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NEWS
April 1, 2010
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Development is threatening the narrow but resource-rich Appalachian trail, and the National Park Conservation Association says more must be done to protect it. In a report released Wednesday, the association said threats include subdivisions, power lines, quarries, wind farms, racetracks, illegal all-terrain vehicle use and mountain bikes. All along the 2,178-mile trail, the report says, decisions about projects must consider "the special and fragile character" of the trail.
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NEWS
April 1, 2010
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Development is threatening the narrow but resource-rich Appalachian trail, and the National Park Conservation Association says more must be done to protect it. In a report released Wednesday, the association said threats include subdivisions, power lines, quarries, wind farms, racetracks, illegal all-terrain vehicle use and mountain bikes. All along the 2,178-mile trail, the report says, decisions about projects must consider "the special and fragile character" of the trail.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 22, 2010
The nation's most famous hiking trail will soon have a museum to house its artifacts and tell its story. The Appalachian Trail Museum will open June 5 in a 200-year-old grist mill at Pine Grove Furnace State Park, about two hours north of Baltimore and just two miles from the halfway point of the 2,175-mile Appalachian Trail. Potomac Appalachian Trail Club volunteers will rehabilitate the building to bring it up to code and install displays, said Larry Luxenberg, president of the Appalachian Trail Museum Society, who got the ball rolling and began collecting trail memorabilia a dozen years ago. "We have a great collection and we think that when the doors open, artifacts will pour in," he said.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 22, 2010
The nation's most famous hiking trail will soon have a museum to house its artifacts and tell its story. The Appalachian Trail Museum will open June 5 in a 200-year-old grist mill at Pine Grove Furnace State Park, about two hours north of Baltimore and just two miles from the halfway point of the 2,175-mile Appalachian Trail. Potomac Appalachian Trail Club volunteers will rehabilitate the building to bring it up to code and install displays, said Larry Luxenberg, president of the Appalachian Trail Museum Society, who got the ball rolling and began collecting trail memorabilia a dozen years ago. "We have a great collection and we think that when the doors open, artifacts will pour in," he said.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2001
"I'M MORE AT HOME out in the middle of nowhere than anywhere else," says Jon Rudolf, a 35-year-old auto mechanic from Yellow Springs, Ohio. He has found a way to combine his love of hiking and the great outdoors with a worthwhile cause that ties him and his wife, Kathy, to this community. Kathy, 37, completed work on her master's degree in information systems technology in December at Wright State University in Ohio, just in time to join her husband on a hike along the Appalachian Trail, a trip they estimate will take six to seven months.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Elroy J. Snouffer, a Baltimore lawyer and accountant who hiked the 2,000-mile Appalachian Trail without ever spending a night in a sleeping bag, died Monday of heart failure at his Lansdowne home. He was 78.Mr. Snouffer began hiking the Appalachian Trail in 1965, but he didn't do it all at once. He'd select a section of the trail he wanted to hike, then he and his wife would drive to the chosen point. He'd hike and she'd meet him at the other end.Although such an unorthodox approach pegged him as a novice "day hiker" in the eyes of serious hikers, Mr. Snouffer, a carefree and jocular soul, was unmoved.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | May 23, 1991
NEW BLOOMFIELD, Pa. -- Beside a country meadow in central Pennsylvania, next to an Amish buggy maker's shop, lies the modest grave of Molly Ann LaRue.She is buried beside her grandfather, beneath fresh daisies and a gray granite stone that tells when she lived -- Feb. 10, 1965-Sept. 13, 1990 -- and how: "A life shared with children, art and nature."Molly LaRue and her boyfriend, Geoffrey Hood, were murdered last year on the Appalachian Trail, about 70 miles from where she is now buried. As the trial for their alleged killer proceeds here, it has provided a bittersweet glimpse into the final days of the two young lovers -- and the close-knit community of hikers who shared their near-mystical affection for the path.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | October 6, 1990
Not far north of the Maryland border, near the town of Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., lies the halfway point of the Appalachian Trail. A simple sign with a double-ended arrow points southwest toward Springer Mountain, Ga., 1,025 miles distant, and northeast toward Mount Katahdin, Maine, also 1,025 miles away.Hikers linger here to take photos of the sign and contemplate their tenuous yet unmistakable connection to both places.Although less than 200 individuals a year actually traverse the entire 2,050-mile length of the AT (as the footpath is simply and fondly called by most who have trod it)
TRAVEL
February 7, 1999
The world on a trail; A Memorable TripKeith Krejci, Special to the SunWithin a day's drive of more than half the population of the United States can be found a place unlike any other. A place where every person is responsible for himself or herself but cannot survive without the help of others. A place where best friends can be made in minutes and nothing is taken for granted. The place of which I speak is the Appalachian Trail -- a continuous footpath running the crest of the mountain range from Georgia to Maine.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 12, 2013
In 1948, three years after the end of World War II, an Army veteran from Pennsylvania named Earl Shaffer hiked the entire length of the Appalachian Trail. No one had ever done that before. Completing the Georgia-to-Maine trek in 124 days, Shaffer became the trail's first "thru-hiker. " He took on the challenge, he said, as a way of recovering from his combat experiences and from the loss of a boyhood friend who had died in the Pacific. Shaffer said he wanted to "walk off the war. " More than 60 years later, the Shaffer legend has inspired a "walk off the war" program for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2001
"I'M MORE AT HOME out in the middle of nowhere than anywhere else," says Jon Rudolf, a 35-year-old auto mechanic from Yellow Springs, Ohio. He has found a way to combine his love of hiking and the great outdoors with a worthwhile cause that ties him and his wife, Kathy, to this community. Kathy, 37, completed work on her master's degree in information systems technology in December at Wright State University in Ohio, just in time to join her husband on a hike along the Appalachian Trail, a trip they estimate will take six to seven months.
SPORTS
March 28, 2010
G - From the first tiny mention in Backpacker magazine about a decade ago, Larry Luxenberg's dream of creating a museum to spotlight the Appalachian Trail and its hikers has had as many ups and downs as the 2,178-mile footpath itself. Buildings were too expensive, too decrepit or too remote. Support from public officials, elusive in the best of times, came and went with the economy and elections. Still, Luxenberg soldiered on, putting one foot in front of the other, just as he did in 1980, when he completed his Georgia-to-Maine hike.
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