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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | August 30, 1991
Weber's on Boston stands at the crossroads of old and new. Quite literally: To one side are the ranks of expensive new condos lining what is now called (without irony, apparently) "Canton's Gold Coast." Look the other way, though, and the scene is do Weber's on Boston stands at the crossroads of old and new. Quite literally: To one side are the ranks of expensive new condos lining what is now called (without irony, apparently) "Canton's Gold Coast." Look the other way, though, and the scene is dominated by the semi-derelict, but still dauntlessly deco, American Can Company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 4, 2013
A soup-centric ethnic restaurant seems like an odd fit for a suburban hotel. But at the Best Western on Cromwell Bridge Road in Towson, Pho Towson has made a well-deserved splash. Pho - the popular Vietnamese soup with a DIY component - is scrumptious and healthy. The meal starts with a bowl of broth and noodles. Diners customize with herbs, citrus and protein. At Pho Towson, most ingredients are fresh and the broths are complex. Coupled with service that is kind, if occasionally spotty, the restaurant is a treat for both locals and hotel guests.
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SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | December 25, 2008
Candy, I can't believe you're forcing me to argue against Santa Claus on Christmas. That's just wrong. But if it's Scrooge I must be, here are some loose threads in that famous red suit. I know you all are expecting me to go the weight route. And really, I could point out that the Orioles have a checkered history with hefty hurlers, from El Sid to Sir Sidney. But as a portly fellow myself, I'm going to hover above that low road. I'm more worried about age. The Orioles have declared a youth movement, and we have to respect the mission by eschewing a chap with a white beard and a nose weathered by too many years on the sleigh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Get ready to feel old. Thairish turned 21 on Nov. 2. Owner and chef Kerrigan Kitikul is still behind the counter at this cheerful and sunny walk-up in Mount Vernon's Park Plaza building. Thairish survived the December 2010 fire that gutted the Park Plaza, and it's outlasted a dozen or so other neighborhood restaurants that have come and gone over the past two decades. Hanging on the walls are reviews of and articles about Thairish from the early 1990s, when Thai food wasn't quite as omnipresent in Baltimore is it is now. A few of the framed clippings explain that the restaurant's name, Thairish, is a combination of Thai and Irish - Kitikul's wife is Irish, and the chef/owner is an admirer of Irish culture.
FEATURES
By Michele Santos and Michele Santos,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 30, 1994
You make a beeline for the egg rolls at Chinese restaurant buffets. You relish the crunch of the crispy Crab Rangoon served with your lunch special. You wonder why you can't make these appealing appetizers at home.L Well, you can. And it's not as difficult as you might think.Even if you don't take a class, a good recipe and a willingness to experiment are all you need to learn to make many Asian appetizers.By doing it yourself, you can also make these foods more healthful. You can use low-fat cream cheese in the Crab Rangoon, fry the egg rolls in canola oil or just stick with fresh spring rolls, which aren't fried.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | September 8, 1991
The sun fell through Weber's west windows just as dinner was served. What beautiful juices on the grilled pork chop, what a glowing caramel-colored sauce under it, and how silvery the chardonnay in the glass. Business at the recently opened eatery was thriving, and no wonder. Even the sun wants Weber's to prosper.It might be better not to go immediately, though. The noise level is deafening, they're so busy. But eventually, find your way to Weber's for a casual, inexpensive meal in an old pub attractively done up, and cheerfully, raucously welcoming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Get ready to feel old. Thairish turned 21 on Nov. 2. Owner and chef Kerrigan Kitikul is still behind the counter at this cheerful and sunny walk-up in Mount Vernon's Park Plaza building. Thairish survived the December 2010 fire that gutted the Park Plaza, and it's outlasted a dozen or so other neighborhood restaurants that have come and gone over the past two decades. Hanging on the walls are reviews of and articles about Thairish from the early 1990s, when Thai food wasn't quite as omnipresent in Baltimore is it is now. A few of the framed clippings explain that the restaurant's name, Thairish, is a combination of Thai and Irish - Kitikul's wife is Irish, and the chef/owner is an admirer of Irish culture.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 27, 2004
IT was a dark and stormy night. OK, it was raining gently but steadily on a June evening, but still... It was the kind of evening when you want comfort food in a cozy setting, with the staff welcoming you like family. Thai Landing, one of Baltimore's first Thai restaurants, delivered on all counts. The last time I ate there was 10 years ago. But the number of new restaurants that have opened up on Thai Landing's section of Charles Street has stirred my interest in the old ones, and I remembered my last meal there -- even though distantly -- with pleasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2008
Eden's Lounge is much better known as a nightclub, lounge and all-around posh gathering spot than as a restaurant. In a city where sexy, upscale clubs seem to come and go, Eden's Lounge has maintained. It's an especially beautiful club, too, making wonderful use of an old building's good bones (the Eager House used to be here) with an interlocking series of sumptuously exotic rooms, each offering different levels of cushiness and comfort. It's a club worth dressing up for, and on its Web site, Eden's Lounge tells its customers they had better do just that - "sophisticated and stylish dress a must."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2003
The sign above the sushi and Chinese food buffet at China Best is one of the strangest I've ever seen. Written in large black letters on pink cardboard, it notes that the sushi in the buffet is meant to be eaten with rice. If the fish is eaten without the rice, customers will be charged $1 per rice ball that is left on the plate. I understand the sentiment at work here: If customers didn't fill up on rice, the $14.29 buffet price tag ($7.57 for lunch) would be a money pit for the restaurant.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | December 25, 2008
Candy, I can't believe you're forcing me to argue against Santa Claus on Christmas. That's just wrong. But if it's Scrooge I must be, here are some loose threads in that famous red suit. I know you all are expecting me to go the weight route. And really, I could point out that the Orioles have a checkered history with hefty hurlers, from El Sid to Sir Sidney. But as a portly fellow myself, I'm going to hover above that low road. I'm more worried about age. The Orioles have declared a youth movement, and we have to respect the mission by eschewing a chap with a white beard and a nose weathered by too many years on the sleigh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2008
Eden's Lounge is much better known as a nightclub, lounge and all-around posh gathering spot than as a restaurant. In a city where sexy, upscale clubs seem to come and go, Eden's Lounge has maintained. It's an especially beautiful club, too, making wonderful use of an old building's good bones (the Eager House used to be here) with an interlocking series of sumptuously exotic rooms, each offering different levels of cushiness and comfort. It's a club worth dressing up for, and on its Web site, Eden's Lounge tells its customers they had better do just that - "sophisticated and stylish dress a must."
