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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 25, 2003
Spy Kids 3D: Game Over tries to make up in gimmickry what its predecessors had in spirit, with negligible results. Mining the same vein that fed his first two Spy Kids films, writer-director Robert Rodriguez once again offers a paean to family by chronicling the exploits of those intrepid Cortez kids, America's youngest secret agents. Once again, the kids succeed in their mission, but only with the timely assistance of family members (in this movie, however, family is stretched to include everyone)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 10, 2005
Writer-director Robert Rodriguez's The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D, presented as "A Rodriguez Family Movie Based on the Stories and Dreams of Racer Max" (his 7-year-old son), is as sweet and hopeless and silly as a doting dad framing his second-grader's latest finger-painting and calling it a Matisse. A tale of a boy fantasist who discovers his imaginary superhero friends are real, it is no more amusing or compelling than a visit to a distant cousin's rumpus room. Rodriguez showed a gift for rough-and-ready, quick-witted family fare in his first Spy Kids movie; it wrought more funny twists on the "family that slays together, stays together" formula than today's semi-adult opening, Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
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FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 30, 2001
`Spy Kids' Rated PG Sun score: ** "Spy Kids" is about a pair of kids with surprisingly cool parents and lots of cool gizmos, who go on some really cool adventures. Problem is, the movie's not nearly as cool as the setup. Oh sure, really young children might enjoy it. But here's betting older kids, those raised on "Star Wars"-caliber special effects, who expect movies with action and exciting stories, are going to find this effort wanting. And adults aren't going to be roped in either, not even by a wholesome ending that feels like it was grafted on at the last minute in one last effort to make a film the whole family can not only see but also embrace.
NEWS
June 27, 2004
TownMall to feature sidewalk sale, Kid's Club TownMall of Westminster, has announced activities for next month. The annual summer sidewalk sale will be held Thursday to July 5. Participating merchants will offer holiday specials. The Kid's Club is held at 9:30 a.m. every Wednesday, with Tracy Eldridge on July 7, O'Susannah on July 14, Anthony Ware Magic on July 21 and a surprise July 28. The Psycho Jammers Swing Club will perform from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. July 9 in front of Steve and Barry's University Sportswear.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 7, 2002
The sequel to a special-effects franchise as big as Spy Kids can take two or three years to get from drawing-board to screen. But writer-director-editor Robert Rodriguez has delivered Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams in a mere 17 months. The birth is premature, and the defects are clear. The picture's physical growth outdistances its mental development. It lurches clumsily from one slapdash climax to another. In the original Spy Kids, Rodriguez devised a Bond movie about family bonds, with Antonio Banderas and Carla Gugino as married former secret agents Gregorio and Ingrid Cortez, who emerged from retirement to save a colleague and were captured themselves - paving the way for the rescue-team heroics of their own grade-school son and daughter, Juni and Carmen (Daryl Sabara and Alexa Vega)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 8, 2001
I can't tell whether the addition of a droll and scary underwater scene significantly changes Spy Kids, because I missed the March premiere of the original edition. I can say this: no other PG movie in the year 2001 - and no G, PG-13, or R-rated picture either - has topped this excellent adventure for ebullience and inventive wit. Remember how once upon a time everyone yearned for the Bond franchise to renew itself with a marriage between 007 and Diana Rigg? Director Robert Rodriguez has devised a Bond movie about family bonds, and it's more fun than any bona fide adult Bond movie since The Spy Who Loved Me. The bonding and the Bondage mesh seamlessly: The movie had me thinking merrily back to old Mad magazine mock-advertising slogans - like "the family that slays together, stays together."
