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By MIKE KLINGAMAN | March 6, 1994
I dropped by the garden center yesterday on the pretext of visiting Compost the cat.Compost is a big old tom, a major-league mouser who patrols the place with pride. Scratch his head and he melts in your lap, purring louder than a rototiller.I enjoy seeing Compost, yet he's only an excuse to drop by the store. I have an ulterior motive.I'm really here to check out the spuds.Potatoes are among my favorite vegetables; I can't wait to plant them in spring. Most garden centers sell seed potatoes, so I stake out the place early, in hopes of getting first dibs upon the crop's arrival -- from the northwest, I guess.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Check out this Travel & Leisure round-up of the best french fries in the U.S. There's Thrasher's! "It's hard to beat a bucket of hand-cut spuds that have been fried in peanut oil with skins on," the blurb says, "especially when served with nothing more than a little salt and vinegar. "
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FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 8, 1998
Item: Simply PotatoesServings per package: about 4Cost: $2.59Preparation time: 4 minutes in microwave, 15 minutes to 30 minutes in conventional oven, depending on quantity used.Review: You want mashed potatoes in an instant? This version, in a refrigerated tray, is for you. You'd be hard-pressed to tap an easier source for the many-splendored spud. Tear back the plastic on top, shove the tray into the microwave, nuke it on high for 3 minutes. Then add a touch of margarine and stir, and nuke for another minute.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2009
Virginia Cox of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making sweet potato candy, sometimes also known as cinnamon logs. Anna Wilkinson, also of Baltimore, sent in her recipe for this "melt in your mouth" candy. I was somewhat surprised to discover that her recipe contained no actual sweet potato at all. As it turns out, they are called sweet potato candy because of their appearance. After the candies are shaped and rolled in cinnamon they resemble little sweet potatoes. I found that the candies were fairly easy to make.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 11, 1993
Spuds MacKenzie is dead. And now, inevitably, things will start to get ugly.You'll learn "the truth" about Spuds.The tabloids -- print and television, both -- will be all over this one, like fleas on a hound. People magazine will tell you that Spuds spent a few wonderful months with the late Raymond Burr and try to make it sound like something dirty.The sleazemeisters wait until the great ones are dead, and then they feed off them.It makes me ashamed when we're talking about what I think we can all agree was a great American dog. Tell me whose life wasn't made better by having known this pooch?
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
You say po-tat-o. I say a-troc-ity. Nothing strikes a sour note during a holiday dinner quite like a bowl of bad mashed potatoes. You know the kind - gummy or lumpy or runny or dry and thick as library paste and flavored a bit like it, too. When made correctly, mashed potatoes are the ultimate comfort food, warm, buttery, tasty and the perfect complement to Thanksgiving's roast turkey - a consensus pick for a holiday must-have. Creamy and rich, lump-free and soft (but still able to hold their shape)
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Check out this Travel & Leisure round-up of the best french fries in the U.S. There's Thrasher's! "It's hard to beat a bucket of hand-cut spuds that have been fried in peanut oil with skins on," the blurb says, "especially when served with nothing more than a little salt and vinegar. "
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | November 29, 1993
New Orleans. -- First, Michael Jordan retired. Then Spuds McKenzie died. The hoop star and the beer-drinking mutt left millions bereft.I know how the masses feel. When I was living in Baltimore I woke up one morning to find the football team missing. Turns out the Baltimore Colts, as those perennial losers were then called, had packed in the middle of the night and skipped town. The disoriented population was too stunned to even riot, though there were many calls to set fire to City Hall.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | September 6, 1992
One potato, two potatoes, three potatoes, four,If I dig a little deeper I may find a couple more.Five potatoes, six potatoes, seven potatoes, eight,Any way you spell it, a fresh potato(e) tastes great.--Not Dan QuayleGrab a shovel and get out the sour cream, it's time to harvest the spuds.Digging the garden by hand is no fun, but for potatoes I'll make an exception. Each shovelful of dirt reveals more potatoes, fat brown lumps destined for a 400-degree oven. Baked, home-grown taters highlight any meal, unlike their humdrum store-bought kin. Their skins are rich, crisp and laced with none of the chemicals found in most supermarket varieties.
SPORTS
April 1, 1994
Sid FernandezBorn in Hawaii and still resides there in the off-season. Is of Portuguese descent. . . . Wears No. 50, as in 50th state. . . . On the quiet side but does flash a sense of humor at times. Showed that side in spring training when he signed some autographs "Don Ho." . . . Enjoys scuba diving and used to be a surfer. Gave up the latter hobby after a close call with a wave. . . . Had nickname "El Sid" during years with Mets.Rafael PalmeiroGrew up near Miami Stadium and watched Orioles spring training workouts.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,Chicago Tribune | May 21, 2008
Unlike crab cakes, which taste best when you limit the cracker or bread filler, these fish cakes benefit from such additions to add texture. My fish cakes also always include diced onion, green pepper and celery. Then I flavor the little cakes with other appropriate ingredients (often leftovers) from my refrigerator and pantry. Leftover mashed potatoes added a creamy texture to cakes I made recently from coarsely chopped sole fillets. Pair these fish cakes with a California pinot grigio.
