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NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - Magnetic field measurements by a German researcher and analyses by a Duke University engineer explain how dual electrical discharges associated with high-altitude lightning can sometimes be separated by unusually long intervals of one-tenth of a second or more. The studies show that strong cloud-to-ground electrical currents can persist between the first and the follow-up discharges, maintaining enough energy flow for the second burst to trigger a sprite -the faint, colorful and exceedingly brief flashes that are now known to erupt high in Earth's atmosphere in a region just below the ionosphere, which begins at an altitude of about 50 miles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | September 10, 2013
Ah, the Crush. It's a time-tested cash cow, combining freshly squeezed fruit juice with fruity fruit flavored vodka and more fruit-flavored accoutrements. But what if society decided to flip the script on the old Crusharoonie and give it what it needs - a much belated upgrade? Quigley's Half Irish Pub has something to fit the bill: the Irish Crush. It's a traditional Orange Crush at its core: freshly squeezed orange juice, triple sec and Sprite, but with a very important substitution - Jameson instead of any manner of vodka.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 15, 1997
ATLANTA -- Coca-Cola Co.'s first-quarter earnings rose 11 percent as sales of Sprite gave Coke its fastest rate of growth in North America in at least five years, the company reported yesterday.The soft-drink maker's profit from operations rose to $789 million, or 32 cents a share, from $713 million, or 28 cents, in the year-earlier period.Coke spent heavily on advertising and introduced several products around the world, winning sales at the expense of rival PepsiCo Inc. In the United States, Coke's sales are rising two to three times the industry's average.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | July 9, 2013
Canton's Plug Ugly's Publick House is named after an obscure band of ruffians used to control election day polling by politicians. They had a brief existence in the 1850s and are rumored to have kidnapped Edgar Allan Poe for political machinations leading to his untimely demise. An interesting namesake, to be sure. Given that, obviously they should have a pirate-themed rum infusion, right? Of course. The name is Pirate Juice, a secret blend of seven different rums (and no, my palate isn't sophisticated enough to discern which ones)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | July 9, 2013
Canton's Plug Ugly's Publick House is named after an obscure band of ruffians used to control election day polling by politicians. They had a brief existence in the 1850s and are rumored to have kidnapped Edgar Allan Poe for political machinations leading to his untimely demise. An interesting namesake, to be sure. Given that, obviously they should have a pirate-themed rum infusion, right? Of course. The name is Pirate Juice, a secret blend of seven different rums (and no, my palate isn't sophisticated enough to discern which ones)
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | March 27, 1992
Struggling with declining ticket sales and spiraling production costs, Hollywood studios are turning to new, often less expensive ways of luring moviegoers.Increasingly, they are reaching out to viewers via direct-mail campaigns, advertising aimed at specialized groups and marketing partnerships with consumer-product giants such as McDonald's and Coca-Cola.For example:* The promotional effort for the Kevin Costner film "Dances with Wolves" concentrated on one of its target audiences -- American Indians -- with radio advertisements in several American Indian languages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | April 24, 2012
One of the Inner Harbor's seafood institutions with the greatest waterviews in the city, the Rusty Scupper, is celebrating its 30th anniversary in business. The War of 1812 bicentennial also begins this summer, so the folks at the Scupper decided to give its looming neighbor, Federal Hill, its own drink: the Federal Hill Martini. A blend of VeeV Acai, Chambord and sour mix with a splash of Sprite, the cocktail is essentially a margarita served in a martini glass (it's also available over ice and with salt, natch)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | September 10, 2013
Ah, the Crush. It's a time-tested cash cow, combining freshly squeezed fruit juice with fruity fruit flavored vodka and more fruit-flavored accoutrements. But what if society decided to flip the script on the old Crusharoonie and give it what it needs - a much belated upgrade? Quigley's Half Irish Pub has something to fit the bill: the Irish Crush. It's a traditional Orange Crush at its core: freshly squeezed orange juice, triple sec and Sprite, but with a very important substitution - Jameson instead of any manner of vodka.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 6, 1995
Rock stars rarely improve with age. Some do, of course, but most end up offering increasingly threadbare variations on what they did in their youth. Whether it's Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis or Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney, the story remains the same; read between the lines of even the most favorable reviews, and what you'll find isn't "this is the best they've ever been" but just "not bad for old guys."By rights, Rod Stewart ought to be at the head of that class. His slide began almost two decades ago, and he moved from the pre-fab disco of "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?"