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2006
The P.F. Chang's people have brought another restaurant chain to Maryland, called Pei Wei Asian Diner. Pei Wei is more casual than P.F. Chang's China Bistro, with customers ordering at the counter, but the food delivers a similar level of energy, and the setting is equally pleasing, though in a different way. P.F. Chang's, which has locations at The Mall in Columbia and in Bethesda, specializes in intensely flavored Chinese food, with showy presentations and...
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 27, 2004
IT was a dark and stormy night. OK, it was raining gently but steadily on a June evening, but still... It was the kind of evening when you want comfort food in a cozy setting, with the staff welcoming you like family. Thai Landing, one of Baltimore's first Thai restaurants, delivered on all counts. The last time I ate there was 10 years ago. But the number of new restaurants that have opened up on Thai Landing's section of Charles Street has stirred my interest in the old ones, and I remembered my last meal there -- even though distantly -- with pleasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2003
The sign above the sushi and Chinese food buffet at China Best is one of the strangest I've ever seen. Written in large black letters on pink cardboard, it notes that the sushi in the buffet is meant to be eaten with rice. If the fish is eaten without the rice, customers will be charged $1 per rice ball that is left on the plate. I understand the sentiment at work here: If customers didn't fill up on rice, the $14.29 buffet price tag ($7.57 for lunch) would be a money pit for the restaurant.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
It's opening day at the Baltimore Farmers' Market under the Jones Falls Expressway, and the line grows long at the Curry Shack. Three years ago, Didi and Brian Johnson opened their stall at both the Baltimore and Waverly markets and quickly attracted a ravenous following. The Johnsons' jerk chicken, plantain chips, creole red beans and rice, samosas, soups and curries often sell out well before the market closes. This year, they will expand to the weekly market at the Village of Cross Keys.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2003
Iheard about Allissa's from one of the many 14-year-old pizza fanatics I know, so we gave it a try, figuring it was one of your basic neighborhood pizza and pasta places. Well, it was. But it was a good bit more, with an oddly eclectic assortment of dishes with influences from Jamaica to Vietnam, not to mention Maryland and Philadelphia. Sometimes such wide variety can overwhelm a kitchen, but Allissa's seems to know how to handle its long menu. The restaurant, which sits in a shopping center anchored by a supermarket and video-rental outlet just north of Hampden, has several green-topped tables in a small dining room with a horsy theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2006
The P.F. Chang's people have brought another restaurant chain to Maryland, called Pei Wei Asian Diner. Pei Wei is more casual than P.F. Chang's China Bistro, with customers ordering at the counter, but the food delivers a similar level of energy, and the setting is equally pleasing, though in a different way. P.F. Chang's, which has locations at The Mall in Columbia and in Bethesda, specializes in intensely flavored Chinese food, with showy presentations and...
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 13, 2003
These days to describe a restaurant's food as "Continental" is almost a genteel insult. There's a whiff of pretentiousness about it. You never say "Continental cooking"; it's always "Continental cuisine." What's more, the word implies that the dishes lack the individuality and authenticity of true regional cooking. The restaurant that serves such food is by definition somewhat fuddy-duddy: When "Conti-nental" isn't followed by "cuisine," it's followed by "classics." As a result, Continental restaurants -- those whose food is inspired by France, Italy and other European countries -- are a dying breed.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2003
Iheard about Allissa's from one of the many 14-year-old pizza fanatics I know, so we gave it a try, figuring it was one of your basic neighborhood pizza and pasta places. Well, it was. But it was a good bit more, with an oddly eclectic assortment of dishes with influences from Jamaica to Vietnam, not to mention Maryland and Philadelphia. Sometimes such wide variety can overwhelm a kitchen, but Allissa's seems to know how to handle its long menu. The restaurant, which sits in a shopping center anchored by a supermarket and video-rental outlet just north of Hampden, has several green-topped tables in a small dining room with a horsy theme.
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