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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Corporate Office Properties Trust, a real estate developer based in Columbia, has gained control of 15 acres in Springfield, Va., and plans to build a multi-structure development called Patriot Ridge with up to 980,000 square feet of space. Construction of the first building, containing about 240,000 square feet, is expected to begin by the end of 2010. Patriot Ridge will be next to the headquarters under construction for the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, part of the U. S. intelligence community.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
It is not often that a piece of Maryland architectural history goes on the market, which is one of myriad reasons that the Springfield Estate (also known as Peerce's Plantation) in northern Baltimore County is such a treasure. At a selling price of $1.975 million, this circa-1800 homestead was accurately restored and renovated by a previous owner.  "The original block of the house is a classic and true Federal period residence," said Nancy Hubble, the listing agent with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.
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NEWS
By Sara Forhetz and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 17, 2010
One man is dead after a house fire. It broke out Wednesday night in 1400 West Brower. Neighbors called the fire department around 10 p.m., saying that flames were coming out the back of the house. Crews arrived within minutes and quickly put out the fire. A man his forties was unresponsive in one of the front bedrooms. Crews performed CPR, but it was too late. The victim's name has not been released. The fire marshal is now trying to determine the cause. "We don't know yet whether it had working smoke alarms," said Springfield Fire Chief David Hall.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Tidy rows of more than 900 small gravestones, each with a number but no name, line a steep hillside at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville, a state facility for the mentally ill. For decades the hospital buried patients who died indigent, without family or friends, in Sunny Side Cemetery. Expediency made the grassy knoll surrounded by trees the patients' graveyard. In 1899, it was the closest ground to the complex that housed the most aged or critically ill. For patients whose bodies went unclaimed, there were no last prayers, no gathering of mourners and no chiseled names and dates noting their years on earth.
NEWS
March 31, 1994
While the fate of Springfield Hospital Center has yet to be decided, there is a strong likelihood that the state's Mental Hygiene Administration may ultimately close it. A recent report recommends that Maryland shut at least one of the three state hospitals -- Springfield, Spring Grove and Crownsville -- in the Baltimore metropolitan region.The development of drugs to treat the symptoms of severe mental illness has enabled many patients to live in the community and has reduced the need to maintain large residential psychiatric hospitals.
NEWS
May 6, 1994
Lost in the debate over whether to close Springfield Hospital Center, the state psychiatric institution in South Carroll, is the fate of the very people it is intended to serve -- the severely mentally ill. Too much focus to this point has been on the impact the closing might have on the community.At a recent hearing in Westminster, the clear sentiment was to keep Springfield open. Sykesville residents are afraid, with good reason, that if the large hospital is closed, bureaucrats will find other less desirable uses for its several hundred acres.
NEWS
September 8, 1993
During his six years as superintendent of Springfield Hospital Center, Dr. Bruce Hershfield improved conditions and programs at the state's largest public psychiatric hospital. He added innovative programs, reduced the number of patients and took action to ensure that the Sykesville hospital did not lose its accreditation. What's more, he accomplished this during a freeze on hiring and staff salaries.Yet Dr. Hershfield's most important achievement may have to do with preparing mentally ill people to live in the community outside Springfield's grassy expanses.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | March 20, 1991
Robbie Laird clutched what he believed to be the damning evidence in his left hand. Not that it will do him or the Skipjacks any good."I want to show them," Laird said, speaking of American Hockey League officials, "how bad a call it was. But what good will it do? It's not going to get the point back."No, whatever Laird had on the videotape that he held in an angry grip will not reverse last night's wretched 5-2 loss to the Springfield Indians. Nor will it erase the controversial goal that sent the Skipjacks reeling to their third straight defeat at the Arena.
NEWS
July 7, 1993
In government bureaucracies, flexibility and common sense are not qualities held in high esteem. Following rules to the letter, no matter how nonsensical, usually takes precedence. That is why Dave Wilmouth now runs the risk of being suspended from his job at the Springfield Hospital Center in western Carroll County.Mr. Wilmouth, a direct-care worker, is assigned to one of three wards in the McKeldin Building, a brick structure that houses 70 patients but doesn't have any air conditioning.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2000
Springfield, Ill., has been named the nation's most affordable housing market for the third quarter of this year. The National Association of Home Builders' Housing Opportunity Index showed that families earning the median income of $50,200 could afford to buy 58.1 percent of the homes sold nationwide in the quarter, down 5.3 percent from last year. The Baltimore area was ranked 59th. Families with the regional median income of $63,100 could afford 71.6 percent of area homes, for which the median sales price was $141,000, up 12.8 percent from the previous quarter.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
A state legislative audit of Springfield Hospital Center found that the state psychiatric hospital in Sykesville was not keeping good records or controls of its $2.4 million stable of pharmaceuticals. The audit, from Oct. 1, 2008, to July 28, 2011, showed that the hospital had the same pharmacists in charge of keeping records on the inventory and overseeing the drugs. And they were not removing expired drugs from the records, nor were they logging in drugs returned unused. Auditors said the lack of control "could allow them to be misappropriated without detection.
