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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 11, 1998
Clark MacKenzie, from Green Spring Valley Hunt Club, registered the only below-par round with a 2-under 34-3468 at the Country Club of Maryland yesterday, and won the medal by three shots in sectional qualifying for the U.S. Senior Amateur championship.With five places available, the other spots went to Frank Bart, Hillendale CC, 34-3771; Jack Vardaman, Congressional CC, 35-3671; Jay Cullen, Elkridge Club, 37-3572; and Paul Loveless, Shepherdstown, W. Va., 36-3672. Pat O'Malley of Baltimore CC also had 72, but lost to two pars in a three-for-two playoff.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Peter Young Martin, a former golf professional and Green Spring Valley Hunt Club champion, died of a respiratory illness March 31 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Owings Mills resident was 64. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John William Young Martin and Nancy Byers Martin. He was raised at the family home, Snow Hill Farm, site of the Maryland Hunt Cup point-to-point race in the Worthington Valley in Baltimore County. Mr. Martin attended the Gilman Lower School and was a 1966 graduate of Avon Old Farms School in Avon, Conn.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Bruce Reid and Joe Nawrozki and Bruce Reid,Staff Writers | April 22, 1992
Baltimore County police say they have beefed up patrols in a Green Spring Valley neighborhood where two men invaded the exclusive home of a couple early Monday and terrorized them before making off with more than $250,000 worth of valuables.Yesterday, police continued to search for the robbers, who escaped with jewelry, furs, cash and a luxury car. Investigators said Sheldon Goldseker, 52, and his wife, Shelley, 41, were handcuffed by the robbers -- one of whom was armed with a chrome-plated handgun -- and bound with duct tape.
CLASSIFIED
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
The house that ranks as the Baltimore region's priciest sale in August is, in the words of the sellers' real estate agent, "understated" — the sort of home that doesn't smack you in the eye with its high-end glitz. The four-bedroom home on Golf Course Road West in Owings Mills, which sits on 2 acres near Green Spring Valley Hunt Club's golf course, changed hands for just over $3.1 million. "It wasn't a McMansion," said Linda Corbin of Prudential Homesale YWGC Realty, the listing agent.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
Owners of the Greenspring Racquet Club -- their development plans blocked by county law -- are hoping to exploit a zoning loophole that will let them build a proposed 242,000-square-foot office building and parking garage at Falls and Greenspring Valley roads.William and Loretta Hirshfeld want Baltimore County to change the zoning on their 5.5-acre parcel to a designation exempt from a law passed by the county last fall governing the height of buildings next to rural areas.As a first step, the Hirshfelds -- whose property is near the gateway to the scenic Green Spring Valley -- will ask the county planning board this week to find that it is in the public interest to permit a hearing on the property's zoning.
NEWS
By Dan Caterinicchia and Dan Caterinicchia,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A landscape of manicured trees, bushes and Asian ornaments sits on a plateau above the South Korean Embassy in the capital's posh Spring Valley neighborhood.Red, white and blue tape clinging to trees marks off several sections. The tape does not signify the school colors of nearby American University. Rather, it indicates where the Army Corps of Engineers began digging this week for chemical weapons thought to have been buried decades ago.The Army is hunting for a site where poisonous weapons were tested and then discarded at the American University Experiment Station during World War I. Many residents say they are worried, particularly about elevated levels of arsenic in the soil.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2001
If J. Crew and Farm & Fleet ever combined their catalogs, Patrick A. Rodgers would be on the cover. Rodgers, a 23-year-old lacrosse player, wears chinos smeared with dirt and has hands caked with tractor grease. Soon to graduate from the University of Maryland, College Park, he's raising hay and 40 head of beef cattle in Green Spring Valley. At a time when land preservationists are looking for ways to pass their passion for rural life to their suburban-minded neighbors, Rodgers represents the bridge Green Spring Valley elders seek between what the valley was and what they hope it will become.