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 21, 1998
In his musical "Into the Woods," Stephen Sondheim contends: "Anything can happen in the woods." That's certainly the case in Shakespeare's pastoral comedy "As You Like It," which is receiving a high-spirited production at Center Stage.Most of what happens in Shakespeare's woods is orchestrated by Rosalind, the character described as "the most admirable personage in all of Shakespeare" by literary critic Harold Bloom in his new book, "Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human."In director Irene Lewis' production, Diana LaMar's admirable Rosalind is giddy and girlish, but determined.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | April 24, 2012
One of the Inner Harbor's seafood institutions with the greatest waterviews in the city, the Rusty Scupper, is celebrating its 30th anniversary in business. The War of 1812 bicentennial also begins this summer, so the folks at the Scupper decided to give its looming neighbor, Federal Hill, its own drink: the Federal Hill Martini. A blend of VeeV Acai, Chambord and sour mix with a splash of Sprite, the cocktail is essentially a margarita served in a martini glass (it's also available over ice and with salt, natch)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Haga, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
If punk rock — in all its various styles and sub-genres — is about being contrarian, Paramore might be the most punk band on the planet. The Tennessee-rooted outfit has been nominated for Grammys, sold millions of albums and plays a sort of teen-friendly pop-punk that's hooky, vivacious and surprisingly wholesome. (The band makes no bones about its Christian faith, but its music isn't overtly religious.) At the center of all the attention — albeit reluctantly — is Hayley Williams, a sprightly front woman well-known for her shock of dyed hair and powerhouse vocals.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - Magnetic field measurements by a German researcher and analyses by a Duke University engineer explain how dual electrical discharges associated with high-altitude lightning can sometimes be separated by unusually long intervals of one-tenth of a second or more. The studies show that strong cloud-to-ground electrical currents can persist between the first and the follow-up discharges, maintaining enough energy flow for the second burst to trigger a sprite -the faint, colorful and exceedingly brief flashes that are now known to erupt high in Earth's atmosphere in a region just below the ionosphere, which begins at an altitude of about 50 miles.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - When you're 14, it's hard to be a symbol of perfection in an imperfect world. But that's what happened in 1976, in Montreal, to Nadia Comaneci. One moment, she was just another stony-faced tumbler from Romania. And in the next, in the blink of a perfect 10 on a scoreboard, she became a star, who owned the Olympics and commanded a chunk of the world's sporting interest. "I didn't feel any pressure because nobody was expecting me to win," she said the other day, nearly a quarter-century after she first commanded the public stage.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 21, 1998
In his musical "Into the Woods," Stephen Sondheim contends: "Anything can happen in the woods." That's certainly the case in Shakespeare's pastoral comedy "As You Like It," which is receiving a high-spirited production at Center Stage.Most of what happens in Shakespeare's woods is orchestrated by Rosalind, the character described as "the most admirable personage in all of Shakespeare" by literary critic Harold Bloom in his new book, "Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human."In director Irene Lewis' production, Diana LaMar's admirable Rosalind is giddy and girlish, but determined.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 15, 1997
ATLANTA -- Coca-Cola Co.'s first-quarter earnings rose 11 percent as sales of Sprite gave Coke its fastest rate of growth in North America in at least five years, the company reported yesterday.The soft-drink maker's profit from operations rose to $789 million, or 32 cents a share, from $713 million, or 28 cents, in the year-earlier period.Coke spent heavily on advertising and introduced several products around the world, winning sales at the expense of rival PepsiCo Inc. In the United States, Coke's sales are rising two to three times the industry's average.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Haga, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
If punk rock — in all its various styles and sub-genres — is about being contrarian, Paramore might be the most punk band on the planet. The Tennessee-rooted outfit has been nominated for Grammys, sold millions of albums and plays a sort of teen-friendly pop-punk that's hooky, vivacious and surprisingly wholesome. (The band makes no bones about its Christian faith, but its music isn't overtly religious.) At the center of all the attention — albeit reluctantly — is Hayley Williams, a sprightly front woman well-known for her shock of dyed hair and powerhouse vocals.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - When you're 14, it's hard to be a symbol of perfection in an imperfect world. But that's what happened in 1976, in Montreal, to Nadia Comaneci. One moment, she was just another stony-faced tumbler from Romania. And in the next, in the blink of a perfect 10 on a scoreboard, she became a star, who owned the Olympics and commanded a chunk of the world's sporting interest. "I didn't feel any pressure because nobody was expecting me to win," she said the other day, nearly a quarter-century after she first commanded the public stage.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 6, 1995
Rock stars rarely improve with age. Some do, of course, but most end up offering increasingly threadbare variations on what they did in their youth. Whether it's Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis or Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney, the story remains the same; read between the lines of even the most favorable reviews, and what you'll find isn't "this is the best they've ever been" but just "not bad for old guys."By rights, Rod Stewart ought to be at the head of that class. His slide began almost two decades ago, and he moved from the pre-fab disco of "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?"
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | March 27, 1992
Struggling with declining ticket sales and spiraling production costs, Hollywood studios are turning to new, often less expensive ways of luring moviegoers.Increasingly, they are reaching out to viewers via direct-mail campaigns, advertising aimed at specialized groups and marketing partnerships with consumer-product giants such as McDonald's and Coca-Cola.For example:* The promotional effort for the Kevin Costner film "Dances with Wolves" concentrated on one of its target audiences -- American Indians -- with radio advertisements in several American Indian languages.
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