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Editorial from The Aegis | April 4, 2013
The heat of summertime is when roaring wildfires are fodder for reports on the national news, but for a few weeks in early spring and mid autumn, the outdoor conditions in northeastern Maryland make this area prone to field and woods fires. Late last week, and earlier this week brush fires were put out in wooded areas in Joppatowne and Fallston. Other fires have kept the volunteer fire service busy, and can be expected to do so for another two or three weeks. In the past, Maryland Forest Service staff have explained that in the springtime, a combination of factors make the outdoors vulnerable to errant sparks.
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By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Do I need to keep weeding in fall? There are only a few little weeds, and wouldn't it be better to spend my time, say, pruning? A weed pulled in time saves nine - or 90. Many summer weeds are now loaded with thousands of seeds. Also, many weeds known as winter annuals start now and will explode with growth in spring. Hairy bittercress is one of these; it's is a tidy rosette now and almost a joy to pull, it's so easy. Because it has no seeds yet, you can throw it on the lawn and chop it up when you mow, adding organic matter to improve your topsoil.
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April 11, 2012
Springtime 50 years ago was alive at the old Aberdeen Elementary School on North Philadelphia Boulevard. The playground (now Festival Park) was filled with children practicing for athletic events and the upcoming May Day. There were violets growing in the same spots where we picked them many years before. Mr. Aaronson's livestock were long gone, but memories of the old farmyard were still very vivid. The library building at 58 N. Parke St. was open for youngsters after school hours.
NEWS
By Sylvia Rogers, syltrog@verizon.net | April 18, 2013
Great music has been happening at the Parkville Senior Center. On April 3, members were treated to a wonderful concert when tenor Rodrigo Garciarroyo and pianist Richard Dowling presented well-known opera and stage musical selections in the center's dining room This hourlong program, sponsored by the Baltimore County Department of Aging, was made possible by the Piatigorsky Foundation, a nonprofit organization whose mission is...
NEWS
March 23, 1992
Lawrence B. Lindsey, the newest member of the Federal Reserve Board, was in town the other day with a springtime prediction that the U.S. economy would emerge from this recession stronger, more productive, its financial services sector better shape, money supply growth stable and the inflation rate way, way down. He declined to say when.Mr. Lindsey's remarks coincided with a spate of mildly encouraging statistics: unemployment insurance claims down, total employment and weekly hours worked up, housing climbing out of the doldrums, even a slight uptick in consumer confidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 10, 2002
It might be a stretch to say that The Producers would never have become a Broadway sensation had it not been for Dr. Demento's radio show - but it certainly didn't hurt. Dr. Demento - real name Barry Hansen - has spent the last 30 years collecting and playing weird, off-beat songs on his syndicated show, heard Sunday nights coast to coast. One of those songs was "Springtime for Hitler," from the soundtrack of the 1968 Mel Brooks film The Producers. Brooks wrote it as the musical centerpiece of a show-within-a-show that was intended to be so tasteless that it would have to fail.
NEWS
By Photos by Algerina Perna and Photos by Algerina Perna,Sun photographer | May 19, 2008
The Baltimore Farmers' Market, open under the Jones Falls Expressway on Sundays from May to December, offers deals on fruits, vegetables and other goods. This time of year, the springtime bounty brightens up the market, where guests can feast their eyes and other senses on the produce from area farmers.
NEWS
By Photos by Jed Kirschbaum and Photos by Jed Kirschbaum,Sun photographer | March 26, 2007
Signs of spring abound - and melted snows are lending springtime force to the cascading waters at Lake Roland in Robert E. Lee Park. This piece of wilderness, in Baltimore County off Interstate 83, features miles of hiking and jogging trails and is a popular spot for dog walkers. To see a multimedia presentation go to baltimoresun.com/waterfall.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp says: "I can't remember a year that the annual, aka dog-day, cicadas have been as abundant and active." I've noticed them, too. Unlike their "periodical" cousins, which emerge from the ground every 13 or 17 years in messy and noisy springtime invasions (most recently in 2004), these annual cicadas appear in late July, almost unnoticed except for their chattering love songs in the trees.
NEWS
December 26, 2005
Graduations are usually a springtime rite of passage. But on Thursday, 29 individuals with disabilities graduated from six vocational training programs at the Maryland State Department of Education's Division of Rehabilitation Services. The programs are designed to equip students with the skills so that they can work in industries that include cosmetology, automotive repair, office technology in accounting and security services. State Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick was guest speaker at the ceremony.