EXPLORE
October 20, 2011
In July, Michelle Natale, a teacher at Mount de Sales Academy, participated in the Horace Mann-Abraham Lincoln Fellowship Program in Springfield, Ill. In addition to viewing Lincoln's home, tomb and museum, the group heard experts speak on the Civil War era. She plans to incorporate some of the lessons learned when she teaches her history, government and economics courses at the all-girls Catholic high school in Catonsville. Her National History Club will work on a mini-museum project and her advanced placement United States history class will analyze parts of "The Conspirator," in recognition of the Civil War's sesquicentennial.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | July 14, 2011
THURSDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS NASCAR Nationwide Feed the Children 300 (T) SPEEDNoon K&N Pro Infineon (T) SPEED6 MLB Intentional Talk Live MLB5 MLB Tonight Live MLB6 Cleveland@Orioles MASN7 Yankees@Toronto MLB7 Cleveland@Orioles (T) MASN11:30 WNBA Seattle@San Antonio ESPN29 Cycling Tour de France: Stage 12 VS.6:30 a.m. Tour de France: Stage 12 (T)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 29, 2010
Frances K. "Kay" Colley, a retired Howard County mathematics teacher and volunteer, died Monday of breast cancer at her Westminster home. She was 83. Frances Kathleen Sparling, the daughter of a Lehigh Valley Railroad engineer and a homemaker, was born in Bethlehem, Pa. Mrs. Colley was raised in Hazelton, Pa., and Leighton, Pa., where she graduated in 1945 from Leighton High School. She was a 1949 graduate of what is now East Stroudsburg University in East Stroudsburg, Pa., where she majored in both math and English.
NEWS
By Sara Forhetz and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 17, 2010
One man is dead after a house fire. It broke out Wednesday night in 1400 West Brower. Neighbors called the fire department around 10 p.m., saying that flames were coming out the back of the house. Crews arrived within minutes and quickly put out the fire. A man his forties was unresponsive in one of the front bedrooms. Crews performed CPR, but it was too late. The victim's name has not been released. The fire marshal is now trying to determine the cause. "We don't know yet whether it had working smoke alarms," said Springfield Fire Chief David Hall.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Corporate Office Properties Trust, a real estate developer based in Columbia, has gained control of 15 acres in Springfield, Va., and plans to build a multi-structure development called Patriot Ridge with up to 980,000 square feet of space. Construction of the first building, containing about 240,000 square feet, is expected to begin by the end of 2010. Patriot Ridge will be next to the headquarters under construction for the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, part of the U. S. intelligence community.
NEWS
November 1, 1992
A patient who escaped from Springfield State Hospital last Tuesday was still missing late Friday, according to Michael Golden, a spokesman for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.The man, described as 6 feet 4 inches tall and weighing 200 pounds, reportedly left the hospital about 11:45 a.m. dressed in blue jeans, a gray hooded sweat shirt and white tennis shoes.It is unclear how he left the hospital without detection.Residents of the nearby Carrolltowne development reported that house in the 1600 block of Andylin Way was ransacked the day of the escape, clothes were stolen from the house and a Springfield uniform was found there.
NEWS
January 13, 1993
Sykesville residents living around the Springfield Hospital Center in South Carroll should heed Vice President Dan Quayle's admonition to Vice President-elect Albert Gore during their debate last fall -- "Tale a deep breath. . . exhale, Al." The level of rhetoric, emotion and anger over the possible transfer of 18 potentially dangerous mentally retarded adults from the Rosewood Center in Owings Mills has risen to such a level that rational discourse has ended.Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini didn't help matters with his disdainful treatment of the residents and their concerns last week.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | May 16, 2010
Geoff Hebert (Dulaney) totaled a career-high 22 saves while six different starters scored at least three points to power top-seeded Stevenson past Cabrini, 19-9, in the second round of the men's NCAA Division III tournament. The Mustangs (18-1) outscored the Cavaliers (15-4), 17-7, over the final three quarters. The win marks the eighth straight for Stevenson this season and its third in four NCAA tournament games after the team went 2-1 a year ago in advancing to the national semifinals.
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