NEWS
By Gholam Rahman and Gholam Rahman,Cox News Service | January 10, 2007
I boiled some red new potatoes for a salad dish, but the potatoes lost their color and came out rather dull gray. What was the reason? Did I do something wrong? Preserving or enhancing the color of foods we cook, particularly vegetables, is one of the holy grails of both home and professional cooks. Creating a dish that evokes voila! and wow! requires the happy convergence of many factors, including the heat, the quality of the cooking medium such as water, the utensils, the ingredients and even the weather.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,[Sun reporter] | November 22, 2006
Chances are that if you're hosting a Thanksgiving meal tomorrow, you'll be mashing potatoes. What sounds like a simple, traditional task actually requires a fair amount of decision-making. Do you want your tubers smooth or "smashed"? Peels on or off? Should you mash by hand or use a mixer or food processor? Baltimore International College chef instructor Greg Wentz says you should start by choosing the right potatoes. The higher the starch, the better they mash, he says, so look for russets, Yukon golds or fingerling potatoes if you want a smooth finish.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 26, 2006
Which potato makes the best mashed potatoes? Yukon golds or russets? In On Cooking: Techniques From Expert Chefs, a reference book often used in culinary schools, the authors call for waxy potatoes. In The America's Test Kitchen Cookbook, from the editors of Cook's Illustrated magazine, the authors cite the assets of both. "Russet potatoes make fluffier mashed potatoes," they write. "But Yukon golds have an appealing buttery flavor." So we weren't surprised when our own unofficial tasting yielded much the same results.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
Who needs steak? A baked potato loaded with all the right fixings is a far cry from a lowly side dish -- it's a meal in itself. We ordered spuds from four restaurants around the city, and they varied from place to place. Here are the results. Capital Grille 500 E. Pratt St. 443-703-4064 Hours --11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday This monster of a baked potato, $6.25, is big enough to swallow a butter knife.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
You say po-tat-o. I say a-troc-ity. Nothing strikes a sour note during a holiday dinner quite like a bowl of bad mashed potatoes. You know the kind - gummy or lumpy or runny or dry and thick as library paste and flavored a bit like it, too. When made correctly, mashed potatoes are the ultimate comfort food, warm, buttery, tasty and the perfect complement to Thanksgiving's roast turkey - a consensus pick for a holiday must-have. Creamy and rich, lump-free and soft (but still able to hold their shape)
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | March 18, 2001
I COME TO PRAISE the potato, not bury it. I have long been a fan of the cooked potato. I like it mashed and mixed with celery root. I liked it sliced and sizzled in hot peanut oil, a process that yields one of the world's greatest and messiest treats -- homemade potato chips. I crave baked potatoes on Sundays, fried potatoes on Fridays and crisp potato salad on summer afternoons. Every year around St. Patrick's Day, I try to talk myself into planting potatoes in my garden. Yet each year I say "No."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | July 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- When lawmakers return from their Independence Day recess next week, they'll find some political hot potatoes waiting for them.Among the smoldering spuds -- a proposed pay raise for federal workers. The size of the pay raise for the next fiscal year is in dispute on Capitol Hill, where a decision is expected once Congress reconvenes July 11.Debate over the raise has been heated, with the House approving a much higher raise than the Senate. The House would boost salaries 2.6 percent, while the Senate would raise pay by 1.6 percent.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
Anna F. DeLattre of Ebensburg, Pa., wrote: "When we were all liv ing at home, my mother made the best dressing for her potato salad. It somehow got misplaced, and no one in the family can remember how she made it. We do know she cooked it, and that's about all. I sure would appreciate if one of your readers have it." Francis Rahl of Baltimore responded. He wrote: "This recipe requested by Anna DeLattre could be that used by both my mother and my wife's mother in western Pennsylvania in the first half of the last century.
NEWS
By Cynthia Glover and Cynthia Glover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2002
The book's name, Potato Salad, is simple enough. It's the subtitle that tells the story: Fifty Favorite Recipes. Most of us would be hard-pressed to think up a handful of ways to get our spuds to the table in salad form. But here are 50, each sounding more tasty than the last. There are the basics, of course, like a classic Southern potato salad and a Nuremberg version, which most of us know as German. But then author Barbara Lauterbach's net widens to encompass a rich haul gleaned from friends, restaurateurs and her own imagination.
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