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Editorial from The Aegis | April 4, 2013
The heat of summertime is when roaring wildfires are fodder for reports on the national news, but for a few weeks in early spring and mid autumn, the outdoor conditions in northeastern Maryland make this area prone to field and woods fires. Late last week, and earlier this week brush fires were put out in wooded areas in Joppatowne and Fallston. Other fires have kept the volunteer fire service busy, and can be expected to do so for another two or three weeks. In the past, Maryland Forest Service staff have explained that in the springtime, a combination of factors make the outdoors vulnerable to errant sparks.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS AND THE RECORD | March 28, 2013
The snow on the day after the Christian observance of Palm Sunday and the first day of the Jewish observance of Passover was certainly an unusual occurrence in Harford County. The most vital of holidays for both faiths are very closely associated with springtime and the re-emergence of life. In Passover, the coming of age of the Jewish nation is celebrated as it signifies the Hebrew nation's departure from the despair of slavery in Egypt to freedom in a Promised Land, a territory flowing with milk and honey.
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Letter to The Aegis | March 21, 2013
Editor: I enjoyed [Jim Kennedy's recent column]. I grew up in Richmond, Va., and shad roe in the Spring was a big deal. I will admit that was 35 years ago. Each spring many local restaurants advertised "Specials on Shad roe. " Almost any way you could think of was a good idea. I personally enjoyed roe with scrambled eggs for breakfast. Sautéed roe for lunch or dinner was also very good. The local grocery stores advertised roe in their ads. We even had a local canner, "Tidewater," offer canned roe that made it available seasonable.
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By Katie V. Jones | April 17, 2012
Last September was the first time since its beginnings in 1974 that the community theater group September Song went "dark. " It was a heart-breaking decision for Joan Eichhorn, producer, but a necessary one. Financially-strapped after its sponsoring organization decided to part ways, September Song held a musical revue as a fundraiser, instead of a full-fledged production. "It is so grossly expensive to put on musical theater," Eichhorn said. "We had no choice but to go dark.
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April 11, 2012
Springtime 50 years ago was alive at the old Aberdeen Elementary School on North Philadelphia Boulevard. The playground (now Festival Park) was filled with children practicing for athletic events and the upcoming May Day. There were violets growing in the same spots where we picked them many years before. Mr. Aaronson's livestock were long gone, but memories of the old farmyard were still very vivid. The library building at 58 N. Parke St. was open for youngsters after school hours.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | March 7, 2012
Although winter in these parts hasn't been a terrible hardship this year, it's still pleasant to anticipate more moderate temperatures when you can put away the winter Crocs and start looking for your sandals. And who can blame you if you jump the proverbial gun and invite friends in for a petite soiree with a springtime theme. To celebrate the onset of a purportedly milder season, we present this simple - emphasis on simple - seasonal dinner for eight. Begin with goat cheese triangles used as a "garnish" on a salad of spring greens.
NEWS
By Peggy E. Lazaron | April 5, 1995
Spring is a time of beginnings and endings,Winter has fled, once so fierce, unrelenting.Heliotrope lilacs are waving their welcome,Bright golden dandelions seek our attention.Spring stabs the heart for the purest of reasons,Anarchy rules this most mystic of seasons,Tender and nurturing, mercilessly cruel,Covering the Earth with its blossoming jewels.Born in the Springtime, lies one of life's lessons,Fragile soft beauty deserves our expressions,Seeking a spiritual being within us,Fragments of solace for such grave injustice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Miesha Lowery | March 20, 2003
Can't wait to shake off the cold and gloom of winter? Longwood Gardens can get you in a springtime mood real fast. Its "Welcome Spring" display, featuring 16 indoor gardens, is in full bloom. The 3-acre display highlights thousands of familiar and exotic flowers, including daffodils, blue poppies, hyacinths, tulips, roses and orchids. Visitors also can enjoy gardening and cooking demonstrations, as well as Sunday concerts in the gardens. A free audio tour with more than two hours of information about the gardens is also available.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp says: "I can't remember a year that the annual, aka dog-day, cicadas have been as abundant and active." I've noticed them, too. Unlike their "periodical" cousins, which emerge from the ground every 13 or 17 years in messy and noisy springtime invasions (most recently in 2004), these annual cicadas appear in late July, almost unnoticed except for their chattering love songs in the trees.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 5, 2009
As if near-record rains in May were not enough, Maryland received a fresh June soaking overnight that threatened to continue today. "I'd say there's a ... good chance of seeing another inch or so, and by [tonight], another half-inch is possible," said meteorologist Andrew Ansorge at Penn State Weather Communications. Some spots could see as much as 2 more inches of rain before it ends. With soils saturated and streams high as a result of more than 7 inches of surplus rain in recent weeks, forecasters said it would not take much to flood low-lying roadways and send rivers and creeks over their banks.
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