover story was that he was helping to launch a satellite that would measure solar radiation. In fact, the satellite's real target was the Soviet Union.In 1959, Wilhelm belonged to a team developing the nation's first spy satellite, GRAB (galactic radiation and background), whose existence was acknowledged for the first time yesterday at a news conference at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - U.S. spy satellites over North Korea have detected what appear to be trucks moving the country's stockpile of 8,000 nuclear fuel rods out of storage, prompting fears within the administration that the country is preparing to produce roughly a half-dozen nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said yesterday. Throughout January, intelligence analysts have seen extensive activity at the Yongbyon nuclear complex, with some trucks pulling up to the building housing the storage pond. While the satellites could not see exactly what was being put into the trucks, analysts concluded that workers likely were transporting the rods, either to get them out of the sight of U.S. intelligence officials or to a nuclear reprocessing facility several miles away, where they could be converted into bomb-grade plutonium.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
CHANTILLY, Va. - From across Route 28, amid acres of business parks and grassy islands, rises a series of dazzling light blue buildings that look nothing like a government office complex. But that is the point. Behind the gridiron gates and armed guards is the National Reconnaissance Office, possibly the most secret agency in government, one that has long escaped the scrutiny and notoriety of its counterparts at the FBI, CIA and the National Security Agency. For 40 years, the NRO has designed, built and operated the nation's spy satellites.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Millions of top-secret spy satellite photographs will be released under an order President Clinton is expected to sign in coming weeks, providing an information windfall that could help determine the extent to which oceans are fouled, deserts are expanding and rain forests are disappearing.If Mr. Clinton approves the long-standing but controversial proposal, the government will declassify all the satellite photographs taken from 1960 to 1972 and provide scientists with an unprecedented historical record of what the Earth looked like 35 years ago.The photographs were taken by six generations of early spy satellites, starting with the still secret Keyhole 1, an Air Force satellite.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 4, 1998
MIAMI -- The Soviet Union knew U.S. battle plans in the Persian Gulf war in 1991, including the surprise "left hook" into Iraq, through an electronic spy network anchored in Cuba, a Russian defector says.Moscow did not leak the plans to Baghdad at the time, the defector said. But improved Russian-Iraqi relations these days may lead Moscow to be more friendly to President Saddam Hussein if U.S. troops plan to attack Iraq again.Moscow's Lourdes spy center in Cuba is far bigger than publicly known, the defector added, a "monster" that collates data intercepted by Russian spy satellites, ships and planes in the entire Atlantic region.
NEWS
March 30, 2003
A NEW MYSTERY novel set in Japan describes the island shedding its post-World War II pacifism and developing its own nuclear arms. The book is titled Project Kaisei, and Kaisei can mean "amendment" - a suspected reference to amending the nation's constitutional commitment to nonaggression. The premise is hardly science fiction. With North Korea threatening to go nuclear - and the United States so far not mustering sufficient regional unity to forestall that - long-simmering pressures within Japan for strengthening its military are gaining currency.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
Should have seen this one coming. Once the federal government had rationalized its authority to violate the privacy of Americans by tapping their phones, reading their e-mail, surveying their library selections and poking through their bank records, it was only a matter of time before the Department of Homeland Security would point spy satellite cameras intended for foreign enemies into the private lives of Americans as well. Indeed, the country is becoming so inured to the Big Brother tactics of the Bush administration, news of this intrusive new eye in domestic skies has provoked little outrage.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - A highly classified intelligence program that the Senate Intelligence Committee has tried unsuccessfully to kill is a new $9.5 billion spy satellite system that could take photographs only in daylight hours and in clear weather, current and former government officials say. The cost of the system, now the single biggest item in the intelligence budget, and doubts about its usefulness have spurred a secret congressional battle, which first...
NEWS
March 30, 2003
A NEW MYSTERY novel set in Japan describes the island shedding its post-World War II pacifism and developing its own nuclear arms. The book is titled Project Kaisei, and Kaisei can mean "amendment" - a suspected reference to amending the nation's constitutional commitment to nonaggression. The premise is hardly science fiction. With North Korea threatening to go nuclear - and the United States so far not mustering sufficient regional unity to forestall that - long-simmering pressures within Japan for strengthening its military are gaining currency.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration's experts on North Korea and intelligence officials have told President Bush that they expect that in the next few weeks the North will turn on the reprocessing facility that can produce weapons-grade plutonium. The officials say they believe that North Korea might time the bomb-making to coincide with the start of any military action against Iraq, a moment when North Korea may think that the United States is distracted. Spy satellites, which show a steady stream of activity around the reprocessing plant, detected a test last month of the power system that would have to be activated before the country's stockpile of 8,000 spent nuclear fuel rods could be turned into plutonium, according to several officials with access to the intelligence.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - U.S. spy satellites over North Korea have detected what appear to be trucks moving the country's stockpile of 8,000 nuclear fuel rods out of storage, prompting fears within the administration that the country is preparing to produce roughly a half-dozen nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said yesterday. Throughout January, intelligence analysts have seen extensive activity at the Yongbyon nuclear complex, with some trucks pulling up to the building housing the storage pond. While the satellites could not see exactly what was being put into the trucks, analysts concluded that workers likely were transporting the rods, either to get them out of the sight of U.S. intelligence officials or to a nuclear reprocessing facility several miles away, where they could be converted into bomb-grade plutonium.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 28, 2003
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - Federal prosecutors began laying out their case yesterday in the espionage trial of Brian P. Regan of Bowie, who, if convicted, could become the first person in the United States to be executed for spying in a half-century. In their opening remarks, the prosecutors depicted Regan as a calculating would-be spy who was willing to put his country at grave risk to pay off personal credit card debt. They charged that he had offered secret information to Iraq - to help it hide anti-aircraft missiles - and to Libya and China.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton called Iraq's bluff on the Kuwaiti border with the help of a fleet of U.S. spy satellites even bigger and sharper-eyed than those President George Bush depended on four years ago.Six satellites -- two more than Mr. Bush had -- now soar over Iraq twice a day, probing the earth through sunlight, darkness and clouds.Last week, they beamed back detailed images that convinced the United Nations that Iraqi forces were moving south again. This week, they may help to settle doubts about whether the troops are really pulling back to the north or simply repositioning.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
Should have seen this one coming. Once the federal government had rationalized its authority to violate the privacy of Americans by tapping their phones, reading their e-mail, surveying their library selections and poking through their bank records, it was only a matter of time before the Department of Homeland Security would point spy satellite cameras intended for foreign enemies into the private lives of Americans as well. Indeed, the country is becoming so inured to the Big Brother tactics of the Bush administration, news of this intrusive new eye in domestic skies has provoked little outrage.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
CHANTILLY, Va. - From across Route 28, amid acres of business parks and grassy islands, rises a series of dazzling light blue buildings that look nothing like a government office complex. But that is the point. Behind the gridiron gates and armed guards is the National Reconnaissance Office, possibly the most secret agency in government, one that has long escaped the scrutiny and notoriety of its counterparts at the FBI, CIA and the National Security Agency. For 40 years, the NRO has designed, built and operated the nation's spy satellites.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence analysts have discovered evidence that South Korea is trying to develop longer-range ballistic missiles while keeping some of the program's key aims secret from Washington, U.S. officials say. U.S. spy satellites detected fresh evidence of the program's extent last year, and U.S. concerns intensified after a missile test this year, the officials said. The United States, South Korea's closest ally, has been tracking its missile research carefully for years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.