NEWS
May 18, 1995
Mercifully, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals has put an end to the three-year tussle over the expansion of Villa Julie College in Baltimore County's Green Spring Valley, ruling favorably and forcefully for the college.The tortuous route to the court's finding began in July 1992, when county Zoning Commissioner Lawrence E. Schmidt stated a 31-page decision that the college could expand onto land formerly zoned for farming. However, he added, the growth of student enrollment would have to be limited.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2004
Before voting on a zoning amendment that would open farmland to bioscience research facilities, the county commissioners will tour Spring Valley Laboratories in Woodbine. Spring Valley, a 110-acre farm, has housed labs for breeding and testing animals since 1980. The business tests vaccines and has contracts with the National Institutes of Health and several private companies. It also is involved in bioterrorism research. The laboratory, which employs 30 scientists and lab technicians, had a payroll of nearly $1.2 million last year.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
The Green Spring Valley couple who won a court order forcing a neighbor to remove 200 trees blocking their scenic view say they have received several "hate calls" since The Sun first reported the neighborhood feud May 3.Dr. Onkar and Shakuntala Singh, who have caller identification, reported at least one of the four or five calls to police, along with the number from which the call originated, said Robert E. Cahill Jr., attorney for the couple. No arrests have been made.In addition to using foul language and calling the Singhs "tree killers," some of the callers made racist remarks on the couple's answering machine, telling them to return to their native India, according to tapes of the calls played for a reporter.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A knock rarely brings the owner to the front door of Stemmer House. It is more likely that she will emerge to greet you from her gardens, wearing her trademark galoshes, tool belt, work gloves and sun hat. Though Barbara Holdridge has lived in this historic Baltimore County home for nearly 40 years, it is her gardens that demand her time and attention. More than six of the 27 acres that surround the home are formally landscaped, and if they don't need to be weeded, they need to be watered.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Cary Wilson Jackson, a noted Maryland horseman, builder and developer who had been on the board of the Maryland Million Classic, died Feb. 7 in an automobile accident near White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. He was 88. At the time of the accident, Mr. Jackson was returning to his home in White Hall, Baltimore County, from Lexington, Ky., where he had sold a mare at the Keeneland horse sale. "Cary Jackson defined the term 'Maryland horseman' at its best. He did it all," said Ross Peddicord, former Baltimore Sun racing writer who is now executive director of the Maryland Horse Industry Board.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
One of the Baltimore area's most historically significant residences is headed for a foreclosure auction today, more than two years after owner and prominent businessman Stephen A. Geppi put it up for sale for $7.7 million amid the slumping housing market. The mid-19th-century mansion in Green Spring Valley known as Cliffeholme, with eight bedrooms and nine fireplaces, is scheduled for sale at the Baltimore County Courthouse with an outstanding mortgage debt of $3.25 million, court records show.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
G. Leslie "Les" Grimes, the Green Spring Valley Hounds' huntsman for 35 seasons, died of a heart ailment Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Butler resident was 89. On a fox hunt, Mr. Grimes, astride a horse and dressed in a scarlet coat, would use his distinctive voice and a horn to lead a pack of nearly 40 hounds. "Tall and slow-talking, with a face scored from all those years outdoors, Mr. Grimes moves with the kind of lanky grace that hounds and horses find reassuring," read a 1973 Evening Sun profile.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | November 24, 2007
One day this week, workers began to disassemble a red barn in Green Spring Valley. They did not get far. Before the crew could finish removing the siding, a neighbor had called police, and Baltimore County officials ordered the work stopped, threatening a hefty fine. The barn is, a lawyer for its owner has said, nothing special. It is, some neighbors say, a precious link to the area's past. In Baltimore County, more than a few battles have been fought over a community's interest in preserving its history versus an individual's right to do as he pleases with his property.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1994
W. James Howard, a dedicated conservationist and advocate of the preservation of open space in Baltimore County, died Saturdayfrom complications of emphysema at his home in the Green Spring Valley. He was 63.A real estate agent with W.H.C. Wilson & Co. Realtors in Baltimore for over 30 years, Mr. Howard, along with other members of his family, donated the development rights of more than 100 acres in the Green Spring Valley to the Maryland Environmental Trust.He was a member of the Valleys Planning Council, which works to preserve open space in the Green Spring and Worthington valleys.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
The Carroll County commissioners unanimously enacted an ordinance yesterday that will allow bioscience research facilities to operate in areas zoned for agriculture. The ordinance could affect any possible expansion of Spring Valley Laboratories in Woodbine, the county's only animal research facility. The facility, on a 110-acre farm, has housed labs for breeding and testing animals since 1980. The business tests vaccines and has contracts with the National Institutes of Health and several private companies.
NEWS
October 27, 2007
Joan R. McMahon, owner and operator of a Green Spring Valley produce stand, died Thursday of cancer at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Pocomoke resident, who had formerly lived in Bare Hills, was 63. Born Joan Roberta Teague, she was raised in Hampden. She attended Baltimore public schools. From 1974 until this week, she operated Joan's Produce at Hillside Road and Greenspring Avenue, where she sold only Harford County-grown produce, family members said. Her daughter, Lorrie Lee Jachelski, a registered nurse who lives in Whiteford, said her mother received the cancer diagnosis only last week.
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