FEATURES
By Terry Armour and Terry Armour,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2002
CHICAGO - Filmmaker Robert Rodriguez grins as he settles into a chair at a long table in a room at the Chicago Children's Museum. He is reminded of his childhood days as a second-grader in San Antonio. "They would tell us to clear our desks and take out the art paper - today you can draw anything you want," he reminisces. "I remember one time, my friend Chris Vasquez was drawing a car and I was drawing a dinosaur-cavemen fight. The cavemen were losing - there was one hanging out of the dinosaur's mouth.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 10, 2005
Writer-director Robert Rodriguez's The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D, presented as "A Rodriguez Family Movie Based on the Stories and Dreams of Racer Max" (his 7-year-old son), is as sweet and hopeless and silly as a doting dad framing his second-grader's latest finger-painting and calling it a Matisse. A tale of a boy fantasist who discovers his imaginary superhero friends are real, it is no more amusing or compelling than a visit to a distant cousin's rumpus room. Rodriguez showed a gift for rough-and-ready, quick-witted family fare in his first Spy Kids movie; it wrought more funny twists on the "family that slays together, stays together" formula than today's semi-adult opening, Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
NEWS
June 27, 2004
TownMall to feature sidewalk sale, Kid's Club TownMall of Westminster, has announced activities for next month. The annual summer sidewalk sale will be held Thursday to July 5. Participating merchants will offer holiday specials. The Kid's Club is held at 9:30 a.m. every Wednesday, with Tracy Eldridge on July 7, O'Susannah on July 14, Anthony Ware Magic on July 21 and a surprise July 28. The Psycho Jammers Swing Club will perform from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. July 9 in front of Steve and Barry's University Sportswear.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
From Beijing to your local cineplex, spies and espionage are big right now. Only one organization had the intelligence capabilities (not to mention James Bond-like luck) to see this coming: the toy industry. Been inside your neighborhood toy store lately? There's no shortage of spy-spawned toys on the shelf -- from micro-cameras and fingerprint kits to eavesdropping microphones and code books. Until a few months ago, they might have looked like charming anachronisms in the post-Cold War era. But that was before veteran FBI agent Robert Hanssen was accused of being a Russian spy, or 50 Russian diplomats were kicked out of the U.S., or a Navy surveillance plane with 24 Americans on board was held by the Chinese.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 25, 2003
Spy Kids 3D: Game Over tries to make up in gimmickry what its predecessors had in spirit, with negligible results. Mining the same vein that fed his first two Spy Kids films, writer-director Robert Rodriguez once again offers a paean to family by chronicling the exploits of those intrepid Cortez kids, America's youngest secret agents. Once again, the kids succeed in their mission, but only with the timely assistance of family members (in this movie, however, family is stretched to include everyone)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 7, 2002
The sequel to a special-effects franchise as big as Spy Kids can take two or three years to get from drawing-board to screen. But writer-director-editor Robert Rodriguez has delivered Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams in a mere 17 months. The birth is premature, and the defects are clear. The picture's physical growth outdistances its mental development. It lurches clumsily from one slapdash climax to another. In the original Spy Kids, Rodriguez devised a Bond movie about family bonds, with Antonio Banderas and Carla Gugino as married former secret agents Gregorio and Ingrid Cortez, who emerged from retirement to save a colleague and were captured themselves - paving the way for the rescue-team heroics of their own grade-school son and daughter, Juni and Carmen (Daryl Sabara and Alexa Vega)
FEATURES
By Terry Armour and Terry Armour,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2002
CHICAGO - Filmmaker Robert Rodriguez grins as he settles into a chair at a long table in a room at the Chicago Children's Museum. He is reminded of his childhood days as a second-grader in San Antonio. "They would tell us to clear our desks and take out the art paper - today you can draw anything you want," he reminisces. "I remember one time, my friend Chris Vasquez was drawing a car and I was drawing a dinosaur-cavemen fight. The cavemen were losing - there was one hanging out of the dinosaur's mouth.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 8, 2001
I can't tell whether the addition of a droll and scary underwater scene significantly changes Spy Kids, because I missed the March premiere of the original edition. I can say this: no other PG movie in the year 2001 - and no G, PG-13, or R-rated picture either - has topped this excellent adventure for ebullience and inventive wit. Remember how once upon a time everyone yearned for the Bond franchise to renew itself with a marriage between 007 and Diana Rigg? Director Robert Rodriguez has devised a Bond movie about family bonds, and it's more fun than any bona fide adult Bond movie since The Spy Who Loved Me. The bonding and the Bondage mesh seamlessly: The movie had me thinking merrily back to old Mad magazine mock-advertising slogans - like "the family that slays together, stays together."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
From Beijing to your local cineplex, spies and espionage are big right now. Only one organization had the intelligence capabilities (not to mention James Bond-like luck) to see this coming: the toy industry. Been inside your neighborhood toy store lately? There's no shortage of spy-spawned toys on the shelf -- from micro-cameras and fingerprint kits to eavesdropping microphones and code books. Until a few months ago, they might have looked like charming anachronisms in the post-Cold War era. But that was before veteran FBI agent Robert Hanssen was accused of being a Russian spy, or 50 Russian diplomats were kicked out of the U.S., or a Navy surveillance plane with 24 Americans on board was held by the Chinese.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 30, 2001
`Spy Kids' Rated PG Sun score: ** "Spy Kids" is about a pair of kids with surprisingly cool parents and lots of cool gizmos, who go on some really cool adventures. Problem is, the movie's not nearly as cool as the setup. Oh sure, really young children might enjoy it. But here's betting older kids, those raised on "Star Wars"-caliber special effects, who expect movies with action and exciting stories, are going to find this effort wanting. And adults aren't going to be roped in either, not even by a wholesome ending that feels like it was grafted on at the last minute in one last effort to make a film the whole family can not only see but also embrace.
FEATURES
May 23, 2001
The top films at the box office over the weekend, with distributor, weekend gross, total gross, number of weeks in release: 1 "Shrek"................................. DreamWorks.....$42.3 million..... $42.3 million...1 2 "The Mummy Returns".... Universal............$20.4 million.....$146.5 million.. 3 3 "A Knight's Tale"............... Sony.................. $10.4 million...... $31.8 million... 2 4 "Angel Eyes"...................... Warner Bros........$9.2 million........ $9.2 million.
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